Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "Constitution"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
The Creation Of The Constitution - In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
An Essay on the Constitution - After gaining independence, Americans created a unique government. Purposefully diverging from the seams of a monarchial government, Americans created a new one from the ideas of republicanism. Under the Articles of Confederation, the power was given to the states as opposed to a centralized government. However, this made it difficult to raise revenue. Without the power to tax, congress could not pay back debts. Also, needing nine out thirteen votes from the states to pass a law made it almost nearly impossible to get anything done....   [tags: American Constitution] 1036 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Shaping of the U.S. Constitution - In the initial years of the United States a meeting of delegates appointed by the several states met for the sole purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation. The result of this meeting was the creation of the U.S. Constitution that would soon become the ultimate directive for both Federal and State Governments. Since its birth it has been revised, amended, and ratified in order to solidify the allocation of power between the separate branches of government. Although this may be the case, distribution of the powers has been disputed ever since the formation of the Constitution....   [tags: U.S. constitution, nullification crisis]
:: 4 Works Cited
2052 words
(5.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The U.S. Constitution and Slavery - The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didn’t abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself “ all men are created equal” but he owned slaves. The founding father didn’t look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution....   [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ] 408 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Similarities and Differences of the US and Iraqi Constitution - As stated in the first paper; The Constitution of the United States was designed to be a framework for the organization of our country’s government. Many foreign countries also have constitutions, which outline the rights of individuals and the powers of the law; such as the Iraqi Constitution of 2005. I will compare the similarities and differences of the US and Iraqi Constitutions and discuss Articles 2, 36, 39, & 90 and women’s rights of the Iraqi Constitution. Some similarities of the two Constitutions are evident in the laws of the legal system....   [tags: religion, government, us constitution]
:: 3 Works Cited
1184 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The UK Constitution and Its Effect on the UK's Actions in Syria - A constitution sets out the basic rules and principle by which a country is to be governed. A constitution covers all institutions that govern the executive, legislature, judiciary and parliament and how they interact together. A constitution defines the rights of citizens and states where the power lies within government. There are two types of constitution, a codified and an uncodified constitution. A codified constitution as found in America, refers to a state or country that has its rules and principles written down in one single document while an uncodified constitution as in Israel and New Zealand have no written laws or principles and is referred to as being an unwritten constitution....   [tags: politics, constitution]
:: 6 Works Cited
1630 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Organization of the Constitution vs. the Articles of Confederation - The Constitution is a very well organized and well thought out document that holds strong bases for the future of America, unlike the Articles of Confederation. The constitution is ultimately more detailed and intricate, giving a less questionable guideline to any future problems which may come to rise. For example, the Articles of Confederation gives us Congress, unicameral. The Constitution gives us Congress, and divides it into the Senate and the House of Representatives, becoming bicameral and more balanced in power....   [tags: Constitution, USA, congress, Articles of Confedera] 469 words
(1.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
A comparison and contrast of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of 1787 - A comparison and contrast of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of 1787. The Articles of Confederation voted on and adopted by the Continental Congress, November 15, 1777 (Carey, 2013). It was the first constitution of America, though complete ratification of the Articles of Confederation by all thirteen states did not take place until March 1, 1781. After some of the states realized that the Articles of Confederation did not adequately resolve the national and international issues that the United States was facing....   [tags: american history, drafting of the constitution]
:: 7 Works Cited
967 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Progression From The Articles of Confederation to The Constitution As a Result of Anti-Federalist, and Federalist Debate - Looking back in history (1781-1787) at the debate over ratification of the Constitution we can see that the making of the constitution was a long drawn out battle between the federalists and the Anti-Federalists. There were concerns as to the inherent weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, such as the lack of action during Shay’s Rebellion, the issue over taxation, as well as the problematic consensus required by all states to change any one of the Articles. There was a fear that if given too much power the executive leader would become like the king they had just fought a revolution to free themselves from....   [tags: American Constitution]
:: 3 Works Cited
3731 words
(10.7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Key to the Protection Against Tyranny in the American Constitution - Tyranny riddles many forms of government, such as oligarchy, absolute monarchy, dictatorship, autocracy, and totalitarianism. In May of 1787, delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia gathered to create a stronger central government -- while avoiding the tyranny that so many other forms of government had allowed for. James Madison, of one those very same delegates, defined tyranny as “The accumulation of all powers...in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many...” in Federalist Paper #47....   [tags: constitution, tyranny, federalism] 1402 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
