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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Dances With Wolves"
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A Glimpse into the Past with "Dances With Wolves" - Dances with Wolves is an epic film made in the year nineteen ninety shot in South Dakota and Wyoming. The film tells the story of a Civil War-era and a United States Army officer, Lieutenant Dunbar who travels to the American frontier to find a military post and befriends a local Sioux tribe. It shows how life was in times of the Civil War. The movie also shows how Indians lived and how they respected everything except the white men. This film tells the story of Lieutenant Dunbar, a United States Army Officer and a Indian tribe who eventually in time after meeting become friends....   [tags: Dances With Wolves, Native Americans, ] 644 words
(1.8 pages)
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Dances with Wolves: Changing from a Dignified Solider to a Sioux Warrior - In the movie Dances with Wolves Lieutenant John Dunbar is a dynamic character; changing throughout the film from a dignified United States Army soldier, to a passionate Lakota Sioux member. On his journey, Dances With Wolves takes in many experiences many have only dreamt about. When he rides Cisco out onto the battlefield in a suicide attempt, he has no idea that he indeed will live and will never lead the same life again. John Dunbar changed in many ways reflected upon in the film, including: mindset, clothing, and his sense of identity; it is though these character traits that Dances With Wolves discovers that inside everyone is a frontier just waiting to be explored....   [tags: Dances with Wolves,] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves - Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves    In his novel, ”Dances With Wolves”,  Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader.             Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.)  Tone can be defined as the emotion or feeling set upon a reader during a novel/short story. Most times, the tone will change. It can change from sad to dramatic, happy to angry, angry to calm, or basically anything else....   [tags: Dances With Wolves] 437 words
(1.2 pages)
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Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake - Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake is a novel that covers the topics of cross-culture, equality and respect. It also shows me the history of modern America. Reading this novel is a great adventure to me. Through years of getting ready, Michael Blake spent nine months on writing the book and got it done in 1981. The story happens in 1863, when US civil war was in ongoing. Knowing the potential amputation of his wounded leg, Union Army Officer Lieutenant John J. Dunbar turns suicidal and rides a horse to attract the enemy during a strange standoff....   [tags: Michael Blake Dances Wolves] 1818 words
(5.2 pages)
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Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves - Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves In Kevin Costner's motion picture Dances With Wolves, a white veteran of the Civil War, John Dunbar, ventures to the American frontier, where he encounters a tribe of Sioux Indians. At first, both parties are quite wary and almost hostile to each other, but after some time, Dunbar realizes that they have both grown to love and value each other as friends. As the movie critic Robert Ebert comments, "Dunbar possesses the one quality he needs to cut through the entrenched racism of his time: He is able to look another man in the eye, and see the man, rather than his attitudes about the man....   [tags: Dances With Wolves Film Essays]
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1805 words
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Dances With Wolves - Dances With Wolves In his movie Dances With Wolves actor Kevin Costner tries to do away with any preconceived notions that the viewer might have had about the Native American Indians being a savage and inhuman race. He does this by first unraveling the mysteriousness of the Indians then he brings the viewer to a point of connectedness with the Indians and their culture. We then come to a sincere appreciation for them as human beings and individuals and find ourselves siding with them in matters of allegiance....   [tags: Film Movie Dances With Wolves Papers] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Indian and the White Communites in Dances with Wolves and Machimanito - The Indian and the White Communites in Dances with Wolves and Machimanito The film Dances with Wolves shares a lot of its content with the story Machimanito. In Dances with Wolves, two nations come to interact with each other. While the white man is dominating the land, the Indians are trying to protect both their land and themselves. In Machimanito, the story describes the epidemic and its effects on the Indians, while describing the ongoing conflict between Indians and the white man. There is a huge cultural difference between the white man and the Indians, which is reflected on their ways of life and communities; each lives a different life style including their interaction with nature...   [tags: Dances Wolves Machimanito Compare Essays] 2087 words
(6 pages)
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Dances with Wolves - The representation of American Indians in US pop culture is troubling at best: natives are frequently depicted as violent savages and out of touch with human values. To counter this, Kevin Costner, being part Cherokee himself, chooses to portray a positive and realistic image of American Indians in his film Dances with Wolves. Although one could argue that the film does appear to validate certain stereotypes, Costner calculatedly—much like a game of chess—uses these stereotypes to connect with his viewers and ultimately forces them into checkmate without their realizing....   [tags: Native American, Kevin Costner, Indians] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
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Film Critique of Dances with Wolves - Film Critique of “Dances with Wolves” This is a wonderful movie that is set in 1863 during the civil war. The main character is John Dunbar, a Lieutenant in the United States Army, who is played by Kevin Costner. The movie begins with Dunbar in the field hospital with a severely wounded leg that the Dr.’s are planning to amputate. Dunbar decides that he does not want to live minus a leg and leaves the field hospital, takes a horse and rides across the length of the enemy lines where he expects that he will meet his death....   [tags: Soldier, Sioux, Culture]