How Presidents of the United States Overstep their Bounds and Defy the Constitution - Wesley Clark, a former United States Army General and a decorated Vietnam War veteran, states in his book Winning Modern Wars that “Defeating terrorism is more difficult and far-reaching than we have assumed....We may be advancing the ball down the field at will, running over our opponent's defenses, but winning the game is another matter altogether.” He also stated in the preface of the book “that the Bush administration had rushed us, pushed us, mislead, and manipulated us into war with Iraq with at the expense of the real war against Al- Qaeda.” Clark in writing stating this is essentially telling us we (The United States) have somehow overstepped our boundaries by acting in this “War on...   [tags: Politics, Constitution]
:: 2 Works Cited
1653 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Personal Experience: My Understanding of the Transformative Constitution - ... By adding a wealth tax to all white people it will just lead to further poverty and poor socio-economic conditions. In a news24 report it says that evidently there will be no economic gain from wealth taxes. This makes it unclear as to why they would want to make wealth tax a requirement. Rich people already pay a lot of tax. Tax payers are fatigued from the tax they pay every year. People in the SA Revenue are not concerned about collecting more money than they are. This is because even though the government is effective in collecting money they are not effective in spending the money correctly....   [tags: human rights, law, constitution] 1162 words
(3.3 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Effectiveness of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America - In this essay I will be writing about the effectiveness of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America and considering whether they achieved the purpose of making life better for African Americans. I’m going to start this essay by talking about the Amendments and what they were designed to achieve. In total there are 27 amendments to the Constitution, all with different ways to make America better. Around 1791 the first amendments were made but the amendments I will be looking at occurred later....   [tags: US Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
How Democratic is the Constitution? - How Democratic is the Constitution. In the dictionary definition, democracy “is government by the people in which the supreme power is, vested in the people and exercised directly by them or by their elected agents under a free electoral system.” The constitution is a perfect example of this. The first amendment in the Bill of Rights states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Which protects the people's right to practice religion, to speak freely, to assem...   [tags: US Constitution] 756 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The American Constitution - The American Constitution The basis of all law in the United States is the Constitution. This Constitution is a document written by "outcasts" of England. The Constitution of the United States sets forth the nation's fundamental laws. It establishes the form of the national government and defines the rights and liberties of the American people. It also lists the aims of the government and the methods of achieving them. The Constitution was written to organize a strong national government for the American states....   [tags: United States Constitution] 2881 words
(8.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
America's Accountability to its Constitution and the Events at Abu Ghraib - Our constitution is built upon the ideas of freedom and decency. After all, it was written after hundreds of years worth of tyranny both at home in England (at the time), and abroad. People were standing against oppression leveled against them from thousands of miles away (for example, the Boston Tea Party), and they were called traitors to the Crown. Today, if someone speaks out against the US and its oppression, or chooses to fight back, we call him an insurgent or a terrorist. It’s quite a twist....   [tags: constitution, USA, government, Abu Ghraib, ]
:: 5 Works Cited
771 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States            The Preamble states the broad purposes the Constitution is intended to serve - to establish a government that provides for greater cooperation among the States, ensures justice and peace, provides for defense against foreign enemies, promotes the general well-being of the people, and secures liberty now and in the future.      Article I of the Constitution is based on the legislative department. Section 1. Legislative Power; the Congress: is the nations lawmaking body....   [tags: Constitution Summary Essays] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States The United States Constitution is the law of the United States. It is the foundation of this country and the most important document in its history. It provides the guidelines for the government and citizens of the United States. The Constitution will unquestionably continue to carry us into the 22nd century, just as it has for over two hundred years. The principles of the Constitution remain strong to this day, especially with respect to our government and to the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Law Land US History Constitution Government] 1412 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Second Amendment of the Constitution - The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” This timeless phrase, the Second Amendment of the United States’ Constitution, is an enduring example of the principles and ideals that our country was founded on. With this statement, the founders of this country explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 503 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Impact of the Gulf War, September 11th, and the War in Iraq on the U.S. Constitution - The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was completed on September, 1787, with its adoption by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was later ratified by special conventions in each of the original thirteen states. It created a more unified and defined government in place of what was then a group of free and independent states operating under the Articles of Confederation. During its history there have been a numerous number of events which have occurred which have seriously tested this Constitution After conflicts in South Korea, the two World Wars and Vietname the next conflic...   [tags: American Constitution] 1082 words
(3.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Constitution - The preamble introduces the constitution. It states that the government comes from the people. Its general purposes are in order to form a more perfect union we have to “Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.” (Remy, United States Government, McGraw Hill companies, Ohio, 2002) Its purpose is to make a good government and good laws, have peace in our homes, national security, healthy communities, and freedom to ourselves, families and friends....   [tags: Political Science]