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Dances with Wolves - Dances with Wolves Lt. John Dunbar was lying on a hospital bed, leg totally mutilated. Barely conscious, the man over heard the surgeon say he could not amputate this mans leg as tired as he was. Dunbar didn’t like what he heard, so when the surgeons left, he grabbed his boat, and he slowly slid the boat up his mutilated foot biting on a stick to relive the massive pain. He returned to the battlefield, with only one thing on his mind, suicide. So, he took a horse, and rode it directly in front of the Confederate army....   [tags: Native Americans Movies Essays] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Dances With Wolves - Dances With Wolves No matter how you choose to categorize human beings, whether by race or religion, nationality or gender, the resultant categories will display at least one immutable constant. Each group, no matter how diverse their beliefs or how dissimilar their behaviors, will contain men of honest and peaceful natures as well as men of divisive and violent natures. In the film Dances With Wolves, we are exposed to two distinct categories of people inhabiting post civil war America, the white man and the Native American....   [tags: Movies Native Americans History Papers]
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2081 words
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Dances With Wolves - The film, Dances with Wolves, staring Kevin Costner gives a historically accurate presentation of the Sioux Indians and their way of life. In this production, Lieutenant John Dunbar, played by Costner, is rewarded for his heroic actions in the Civil War by being offered an opportunity to see the American frontier before it is gone. Dunbar is assigned to an abandoned fort where his only friends are a lone wolf and his beloved horse, Cisco. After several weeks of waiting for more American troops, a Sioux Indian makes contact with Dunbar and reports this finding to his chief....   [tags: essays research papers] 1119 words
(3.2 pages)
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Dances with Wolves - Dances with Wolves The movie Dances with Wolves was a real good movie and I enjoyed watching it. It showed how life was back in the time of the Civil War. The movie also showed how Indians lived and how they respect everything except the white men. I think you should keep on showing this movie to your other classes. When you showed this movie, all the kids in class paid attention to it and actually learned something from it because it caught there attention unlike other movies we have seen....   [tags: essays research papers] 424 words
(1.2 pages)
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Dances With Wolves - Dances With Wolves Dances with Wolves offers a cinematic portrayal of Native Americans that is quite contrary to the stereotypical norm. In this film, John Dunbar, goes out to the west where he meets and becomes friends with the Sioux Indians. He is drawn more and more into their community and eventually chooses to side with the humane Indians over his fellow cruel white Americans. In an attempt to change stereotypical views, director Kevin Costner through Dunbar, presents to the audience a different perspective of Indian removal....   [tags: Movie Film Native Americans Papers]
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1312 words
(3.7 pages)
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Dances with wolves - The movie Dances with wolves is a movie that depicted the Indians in an unstereotypical way. Everybody in this time thought of the Indians as thieves, beggars, and savages. They took over other people’s land and killed the buffalo. I know that a lot of people have misunderstood, mistreated, or misjudged someone in their lifetime. All people are worthy of respect, you cannot just judge by first instinct or by what others say. Americans back then were small minded, revengeful, prejudiced, and swayed by rumor very easily....   [tags: essays research papers] 588 words
(1.7 pages)
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Representations of Native Americans in Dances with Wolves and The Searchers - “Film is more than the instrument of a representation; it is also the object of representation. It is not a reflection or a refraction of the ‘real’; instead, it is like a photograph of the mirrored reflection of a painted image.” (Kilpatrick) Although films have found a place in society for about a century, the labels they possess, such as stereotypes which Natives American are recognized for, have their roots from many centuries ago (Kilpatrick). The Searchers, a movie directed by John Ford and starred by John Wayne, tells the story of a veteran of the American Civil War and how after his return home he would go after the maligned Indians who killed his family and kidnapped his younger n...   [tags: Film, Native American Studies, Movies]
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1386 words
(4 pages)
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Dances With Wolves Analysis - Dances With Wolves Analysis The movie "Dances With Wolves" was produced in 1990 and directed by Kevin Costner who starred as the main character. "Dances with Wolves" tells us the story of a white man who gets acquainted with the Sioux, who learns to love and respect them as valuable people with a culture and who discovers how wrong white people's preconceived ideas about Native Americans are. A sense of adventure and drama is the feeling "Dances with Wolves" gives us. With this movie, Costner made his debut as a film director....   [tags: Movies Native Americans History Papers]
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2122 words
(6.1 pages)
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Undoing Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves - Undoing Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves Hollywood has helped create and perpetuate many different stereotypical images of the different races in the world. Those stereotypes still continue to affect the way we think about each other today and many of those stereotypes have been proven to be historically inaccurate. The movie Dances With Wolves, directed by actor Kevin Costner, does an excellent job in attempting to promote a greater acceptance, understanding, and sympathy towards Native American culture, instead of supporting the typical stereotype of Native Americans being nothing but brutal, blood thirsty savages....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1218 words
(3.5 pages)
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Overcoming Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves - Overcoming Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves Everyone has a preconceived opinion of how a certain ethnic group is in terms of the way they live, the morals they hold, the way they deal with people different from them, and how they deal with one another. We come to these conclusions by what we have seen in the media, heard from other people, or actually experienced ourselves. Most people would consider these opinions to be stereotypes. Dances with Wolves is a motion picture that deals with and touches on all sides of personal stereotypes we as American and American Indians have about each other....   [tags: Movie Film Essays] 1780 words
(5.1 pages)
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Dances with Wolves Gives Amazing Portrayal White and Indian Love Story - Summary The film "Dances With Wolves" is about the relationship between a Civil War fighter and a band of Souix Indians. The film opens on an especially dull note, as despairing Union lieutenant John W. Dunbar endeavors to slaughter himself on a suicide mission, however rather turns into an unintentional saint. His activities lead to his reassignment to a remote post in remote South Dakota, where he experiences the Sioux. Pulled in by the common straightforwardness of their lifestyle, he decides to abandon his previous life to go along with them, tackling the name Dances with Wolves....   [tags: civil war, souix, native americans]
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624 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Compareison Between When The Legends Die And Dances With Wolves - Symbolism In the novel When the Legends Die and in the film Dances with Wolves symbolism is very important. Throughout both of them the used symbols are very similar but have very different meanings. In the movie, Dances with Wolves the wolf, Two Socks, and the horse, Cisco, are animal symbols, like the bear in When the Legends Die. Two Socks and Cisco are the main two symbols in Dances with Wolves. Two Socks, is the wolf that befriends John Dunbar symbolizing the Sioux Indians who start trying to also befriend John....   [tags: essays research papers] 409 words
(1.2 pages)
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Understanding Native Americans in the Film, Dances with Wolves - Understanding Native Americans in the Film, Dances with Wolves To dance with someone is to become one with him. When you dance, you lay selves aside and you try to move as one person. Every step flows cautiously into the next. You never want to step on the toes of the other person and with your hands you guide each other in various directions, but always together. The dance is a journey; one that brings two often very different people together. For that brief time that the two are dancing they act as one person, laying all differences aside....   [tags: Movie Film Essays] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Dunbar’s Identification with Indians in the Film, Dances with Wolves - Dunbar’s Identification with Indians in the Film, Dances with Wolves In the film Dances with Wolves, the settlers view the Indians as primitive and uncivilized creatures. Dunbar, played by Kevin Costner, needs a change of pace so he decides to go to the "furthest outpost." Upon arriving at his post, he gradually realizes that the Indians are just as scared of him as he is of them. Soon Dunbar identifies with their way of life and in the end has to choose to live either as a settler or as an Indian....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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836 words
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Changing Native American Stereotypes in the Film, Dances with Wolves - Changing Native American Stereotypes in the Film, Dances with Wolves The film Dances with Wolves, that was written by Michael Blake and directed by Kevin Costner, helps to shift our perspective of Native Americans from one of stereotypical distaste, to one of support and respect. According to an anonymous critic on www.eFilmcritic.com "This is one of the few westerns that devotes its time to looking at the plight of the American Indians (particularly the Sioux), who were thought by some as even more subhuman than blacks during the 1800's (and even during parts of the 1900's)." It has always been thought that Native Americans of old were savage, non-feeling, unemotional, cold-blooded kille...   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1552 words
(4.4 pages)
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Positive Portrayal of Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves - Positive Portrayal of Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves The film Dances With Wolves, attempts to change our stereotypical view of Native Americans, as savage and uncivilized people, by allowing us to see life from their perspective, helping us to realize that many of their experiences are not all that different from our own. The main setting of the film is the Great Western Plains of North Dakota. John Dunbar comes to discover the west before it is completely destroyed through settlement and what he actually finds is a group of people that he comes to understand and love, for all of the qualities that he finds within their individual lives....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1845 words
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Shifting Views on Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves - Shifting Views on Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves A wounded soldier lay on an operation table. The scene is surely not that unusual. 150 years ago, the medical field dealt with gangrene and infections by amputating any wounded limb. Now John Dunbar finds himself in almost the same situation. On a stroke of luck, as it would turn out, the doctor feels to tired to complete the operation on Dunbar and decides to finish for the day before taking his leg off. In the moments that followed, a frustrated, confused and disillusioned Dunbar pulls his boots back on and stumbles back onto the battle field....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1792 words
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Dunbar’s Perspective on the Indians in the Film Dances with Wolves - Dunbar’s Perspective on the Indians in the Film Dances with Wolves This film starts out with a wounded Civil War Veteran at war, named John Dunbar, who shows characteristics of loyalty, honor, courage, fearlessness, and strong will. After healing from his wounds, a general, who had clearly lost his mind, sent him further in the West to make post. On his way there, he and the carriage man Timmons, saw unsightly and brutally body remains, that only Native Americans left behind after their slaughter....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1027 words
(2.9 pages)
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Changing the Stereotypical View of Native Americans in the Movie, Dances With Wolves - Changing the Stereotypical View of Native Americans in the Movie, Dances With Wolves The movie Dances With Wolves begins with John Dunbar in the medic tent awaiting his leg to be cut off because of an injury and the fear of it getting gangrene. He manages to keep it when the doctors say they are too tired to work on another patient. Dunbar then decides that he wants to keep his leg when he sees one of the other soldiers hobbling around. After leaving the tent, he found that there had been no push by either side in the battle they were in, so he decided to ride a horse right in front of enemy lines in an attempt to get it started and to die....   [tags: Movie Film Essays] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