:: 5 Works Cited
1031 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing the United States Constitution with Local State Constitutions - The United States Constitution begins with the simple phrase “We the People”. Yet, with three simple words, the ideology it stands for has shaped the entire country (O’Connor et al., 2011). The short phrase signifies that the document, and thus, the government, is based upon the people themselves. The Constitution reflects the culture and ideologies of its citizens. Similarly, state constitutions reflect the people, albeit in a more specific locality. The key differences between the United States Constitution and that of local states are due to the distinctions between the scope and characteristics of the people they govern....   [tags: Government]
:: 4 Works Cited
855 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Father of the Constitution - James Madison most notorious for his title of father of the Constitution was born on March 16, 1751 on a small plantation in Virginia. In his early life James Madison was very sickly suffered from psychosomatic, or stress-induced, seizures that accompanied the treat of Indians attack during the French and Indian War. This all changed James Madison Sr. acquired a good amount of money by marrying the daughter of a rich tobacco merchant Nelly Conway. They moved into the large plantation Montpelier, with seven younger siblings he was very studious and hardworking earning him the chance to study Princeton which was then called The College of New Jersey....   [tags: James Madison]
:: 6 Works Cited
1100 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Need for a Constitution - Why did the U.S.A. rejected the more democratic government for a lesser one. Because the country was either going towards a monarchy or an oligarchy. The Confederation was breaking down and two events made it clear; a failed Treaty with Spain( need date) and Shay’s Rebellion. If the founding fathers didn’t intercede, the U.S. would been dismantled. How could the founding fathers save the Union and “secure the Blessing of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity?” (Constitution) They designed the constitution to rejected the democratic Articles to embrace a constitutional form of a republic government....   [tags: US History, Confederation] 792 words
(2.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Rethinking the Finality of and Democracy in the American Constitution - ... In addition, Dahl (2001) asserted his respect for the Framers, which shows his empathy for those who might initially oppose his arguments. He notes that the Framers are wise: “WISE AS THE FRAMERS WERE, THEY WERE necessarily limited by their profound ignorance” (Dahl, 2001, p.7). He understood that the Framers were respectable for their profound interest for public service, but they were, nevertheless, imperfect human beings who were ignorant on aspects of history and the future. Dahl (2001) does not disrespect the Framers and acknowledge that their wisdom is deep enough to create the innovation that the U.S....   [tags: constitutional concepts, political values]
:: 4 Works Cited
1723 words
(4.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Provisions of the Constitution - "A noble five-point buck, he occupies a third of the width and height of the pictorial design, in the geographical centre of the forefront. Standing erect, head thrown far back, facing east, but with one eye on the audience, his forefeet stand firmly on the motto (Bennett, 2011)." This is what the state seal featured 1863. The final state seal is a testament of the ever changing face of Arizona as a prospector with fields adorns the back. The strong and proud heritage is seen in the constitution itself....   [tags: Government]
:: 4 Works Cited
1590 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Modification of the Constitution - Our country has changed significantly since the Constitution was first published. Changes such as abolishing slavery, suffrage for women and minorities, and changing the voting age to 18. The Framers of the Constitution could not possibly predict the future of our country at the time. Everything in our government is based on the Constitution and with a changing country the document that governs us should be changed as well. I’m an advocate of the democratic and efficiency critique and that is why I believe the United States should change its Constitution because it gives too much power to the central government, it allows for winner take-all elections, and fails to take adequate responsibili...   [tags: government accountability, democracy promotion] 1050 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Constitution of Japan - Plan of Investigation The Constitution of Japan contains articles about equality between men and women but many times, law is not properly enforced or enacted. Keeping this in mind, the true extent to which the federal legislation actually augmented women's freedoms needs to be analyzed. This is why the subject of my research is, "To what extent did the Japanese Constitution result in greater freedom and increased rights for Japanese women in the mid twentieth century?" The scope of this research is valuable because it examines the development of feminism in Japan, which empowered women and explains the development of equal rights....   [tags: politcs, equality]
:: 14 Works Cited
1778 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Validity of the Constitution - Manifest Destiny was the vigorous force of nationalism that steered the United States onto a path of territorial expansion and war. The ramifications of the Mexican War included a new set of troubling and divisive issues. Through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the United States acquired a vast new territories. The ultimate question would be centered upon the status of slavery in these newly organized territories. Ironically, the relentless westward expansion which seemed to draw the nation together inevitably reinstated bitter controversies that haunted the stability of the Union....   [tags: expansion, slavery, political] 1304 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Amendments to the Constitution - The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Does the Constitution Guarantee the Right To Clone? - Does the Constitution guarantee the right to clone. Recent scientific innovations, and projected legislation, have raised questions about the character of the constitutional right to fruitful freedom, and above all, concerning whether or not there's a constitutional “right to clone.” (Cass R. Sunstein) For functions of substantive due process of law, the primary question is whether or not the proper to clone counts as a basic right, one with that the government will interfere solely to safeguard a “compelling” interest....   [tags: constitutional right, cloning, embryo]
:: 5 Works Cited
2408 words
(6.9 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Constitution - Every society has certain standards which ensure that its members' actions do not harm the same society. There are two types of standards, Verbal Standards, which are not written down but are taken for granted and handed down from generation to generation. These can be applied differently depending on the case. There are also Written Standards, which are written down. These are hard to change, but much easier to apply than the Verbal Standards. In a Democratic State, the main set of rules is called the Constitution....   [tags: Law] 328 words
(0.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Constitution - The Constitution A case for the connection of America's colonial and revolutionary religious and political experiences to the basic principles of the Constitution can be readily made. One point in favor of this conclusion is the fact that most Americans at that time had little beside their experiences on which to base their political ideas. This is due to the lack of advanced schooling among common Americans at that time. Other points also concur with the main idea and make the theory of the connection plausible....   [tags: American America History] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Ratification of Constitution - The Constitution has been operative since 1789 after the ratification of nine states (American Vision and Values, Page 52). Today many question the relevancy of a document 222 years old to our society. The Founders created a governmental framework, defining three branches and giving powers to the government and others to the states. It also guarantees the rights of the people. It took two and one-half years for the 13 colonies to ratify the Constitution. This ratification period was one of great debate and produced a series of essays complied into The Federalist....   [tags: USA, the Founders] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution - CONSTITUTION ARTICLE I Name This organization shall be named the Hippocratic Society ARTICLE II Purpose The purpose of the Hippocratic Society, hereafter referred to as the Society, shall be to foster and broaden the intellectual perspectives of those with an interest in medicine; to facilitate this end, the club shall hold regular meetings, sponsor, when possible, academic and social pursuits such as guest speakers, attendances at state and national conventions of interest, and interaction with students at other colleges akin interests....   [tags: essays research papers] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution - The Constitution of the United States was made from scratch in 1787. Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, and James Monroe were some of the most prominent and popular of the founding fathers that helped make it. The Constitution has many elements of it that were a compromise between different factions with in the colonies. Most of the delegates tried to look past their own partial interests in order to create a strong national government for the people. James Madison the "father of the Constitution" drafted a proposed plan of national government....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
(2.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The British Constitution - Since the early beginning of social and political development; man sought resolutions to the on-going lawlessness/anarchy which plagued the social and early political life of man. The answer was simple in theory –to create a set universal codex of rules by which they would be governed by and which would promote order, replacing the lawless chaos which existed –concomitantly limiting the power of the rulers. There are many beliefs as to the origins of the Constitution, with some claiming that it was devised 2500 years ago in the city-states of Ancient Greece, others claim since Runnymede or even as early in the 17th-century English revolutions....   [tags: political development, parliament acts]
:: 2 Works Cited
1418 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Constitution - Forming a new nation with its own values and beliefs was a very daunting task. It was supremely difficult when the members of the nation were holding on to the beliefs of the old ruling country. It was believed that to be a leader you had to be in the upper classes, a so called aristocrat. To be an aristocrat you had to posses large sums of land and property. Property was not in the sense we think of today. Back then, slaves were also considered property. So the vast majority of our leaders owned slaves....   [tags: American History] 597 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The U.S. Constitution - A constitution is a written document that sets forth the fundamental rules by which a society is governed. Throughout the course of history the United States has lived under two Constitutions since the British-American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain in 1776. First in line was the Articles of Confederation (1789-1789) followed by the Constitution of United States of America (1789-present). The Articles of Confederation was the first formal written Constitution of America that specified how the national government was to operate....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1215 words
(3.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Australian Constitution - Formed in 1901, The Australian Constitution is a document consisting of a formal set of rules associated with informal conventions that cooperate with political institutions to establish governance of a polity. It is a unique mixture of the rather informal British Constitution with some components of the very formal United States of America’s Constitution. The Constitution is the fundamental law of Australia which is binds the Commonwealth Parliament and the Parliament of each state. The Constitution of Australia serves great importance to the Australian political system, by setting forth the manner in which our courts, parliaments and cabinets operate within the Australian policy....   [tags: history, legislation, politics]
:: 7 Works Cited