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White Man’s Prejudice against Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves - White Man’s Prejudice against Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves The Movie "Dances With Wolves" shows the stereotypical view of American Indians as uncivilized savages who murder innocent settlers, but most Indians are kind, caring people who were driven from their homes and land as discovered by John Dunbar, the film's main character. John Dunbar was stationed at a small abandoned fort located in the Great Plains where he was to monitor the activity of wildlife and Indians. He first encountered the Indians attempting to steal his horse while he was bathing, and then later again that evening....   [tags: Movie Film Essays] 1108 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Wolves Are Back - “The Wolves Are Back” “…and this is why the caribou and the wolf are one; for the caribou feeds the wolf, but it is the wolf that keeps the caribou strong”― Farley Mowat. This quote is a great example of the wolves keeping balance in nature, and the partnership between two different animals. The gray wolf was reintroduced to Yellowstone in 1995. They were reintroduced by the government due to the endangerment of their species. The reintroduction of the gray wolf was beneficial because it improved Yellowstone’s ecosystem, protected the wolves, and it attracted tourists....   [tags: wolves decline in yellowstone]
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834 words
(2.4 pages)
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Wolves vs Humans - ... These horror films do an excellent job in taking the most negative aspects of a wolf: killer, uncontrollable, vicious, blood thirsty etc. and present them to their audiences in the hopes of giving them a good fright, which many do. In many of these werewolf horror films women and children, fall prey to the blood thirst of this uncontrollable killer. These individuals can be categorized as the submissive and vulnerable roles. The man who falls victim to the bite of the rabid wolf is also placed within the role of submissive and vulnerable....   [tags: hunter, the hunted, wolves] 1779 words
(5.1 pages)
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An Analysis of Singing to Wolves - An Analysis of “Singing to Wolves” The poem, “Singing to Wolves” is a modern poem, that tries to explain to the reader how wonderful solitude is, but also considers it’s negative side, with the example of a lonely girl. The poem starts off with a brief encounter into the history of Wales, and talks about the Llanthony monks, who the reader is told were unloved by the Welsh, and thus driven to a lonely life in the wilderness. By reading this poem, it seems as though being unloved is a popular reason for solitude....   [tags: Singing to Wolves] 930 words
(2.7 pages)
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Traditional African Dances - On Thursday April 18, we watched a film by , about traditional African dance. I was amazed by the different dances performed and how they all held a strong symbol for the tribe they represent. The film portrayed various different tribes performing different dances for different reasons. The narrator of the film was extremely helpful with his descriptions of the people and the dances they were performing. I really enjoyed the costumes of the different tribes, especially the Bobo tribe. They dyed their costumes bright vibrant colors....   [tags: tribal dances] 422 words
(1.2 pages)
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Reasons why Wolves Tend to Live in Packs - The largest member of the canine family is the wolf, the ancestor of almost all dogs known today. The males can get up to 95-99 lbs. and the females can get up to 79-85 lbs. Wolves tend to live together in groups called packs, a group of animals living and hunting together, a pack on average consists of 5-11 wolves at a time. There are 1-2 adults, 3-6 juveniles, and 1-3 yearlings, and sometimes you will find one or more families grouping together to make a bigger pack. Wolves are very territorial animals and don’t like it when strangers start wandering around their area....   [tags: wolf pack, canine family, wolves]
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Wolves, Wild, Again - Wolves, Wild, Again For my last web paper, I thought I'd return to one of my childhood obsessions - wolves. Ever since seeing a cartoon rendition of the story "Mowgli's Brothers" from The Jungle Book (the real thing, not the horrible Disney "interpretations" of it) I fell in love with the idea of wolf-hood. Wolves were once an essential part of our "American culture" and although we drove them away and killed them off in our own country long ago, their importance in the American mind has not decreased....   [tags: Animals Wolves Nature Essays]
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1324 words
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Gender Roles in Angela Carter's The Company of Wolves - Gender Roles in Angela Carter's The Company of Wolves In her transformation of the well-known fable "Little Red Riding Hood," Angela Carter plays upon the reader's familiarity. By echoing elements of the allegory intended to scare and thus caution young girls, she evokes preconceptions and stereotypes about gender roles. In the traditional tale, Red sticks to "the path," but needs to be rescued from the threatening wolf by a hunter or "woodsman." Carter retells the story with a modern perspective on women....   [tags: Carter Company of Wolves Essays]
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812 words
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Kill the Wolves - Kill the Wolves Bang. A shot rings out in the forest. “Another one down. That’s five this week.” In the early 1900s there were predator extermination teams that were paid for every wolf, mountain lion, and bear they brought dead to the ranger station. Why were these stopped. “It’s those damn tree-huggers again.” Reintroducing Wolves into the southwest is the biggest mistake the government has made in several years. Farmers and ranchers suffer some of the most losses from wolves out of anyone in our society....   [tags: Wolved Wildlife Animals Essays] 633 words
(1.8 pages)
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Ghost Dances, by Christopher Bruce - The work ‘Ghost Dances’ by Christopher Bruce was viewed on 26th August, 2011 to the Year 12 Dance class. The individual interpretation of the social/political or world issue/ comment the piece is attempting to make. Using direct examples from the performance, the use the choreographer has made of the movement and the non-movement components have been identified. Also the effectiveness of this piece has been evaluated. After Christopher Bruce received a letter from a widow of a Chilean folk singer who had been murdered the very inspirational and symbolic ‘Ghost Dances’ work came about....   [tags: Interpretation, Motivation, Breakdown]
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To Hunt or to Save Our Wolves - ... These are a couple of the reasons my sources are writing about. Besides, wolf hunters aren’t as bad as everyone thinks. The wolf hunters aren’t exactly just killing wolves for fun, trophy hunts, or cause its something to do. Some hunt them to keep them off their territory. (B). What does this mean. It is so that wolves know not to attack their animals. Some people might say that wolves wouldn’t understand that but wolves are very smart and, can adapt very fast to understand that if you go there you can get hurt....   [tags: parks, endangered list, survival] 884 words
(2.5 pages)