1657 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Ratifying the Constitution - At the Federal Convention in 1787, James Madison was prepared to propose a new form of government that would better represent the citizens of the United States, and he was further prepared to decry the Articles of Confederation due to their very nature of being too weak for the nation (Tindall & Shi, 2007). Although a few of the major political figures were unable to attend because they were on missions overseas, namely Adams and Jefferson, other invited delegates simply refused to attend, namely Patrick Henry....   [tags: Debates, State Sovereignty]
:: 3 Works Cited
533 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Arizona Constitution - The Arizona Constitution is one of the most important documents in the state of Arizona. The Arizona Constitution is the governing document of the state. It affects all the counties municipalities/corporations, and primary and secondary schools. This is a living document and was created for the people by the people. On February 14 1912 Arizona become a state, and the Arizona Constitution was born. The Arizona Constitution is made of 28 articles that give rights and laws to the citizens. The constitution gives instructions for how that state shall be ran....   [tags: Government]
:: 4 Works Cited
1015 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Australian Constitution - ... There have also being two major attempts made in federal parliament to introduce a Bill of Rights in the form of a non-constitutional statute. In 1973, Attorney-General Lionel Murphy introduced his proposal for a new statute. However, his Bill proved to be very controversial, lapsing in the Senate. Then in 1983, Attorney-General Gareth Evans introduced a similar Bill, but it too lapsed in the Senate. Although history suggests that Australia has operated well without a Human Rights charter, there are some strong reasons why Australia might need one....   [tags: bill of rights, founding fathers] 791 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Creating the Constitution - ... Furthermore, the engenderment of The Constitution caused much debate between the elite and democratic states because they cerebrated that if the Regime got all of the puissance, they would lose their rights. The conflict between the North and South played a major role in the development of this document. The North felt that representation in Congress should be predicated on the number of total people and South felt that it should be predicated on number of whites. However, The Three Fifths Compromise settled this when it was verbally expressed a slave will count as 3/5 of a free person of representatives and taxation....   [tags: founders, regime, democracy] 984 words
(2.8 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Creating the Constitution - The words spoken by man have the power to shape and ratify everything in its path. These following questions will do just that. Is not the strengthening of our federal government essential to the maintaining of a stable bureaucracy. Must we forego the strong fundamental structure that will ensure that every man will benefit immensely from a nation governed by those of the utmost intelligence and experience. We as a nation must procure a stance that will enforce and implement the necessary laws by any means possible....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
:: 17 Works Cited
2111 words
(6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Constitution's Ambiguity - The preamble of the Constitution lays out six reasons for its establishment of which two reasons standout, the establishment of justice and providing for the common defense. The national security of the United States was of paramount importance to our founders and remains so today after over 200 years. While there is no clear answer on how to achieve security, our constitutional system of government provides the framework for seeking its ends. The Constitution itself, in its ambiguity and deliberate requirement for interpretation, along with the elements of division of power and the rule of law, play key roles in how our government provides the blanket of security for our nation....   [tags: Separation of Power, Branches] 1142 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Arizona Constitution - Arizona Statehood and Constitution Arizona’s Constitution was written sometime in 1910; amended, ratified, and approved by Congress in 1911. Then Arizona became the 48th state and the last adjoining state to be welcomed in the Union; on February 14, 1912. Since then the citizens of Arizona has amended their Constitution many times. The Constitution consists of thirty articles. There were quite a lot of events that impacted the process of Arizona becoming its own state. The first section will examine the events that developed Arizona Constitution....   [tags: History, Government Branches, Amending]
:: 4 Works Cited
1739 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Arizona Constitution - Arizona Constitution Arizona gain statehood on February 14, 1912 as the forty-eighth state in the union. There were several events that led Arizona to statehood. President William Taft vetoed the first document for Arizona to become a state because he did not believe that citizens should use recall to remove judges from office (SU, 2008). This essay will give a detail timeline of the events leading up to Arizona becoming a state and the adoption of the Arizona Constitution. Also, included in this essay is a brief history of the events that influence Arizona Declaration of Rights....   [tags: State History]
:: 5 Works Cited
1213 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The US Constitution - The plan to divide the government into three branches was proposed by James Madison, at the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He modeled the division from who he referred to as ‘the Perfect Governor,’ as he read Isaiah 33:22; “For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord is our king; He will save us.” http://www.eadshome.com/QuotesoftheFounders.htm The founding fathers of the American Constitution divided the government up into the following three branches to prevent the majority from ruling with an iron fist; legislative, judicial, and executive....   [tags: US History] 1697 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Constitution of Medina - This paper contends the view that the so-called ‘Constitution of Medina’ has purported significance insofar as providing political prescription or provision for the creation of a Muslim state or government. This approach posits that a contextual understanding of the conditions underpinning the document’s creation, support the argument that the Qur’an omits overt provisions for any such form of government or state. This paper will first examine the context of the debate, whilst alluding to the nature of Mohammad’s prophetic mission in order to principally establish the inherent lack of overt political ambition and position of Mohammad, thus dismissing claims of overt political prescription be...   [tags: Muslim State, Quran, Political Prescription ]
:: 14 Works Cited
1813 words
(5.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Confederation and Constitution - The Constitution of 1787of the United States of America is signed by 38 of 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Supporters of the document paid a hard won battle to win ratification by the necessary nine out of thirteen U.S. states. The Articles of Confederation, ratified just before the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781. Congress the central authority had the control to govern foreign concerns, conduct war, and control currency. These powers were suddenly limited because Congress was given no authority to enforce its requests to the states for money or troops....   [tags: U.S. History ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1540 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The US Constitution - The US Constitution states “We The People of the United states in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, ensure domestic Tranquility, provide for more common defense, promote the General Welfare, and secure the blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” The main purpose of the U.S Constitution is to establish the basic rights of all American Citizens. This follows that every United States Citizens have equal rights....   [tags: American History, Democracy, Equal Rights] 1435 words
(4.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Drafting the Constitution - By the late eighteenth century, America found itself independent from England; which was a welcomed change, but also brought with it, its own set of challenges. The newly formed National Government was acting under the Articles of Confederation, which established a “firm league of friendship” between the states, but did not give adequate power to run the country. To ensure the young nation could continue independently, Congress called for a Federal Convention to convene in Philadelphia to address the deficiencies in the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: American History] 2555 words
(7.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment of the Constitution - Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment Over the centuries, the Supreme Court has always ruled that the 2nd Amendment protects the states' militia's rights to bear arms, and that this protection does not extend to individuals. In fact, legal scholars consider the issue "settled law." For this reason, the gun lobby does not fight for its perceived constitutional right to keep and bear arms before the Supreme Court, but in Congress. Interestingly, even interpreting an individual right in the 2nd Amendment presents the gun lobby with some thorny problems, like the right to keep and bear nuclear weapons....   [tags: Constituton Bill Rights Right To Bear Arms] 1611 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Written and Unwritten Components of the Constitution - A constitution is a thing antecedent to a government, and a government is only the creature of a constitution. A constitution is not the act of government, but of people constituting a government, and government without a constitution is power without a right. (1) Thomas Paine A constitution is the system of laws, customs and conventions which define the composition and power of organs of the state, and regulate the relations of the various state organs to one another and to the private citizen....   [tags: Politics, Laws, Rules of Government] 1006 words
(2.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Judiciary in Ireland: Interpreter of the Constitution - The Judiciary’s foremost role is to defend and uphold the constitution and to assure rule of law prevails in a country. In some ways it is the watchdog for the rights and liberties of the citizens. The Judiciary acts as a guardian of the constitution, arbitrates between the people and the legislature. Having said that has the Judiciary become puissant. Should we cap the amount of power it posses at present. I will discuss the question at hand by discussing the role of judiciary, the importance of the constitution and the conflict between constitutionalism and democracy....   [tags: politics, watchdog, power]
:: 9 Works Cited
1303 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Changes in the Texas Constitution of 1876 - The American way of living and thinking in Texas have changed tremendously over the past century. Political ideals are one thing that changes with time, and have transformed with the changing times well. The Texas constitution of 1876 was a landmark for the state and has been part of the state’s history since then. The Texas constitution of 1876 is still in use today but with all its harsh restrictions it is considered one of the most confusing of all the state constitutions. The constitution became one of the most prominent changes to Texas education system and politics....   [tags: education, politics, government] 569 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Importance of Constitution to Our Democracy - ... On the opposite side, others insists that the constitution is absolutely useless since it is widely adopted in the numerous autocratic states, and used to retain the power and authority in hands of current government. Basically, those debates reflects the controversial nature of statecraft. My paperwork is intended to consider the role of the constitution and constitutional court in democratic society. As R. Dahrendolf mentioned, constitutional democracy can be achieved in three stages: 1. The drafting and implementation of a new constitution that sets up the core values of statehood, fundamental rights, the main models of the rule of law, independent and unbiased carrying out of justic...   [tags: majority, power, economy] 531 words
(1.5 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Ratification of the Constitution and the Louisiana Purchase - Two issues during the early republic were the ratification of the Constitution and the purchase of the Louisiana Territory. The Constitution of the United States was written in 1787, yet there was a struggle for its ratification that went on until 1790. The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition by the United States of America in 1803. Some historical circumstances surrounding the issue of the ratification of the Constitution was weakness of the new government under the Articles of Confederation which led to the Constitutional Convention....   [tags: American history, early republic] 551 words