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Wolves in the Wild and Their Place in Nature - Your children are starving, the winter is approaching and it is your responsibility to feed your family, their extended family, and the entire pack. Under these circumstances even you would kill an elk or two. In 1995, 14 wolves were brought from Canada into the Yellowstone National Park, in an effort to see how they would affect the ecosystem if they were reintroduced into America. The two decades after the wolves were integrated into the park has been filled with conflict as citizens fight for or against reintroducing wolves country-wide....   [tags: yellow stone, ]
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1131 words
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The Effects of Wolves on Game Populations - The reintroduction of wolves has effected game a crossed the western Rockies. In many ways wolves have been a negative influence. They have caused problems in many wild game populations, including deer, elk, and many more. What has caused these problems, how do wolves hunt, and how do we control them. The original wolves were very different from the ones that were planted. So while environmentalists thought they were helping to level out environmental problems, they succeeded in doing the opposite, by bringing back the wrong kind of wolves they started, depleting elk populations, and wild game....   [tags: environmental measures and effects] 1059 words
(3 pages)
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Ninemile Wolves by Rick Bass - ... One pup escaped, and then was captured; the other two died of starvation. The Montana Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Preservation asked the USFWS to remove the pups because they might affect Montana's biggest cash crop: deer hunters. The USFWS declined, and soon the orphan pack had taught itself to hunt, but freedom was short-lived. When two heifers were found killed, the USFWS tranquilized the pack and relocated the wolves. At their new home, two were shot by ranchers, and the last female was placed in permanent captivity....   [tags: non-fiction story analysis] 675 words
(1.9 pages)
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Reintroducing Wolves to Yellowstone and Idaho - 1914 began the official war of the wolves. This year Congress officially approves funds for the eradication of wolves, cougars, and other destructive animals. Wolves were declared destructive to agricultural and big game interests and formally hunted. Nearly a century later, in 1995, wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and Idaho's Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness(Phillips, 1996, p.20). The reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone National Park did not end the debate of whether wolves should stay or go....   [tags: Wolf Reintroduction]
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956 words
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Wolves: Keeping Nature in Balance - Everyone knows of the apocryphal evil that is wolves, hunting our children, killing our livestock, taking the best deer. Having a wolf hunting season seems like a no brainer, right. But what if that’s not how wolves are, what if they are innocent, so to say. Should they be hunted. The short answer is no. There should not be a wolf hunting season because many of the thoughts on wolves are incorrect; hunting would compromise wolf studies, and the population is already suffering. We have all heard of the Big Bad Wolf, stalking children and spreading fear and chaos....   [tags: Ecology]
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1047 words
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Wolves: Great Hunters and Scouts - Spirituality is a driving force for many humans’ decisions and many Native Americans have found their spirituality in the animal kingdom. Vine Deloria Jr., an American Indian author, stated that, “we get most of our knowledge about the world we live in from our surroundings” (Caduto and Bruchac, XI), and as people of the land, Native Americans were in constant tune with their surroundings. The animals that filled their world taught them how to hunt, to gather, to find fresh water, to warn them of upcoming danger, and many other tasks....   [tags: Spirituality, Native Americans, Human's Decisions]
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1450 words
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Protect the Gray Wolves - ... The long term goal for the environmentalists and Yellowstone park rangers would be to have around 1,000 wolves roaming the region. The declining wolf population has turned around and is now increasing at a steady pace. The National Park Service says “During the 1980s, wolves began to reestablish breeding packs in Northwestern Montana; 50-60 wolves inhabited Montana in 1994.”(NPS) We are very fortunate for the quick acts of transferring the wolves from Canada down to the Yellowstone National Park and to the intense research that has been done over the last twenty years....   [tags: hunters, livestock, ranchers] 1993 words
(5.7 pages)
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Grey Wolves in Idaho - In America, many of us have witnessed earth’s most beautiful and natural wonders. Throughout the years many settlers would pick a location based on its natural resources as well as its breath-taking scenery. Most of earth’s inhabitants have visited places such as the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls to revel in its majestic beauty. Sadly, in order to maintain the explosion of human procreation we are forced to cross boundaries with our surrounding environments. This is where issues arise, and we begin to see wildlife intermixing with human life....   [tags: wildlife, habitat, environment, civilization]
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1839 words
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Evolutionary History of Gray Wolves - ... There are 37 recognized subspecies of the gray wolf in total ranging across six continents with familiar names that one typically hears for wolves; such as timber, arctic, plains, Canadian, tundra etc. Origins of the Gray Wolf Many biologists believe that the wolf species evolved from primitive carnivores or carnivoramorphans known as miacids. Miacids had evolved from cretaceous insectivores which had lived alongside dinosaurs during the Cretaceous Period. Although mammals had already existed for tens of millions of years before the dinosaurs in the form of very small rodent-like herbivores, it wasn’t until the extinction of their oppressors (the dinosaurs) about 66 million years ago at...   [tags: canine wildlife species] 946 words
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Creative Writing: Among Wolves - The dew covered forest floor oozes itself between my toes as I try to absorb every ravishing detail of the forest. The rising sun sets its glowing array of color on the rims of the moss-cloaked figures in front of me and the birds warble high above in the crowed of trees to generate a beautiful melody for the atmosphere. Drawing in a deep breath, I analyze each scent, aroma and fragrance of the woods I’ve encircled myself in, each odor bringing me into a more engrossed tranquility. It’s times like these that I long for my unborn inner wolf so I can connect with nature on a closer level....   [tags: personal narrative] 1067 words