(1.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Articles of Confederation and The Constitution - ... Under the Articles of Confederation, the National Government did not have the power to tax citizens for military reasons, draft citizens for the military, or create a common monetary system. These were just few of many things that gave fault to the Articles of Confederation. For the time being, this did not seem like a big deal for the citizens of the new country. The Founding Fathers, though, knew something would have to eventually change for the United States to succeed in the future. The process of drafting the Constitution started on May 25th of 1787....   [tags: founding fathers, states, power, rights] 648 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
An Adaptable Constitution and Human Rights - Unitarily speaking, the political discourse that is associated with the United States Constitution is unsettling. The line drawn amongst what can be considered a right seems to fluctuate between obscurity and clarity. Although the fluctuation comes at a period of convenience, it is at whose expense that fluctuation comes, ought to be question. The United States Constitution and the term “rights” are politically, socially, and permanently engaged. Out of the political discourse of assessing what constitute as a right, is the question of how outdated is the United States Constitution as it pertains to present day America....   [tags: Political Discourse] 1628 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The 14th Ammendment to the US Constitution - ... We don't see it being dealt with by the government until 1791, when an amendment is made. The right to bear arms comes from the second amendment of the constitution, which reads: "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." (U.S consititution). Almost two centuries later, the Gun Control Act of 1968 was set in motion. This act "...was enacted for the purpose of keeping firearms out of the hands of those not legally entitled to possess them because of age, criminal background, or incompetence." (Longley) Throughout the years, more and more public acts pertaining to guns occured causing...   [tags: American Government ] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Ratifying the Constitution to the Bill of Rights - ... Constitution. In the end, the Articles of Confederation led to Shay’s Rebellion and the needing of a Bill of Rights in our new Constitution. Federalists such as Thomas R. Frazier and George Washington supported the constitution because they believed that while under the Articles of Confederation people were melancholy, trade was inadequate, and Europe looked down on them. (1) They saw the complaints of the Anti-federalists and the complaints of other federalists and what the articles were doing to them....   [tags: power, government, separation] 616 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Ratification of the United States Constitution - During 1787 and 1788 there were quite a few debates over the ratification of the United States Constitution. The issues disputed are outlined and explored in the Federalist Papers, an assortment of letters and essays, often published under pseudonyms, which emerged in a variety of publications after the Constitution was presented to the public. Those who supported the Constitution were Federalists, and those who opposed were Anti-Federalists. Their deliberations concerned several main issues. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison, and other supporters of the Constitution argued in support of the federalist requirements that reserved powers to the states as well as the nationalist el...   [tags: anti-federalists, federalist paper] 961 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States was written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, where it was held in Philadelphia. It was written by a group of people known as “Farmers,” or the “Founding Fathers,” and few of the most famous Founding Fathers were George Washington (The first president of the USA), Thomas Jefferson (The first vice president and the third president of the USA) James Madison (The fourth president of the USA), Samuel Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. The old government, the Articles of Confederation was not working as it supposed to be, it was vulnerable and cannot secure and defend the new born nation and for that reason the constitution of the united states saw the lig...   [tags: US Government] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Articles of Confederation verses the Constitution - The Articles of Confederation on November 15, 1777 were accepted by Congress, but not ratified by all the states until March 1, 1781, Maryland was the last state to ratify. The Articles were a humble attempt to form a national government by a new country trying to unite itself. The Articles of Confederation, however, wanted the states to have the majority of the power. The Articles government was very weak, but this was done on purpose, because after finally gaining independence from Britain, they feared that a strong central government would lead to an empowerment of another monarchy....   [tags: american history, federalists] 1117 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
James Madison: The Father of The Constitution - ... Madison introduced the first amendments (additions) to the Constitution, which are now known as the Bill of Rights. One of Madison’s most influential essays written regarding separation of religion and government gave him the inspiration for some of the Bill of Rights. Madison originally drafted 19 amendments, 12 of which his congressional colleagues passed on to the states for their approval. In 1791, 10 of those originally drafted amendments been ratified by enough states to become part of the U.S....   [tags: american history, articles of confederations] 715 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Articles of Confederation and the US Constitution - After the Revolutionary War, the newly formed United States still had a major task ahead of them. They had to form a new government that would satisfy the demands of the people and ensure the success of their nation. The Articles of Confederation was the first system of government that was proposed and put into effect. This attempt at creating a system that protected the people form a strong central government ultimately failed but was an important step in the development of the current government system....   [tags: revolutionary war, failure of the articles]
:: 5 Works Cited
1052 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