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Native Americans and Their Intrinsic Relationship with Western Films - Dances With Wolves, directed by Kevin Costner, and The Searchers, directed by John Ford, looks into the fabric of this country's past. The media has created a false image of the relationship between Native Americans and White men to suppress the cruel and unfortunate reality. Both directors wanted to contradict these stereotypes, but due to the time period the films were created, only one film was successful. Unlike The Searchers, Dancing With Wolves presents a truly realistic representation of Native Americans....   [tags: Native Americans ] 941 words
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Reintroducing Wolves to Yellowstone National Park - ... When they brought the wolves back to the park, there was not just an effect on one species or one area but rather they affected the entire ecosystem of the area. I will discuss their effects on areas such elk, beaver colonies, scavengers, aspen trees, willow trees and cottonwood trees. Once the wolves were brought back into Yellowstone, immediately the elk population began decreasing. This was due to the elk comprising of about 92% of the wolves diet (White-et-al 2005). Researchers expected a 5-30 % decrease after the wolves were reintroduced however the actual observed was much more than that (White-et-al 2005)....   [tags: environmental breakthroughs] 711 words
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Wolves: An Excellent Example for Dominance Behavior - Wolves provide an excellent example for dominance behavior and the interactions within social groups. Researchers such as L.D. Mech spend their lives observing the behaviors of wolves in order to better understand leadership and dominance behavior across species. Because displays of leadership and dominance differ between wolves living in the wild and wolves living in captivity, examining both allows a greater understanding of both types of behavior. Wolves in the wild form packs in which one male and one female, considered “alphas,” preside over the pack and act as its leaders....   [tags: social interactions among animals] 561 words
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Golden Eagles and Gray Wolves Reproduction - ... The female does most of the babysitting, which is for warmth, protection, or cover young with the wings or body and feeding of the offsprings, while the male supply the female and the young with all the food they need, especially in the early stages of life for the offsprings. She baby sits the chicks almost non-stop for the first two weeks. After this, she will regularly leave the nest and share the hunting with the male. The Offspring will fledge when they are about 65-70 days old, and will become independent after 90-100 days....   [tags: offsprings, monogamous, eggs]
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“Indian Classical Dances; Bharatanatyam the Elite Form” - There are eight individual and unique classical dances in India. Each has its own distinctive dance movements, make-up, and costumes. The classical dance forms that have developed in India all have set rules which have been followed traditionally over the years. This set of rules that the classical dances follow is called the Natya Shastra. This is the ancient text that all Indian classical dances obey by in order for them to be called a “classic”. The eight forms that have succeeded in reaching the conventions of the Natya Shastra are: the Bharatanatyam, Kuchipudi, Kathakali, Kathak, Manipuri, Odissi, Mohiniyattam, and Sattriya....   [tags: Dance]
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Dancing With Wolves - 1. The film Dancing with Wolves takes place in South Dakota in 1863. John Dunbar is the main character who hurts his leg in battle and is sent to the frontier on a new mission as a Lieutenant. When Dunbar arrives in South Dakota he is there alone, no one else had made their way their yet. Dunbar gradually starts to live with the Indians and become one of them getting the name Dancing with Wolves. Another main character is Standing with a Fist, who marries Dancing with Wolves. Standing with a Fist is an American who was captured but the Indians when was very young....   [tags: essays research papers] 643 words
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Breathalyzers at School Dances - Recently at Longmeadow High School it became mandatory to pass an “alcohol-screening test” before entering a school dance. This breathalyzer will detect alcohol on one’s breath. No student that has been drinking will be admitted to the event. Longmeadow High School has recently purchased breathalyzers which teacher chaperones administer to all students entering a school function. This issue has brought about much conflict. Many people see it as a positive thing; however, the breathalyzer at school dances should be eliminated....   [tags: essays research papers] 881 words
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Should the Wolves Stay in Yellowstone National Park? - Should the Wolves Stay in Yellowstone National Park. National Parks are the cornerstone of every country because it preserves the rich cultural and natural resources of a nation, such as Yellowstone in the United States of America. Yellowstone National Park is the World’s First National Park which brings millions of attraction each year, it is larger than Rhode Island and Delaware combine and have over a thousand species of plants and animal (Yellowstone Media). However, a very important type of species has been missing in Yellowstone National Park for a very long time....   [tags: Conservation]
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Wolves: The Things You Didn’t Know - Canis Lupus, the Latin term for the “North American Wolf”. A meat eating mammal with the capability of weighing up to 180 pounds and reaching a height of sixty-three inches, the wolf is easily the largest member of the canine family. Over 500,000 wolves once lived in harmony, roaming the Northern Americas alongside the Native American tribes and the rest of the ecosystem. Wolves live in packs, a pack essentially being a family. While the average size of a pack is six to ten, the largest confirmed pack recorded in North America can be found in Yellowstone National Park where the “Druid Pack” numbers thirty-seven strong and counting....   [tags: Canine Family, Canis Lupus, Mammal, Carnivore]
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Wolves - Wolves The wolf was once a much slandered animal. In the western world, people feared and hated wolves, and this legacy is reflected in stories such as Little Red Riding Hood and The Boy Who Cried Wolf. In these popular children's tales the wolf is made out to be a prowler and a killer of livestock and people. There is some basis for The Boy Who Cried Wolf, for wolves have killed cattle and sheep. But what of Little Red Riding Hood. There are no records of wolves killing humans in Canada or the United States....   [tags: essays research papers] 1957 words
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re-introduction of wolves into maine - Reentering the eastern timber wolf into northern Maine. Before the 20th century the eastern timber wolf lived and thrived in northern and central Maine. A combination of hunting and trapping however killed off most of the indigenous wolves and drove the rest into Canada. The eastern timber wolf stands between 26”- 36” tall, and weighs between 65- 85 pounds for a female and 80- 95 pounds for a male. They stretch from between 5- 6.5 feet from nose to tale. The eastern timber wolf travels in packs of 2-8....   [tags: essays research papers] 685 words
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Restoring Wolves to Yellowstone - Restoring Wolves to Yellowstone In his book, Never Cry Wolf, Farley Mowat tells an Inuit tale, saying that in the beginning, caribou were created for humans to hunt. However, humans “hunted only the big, fat caribou, for they had no wish to kill the weak and the small and the sick,” creating a weak population of caribou. The creator then made wolves to eat the sick, weak, and small caribou, creating a natural health and balance to the earth (124). Humans have traditionally seen wolves as a competitor and a danger, but these misconceptions can now be put to rest....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Review: Star Wolves 3: Civil War - Introduction: I love games with spaceships in them, and have played almost every game for the PC with a spaceship in it since the mid 1980’s. Why am I bringing this up. Because the game I’m reviewing in, Star Wolves 3: Civil War, is just littered with spaceships. Does that make me more biased, or maybe more critical. It’s hard to say, but as someone who really enjoyed the previous two Star Wolves installments, I was pretty thrilled to take a crack at this new one. Let’s dive in and take a look, shall we....   [tags: Video Game Review] 1478 words
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Imagination Leads to Subservience in Pan's Labyrinth and The Company of Wolves - ... Ofelia says, “You are helping the men in the woods, aren’t you?” Mercedes replies, “Have you told anyone?” Ofelia responds, “No, I haven’t. I do not want anything bad to happen to you” (Pan’s Labyrinth). The housekeeper has gained Ofelia’s trust and now is able to cover her treason from Captain Vidal. Secondly, Ofelia’s mother also uses Ofelia for her convenience. In the beginning of the movie, Carmen is against Ofelia believing in fairy tales. She believes Ofelia is wasting her time. Later in the movie, she asks Ofelia to tell her brother fairytales to calm him down....   [tags: escaping reality, movies comparison ] 1975 words
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Needing Wolves in Yellowstone - Needing Wolves in Yellowstone WHY THERE HAVE BEEN NO WOLVES IN YELLOWSTONE: A Brief History Around 1930, the last wolf was spotted in the Yellowstone Area by a paid hunter, he got a shot off but his aim was not true. That was the last recorded sighting of a gray wolf in the Yellowstone Park land. From 1918 to 1935 government scouts recorded killing 35 mountain lions, 2,968 coyotes and 114 wolves (Phillips 1996). Those are total numbers, since a wolf hadn't been seen since 1930, the 114 wolves had been exterminated in the early 1920's....   [tags: Yellowstone National Park Wildlife Essays]
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Wolves: An Unwanted Predator - Wolves: An Unwanted Predator Vigorous as a predator, affectionate toward its pack, the gray wolf elicits both fear and admiration among humans. This fear, along with ignorance, inspired a movement to eradicate the gray wolf from the lower forty-eight states in the early 1900’s. By the early 1930’s, gray wolf populations had been completely eliminated from the Rocky Mountains (Bangs, et al 147). In 1973, congress passed the Endangered Species Act that protected any wolves that naturally migrated from Canada (Bangs, et al 147)....   [tags: Wildlife Animals Gray Wolf Essays]
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African Wild Dogs: The Lives and Loss of the Painted Wolves - African Wild Dogs, or Lycaon pictus, are indigenous to many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. They, along with wolves and domesticated dogs, are classified in the kingdom Animalia, phylum Chordata, class Mammalia, order Carnivora, and family Canidae, so all three species share many similar characteristics (Woodroffe & Sillero-Zubiri, 2012). Lycaon pictus translates to “painted wolf,” referring to the unique brown, gold, black, and white mottling of their coats which allows recognition of individuals....   [tags: Lycaon Pictus, Wild Dogs, Sub Saharan Africa]
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Our Fear of Wolves - Our Fear of Wolves Wolf. What is the first thought that enters one’s mind upon the utterance of that word. More than likely it is the image of a hairy, razor-sharp toothed beast awaiting the thrill of its next merciless kill. Unfortunately, this stereotypical image has been embalmed within the human psyche of the Western civilization for hundreds of years. Most have never even seen a wolf, yet human’s fear of the animal is seemingly as natural as being afraid of the dark. Might these fears be caused by the mind’s interpretation of the literature and stories that have been told over the centuries....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Culture of India: Types of Rituals, Dances, Jewelry, Languages, People, and Customs - India’s culture is very diverse. One may call it strange, weird, or even bizarre. The culture of India includes: different types of rituals, dances, jewelry, languages, people, and different customs. India’s culture is very beautiful and distinguishable. From rituals to languages the culture of India is amazing and full of life. The rituals in India are very unique. They are rituals for religion, Jain, and Sikh. There are many more rituals which contribute to India’s customs and culture. Those were just a handful of the rituals there, they are many more....   [tags: india's culture, hindu rituals, indians]
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Analysis of Western Film - Analysis of Western Film introduction The two films we chose were dances with wolves starring Kevin costner it was made in 1990 and the searchers starring john Wayne it was made in 1950 they both show native Americans been represented in different ways. The searchers Native Americans are portrayed as being stupid for swapping a woman for a hat with a feather in it. In the movie we see a native American man giving a man a woman and taking a hat with a feather in it. This shows they are stupid and they don’t have any love for anyone....   [tags: Papers] 519 words
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How many wolves are too many? - In 1922 the federal government passed a law that allowed wolves in Yellowstone National Park to be hunted. In just four years later the last wolf was hunted. In 1995, the gray wolf was reintroduced to the park. The government started off by introducing 31 wolves in the Montana and Wyoming parts of the park. Now 116 wolves now live and more then 75 pups. The controversy surrounding the reintroduction of the wolves are many from both sides. Some local farmers are against it because some wolves hunt their animals....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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How the Dependance upon Tourism Have Affected Bali in a Positive and Negative Way - ... The dirty water from trash has also affected the fishes and living organisms that live in the ocean water. The tourist has not only made bali’s water more limited but, it has also affected some of the water that was supposed to go to the paddy fields. The local water has been redirected from going to paddy fields and is being used for tourism instead affecting the growth of plants grown on the paddy fields. Animals in bali like monkeys and birds are also affected. Pollution is growing from tourism too....   [tags: pollution, culture, traditional dances]
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The Unreasonable Fear of Wolves in Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat - ... Mowat begins to realize that wolves are the scapegoats to the real reason the caribou population is declining. When Mowat meets Mike, a trapper living in Canada, Mike tells him some surprising information and says. “ ‘Every trapper got to the same, ’ he said. ‘Kill maybe two, three hundred, maybe more’ …To a man, the trappers and traders denied that they killed more than one or two caribou a year; they had insisted that wolves slaughtered the deer in untold thousands” (Mowat 128). The wolves are repeatedly blamed for being the vicious killers who are responsible for every slaughter and kill that occur in the tundra....   [tags: trappers, slaughter, misunderstanding] 956 words
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Domestication of Other Wild Animals - With the domestication of wolves came the floppy ears, playfulness, colored coats, and barking of the dog we know and love today. Interestingly enough, when an experiment was performed on silver foxes these same traits appeared after domestication. Belyaev, a Russian geneticist, conducted this experiment by breeding the tamer foxes. Belyaev bred twenty generations of the tamest foxes until the foxes resembled dogs more than they resembled foxes. In the wild there is no artificial selection so dog domestication definitely took a lot longer....   [tags: foxes, wolves, dogs, species]
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Sherman Alexie A Native American Writer - Sherman Alexie has made a name for himself as a prolific contemporary Native American writer, taking inspiration from his own past and experiences with modern Indian life. While there are many enduring themes throughout Alexie's writings: Native identity, modern reservation life, alcohol abuse etc. when it comes to his collection War Dances, the most apparent motif is fatherhood. Community and family are the heart of Native American cultures, with the father archetype holding great honor and expectation....   [tags: fatherhood, war dances]
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Agricultural and Ecological Role of the Honey Bee - ... The round dance only has one component. Bees run one way in the circle, stops and then run the other way (Waddington, 1982). Honey bees can also use trophallaxis or the exchange of food to communicate a range of information. Trophallaxis is mainly used to communicate the need for water, the quality of food sources, temperature, and the condition of the queen (Korst et al., 1982). Primer pheromones are another form of communication used by the western honey bee to distribute labor efficiently....   [tags: waggle dances, communication, odor] 1962 words
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The Music of the Prohibition Era in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald - "The lights grow brighter as the earth lurches away from the sun, and now the orchestra is playing yellow cocktail music, and the opera of voices pitches a key higher. Laughter is easier minute by minute, spilled with prodigality, tipped out at a cheerful word. The groups change more swiftly, swell with new arrivals, dissolve and form in the same breath; already there are wanderers, confident girls who weave here and there among the stouter and more stable, become for a sharp, joyous moment the centre of a group, and then, excited with triumph, glide on through the sea-change of faces and voices and color under the constantly changing light" (Fitzgerald 41)....   [tags: cocktail music, jazz, dances]
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St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves, by Karen Russel - Whether one would like to admit it or not, change is a difficult and not to mention uncomfortable experience which we all must endure at one point in our lives. A concept that everyone must understand is that change does not occur immediately, for it happens overtime. It is necessary for time to pass in order for a change to occur, be it days, weeks, months, or even years. The main character, who is also the narrator of “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves”, realizing that “things felt less foreign in the dark” (Russell 225), knows that she will be subject to change very soon....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Change] 938 words
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Review of Wolves and the Ecology of Fear: Can Predation Risk Structure Ecosystems? - In this article, authors William Ripple and Robert Beschta focus on the issue of predation and the way it affects biodiversity and otherwise alters ecosystems. While many other studies have stressed the lethal effects of predation by carnivores, the authors of this study have chosen to focus on how nonlethal outcomes of predation affect the structure and function of ecosystems. The authors give two main objectives to their study: first to provide a short synthesis of the potential ecosystem responses to predation risk in a three-level trophic cascade involving large carnivores, hoofed animals, and vegetation; and secondly to present research that centers on wolves, elk, and woody browse spec...   [tags: Ecology] 744 words
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Karen Russell's St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised By Wolves" - “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves”, by Karen Russell is the story of a pack of human girls who were born of werewolves. They are taken from their families in the wilderness and brought to a St. Lucy’s. It was here that they were to be civilized. The process of civilization involved stripping them of their personal and cultural identities and retraining them in a manner that was acceptable to the human world. This is a close analogy to the Residential Schools of Cultural Assimilation for native Americans from 1887 to the early 1950’s....   [tags: cultural assimilation, process of civilization]
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The Domestication of Dogs - ... Dog breeds are thought to be classified when humans discovered the most useful traits of the dog. The Romans are thought to be the first to classify these dogs. Some classifications involve house dogs, shepherd dogs, sporting dogs, and war dogs. Evidence suggests that the dog has lived in most parts of the world over time. There are two main categories that make the dogs what they are, the first is how the dogs are all over the world, and in close association with humans, and the second is the many amounts of variation between subspecies....   [tags: wolves, breeds, dna] 837 words
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