History and Purpose of the US Constitution - ... In addition, the Constitution also creates obligations among the states. These obligations, written in Article IV, were intended to unite states. By obligating states to recognize actions and decision taken in other states as legal and proper. In Article IV, Section 1 calls for ‘Full Faith and Credit” among states, which means that other states must respect ‘public acts”, Records and judicial proceedings” that take place in other states (Lowi, 2007, pg. 52). It also guarantees citizens of any state the privileges and immunities of every other state....   [tags: Founding Fathers, democracy, government] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The U.S. Constitution: Checks & Balances - The U.S. Constitution is the foundation of American governance. Since its creation in 1878, the Constitution remains as the foundation of governance for the Republic and stands as the oldest living Constitution in the world. To prevent a tyranny of the majority will – or of one part of governance – it became necessary to ensure the several branches of government remained separate. To ensure that one of these branches did not trump the other branches, the Founders crafted – within the Constitution – a set of checks and balances....   [tags: US Government]
:: 3 Works Cited
1277 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Development of the American Constitution - The Articles of Confederation were approved by all the early American states in 1781, but by 1787, it was apparent that the Articles were insufficient for the young nation to operate on. A convention was formed with the priority job being to revise the Articles of Confederation; however, they only concluded that an entire new structure was needed to fulfill the demands of the growing country. The Constitution was then born. The Constitution provided the structure of government and power that was needed to achieve a strong union....   [tags: government, American history, 1787, ] 518 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Articles of Confederation and The Constitution - In the history of the United States of America, our government has been defined by two very important documents. Reflecting on all governments of the past, they laid forth an impressive jumble of ideas that would lead the way to where we are today. These two documents are the Article of Confederation and the U.S Constitution. These two documents of precedent are both similar and unique, each with its own pros and cons, and neither being perfect. Both these documents addressed the prominent vital in national vs....   [tags: US History, Government] 1248 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States - If someone asked you what document most significantly affected America, what would your response be. In early 1787, Daniel Shay led a rebellion in Massachusetts in which the response time to put it down caused a meeting for the complete re-evaluation of the efficiency of the Articles of Confederation. The final result of that meeting was not an amendment of the Articles, but an entirely new draft called the Constitution of the United States. Since then, this document has not only been referred to as the “supreme law”, but as the cornerstone and foundation of the United States government....   [tags: Significance, Amendments, Sections] 859 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The History of the United States Constitution - After the American Revolution, the United States was strained and in need of a new form of government. Representatives of the colonies decided that there was a need to have a written document that held true to what the union of America stood for. They began with the Articles of Confederation. When the Articles failed to properly organize the country, a new approach was needed. After long nights and many debates the forefather's agreed upon drafting a new Constitution that would hold strong for future generations....   [tags: bill of rights, confederation, american revolution]
:: 6 Works Cited
1425 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States of America is one of the most famous documents in history. It did not just serve as an outline of our nations government for our founding fathers, but also for their grandchildren, and their grandchildren’s grandchildren, and so forth. However no one is perfect and today American Politicians fight over the true meaning of the Constitution; although they still believe in the wisdom it entrusts, it is hard for some to oversee political barriers and examine the true meaning of their position such as The Constitution presents....   [tags: Beneficial Influence on the Country]
:: 2 Works Cited
923 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The American Constitution and Drug War - The consensus with regards to drug laws favors more stringent and draconian laws, with the attempt to stifle use and punish crime. There are many claims used against drug legalization, such as, moral degradation, crime, the destruction of inner cities; along with families, diseases, such as AIDS, and the corrupting of law enforcement. When one examines the effects of prohibition, one has to inquire: has the cost been worth it. Certainly, an argument for the abolition of prohibition doesn’t include the favoring of drug use, but merely recognizes the vain and utopian attempt to control individual choices....   [tags: American Government, Law, drugs, criminal justice] 2065 words
(5.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The U.S. Constitution and The Patriot Act - George Washington once said, “The Constitution is the guide which I never will abandon.” The first President of the United States knew that the Constitution was and still is the greatest and most important document in America. He said that he would never abandon it and he would never deny it. He would follow it, like it was a guide. The Constitution is supposed to be a guide, which would never be neglected. However, the current government has deserted and almost discarded the United States Constitution....   [tags: Government]
:: 6 Works Cited
1951 words
(5.6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Articles of Confederation Remedied by The Constitution - The year of 1776 was a time of revolution, independence, and patriotism. American colonists had severed their umbilical cord to the Mother Country and declared themselves “Free and Independent States”.1 The chains of monarchy had been thrown off and a new government was formed. Shying away from a totalitarian government, the Second Continental Congress drafted a document called the Articles of Confederation which established a loose union of the states. It was an attempt at self-government that ended in failure....   [tags: Government]
:: 1 Works Cited
1723 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Chapter 9 of the Constitution: Bankrupcy - ... This clause, however, solely limits a state’s ability to create a bankruptcy system. The Constitution explicitly grants Congress the power to create laws governing bankruptcy. Under the terms of Article I, Section 8, Clause 4 of the US Constitution, Congress is granted the power, among other things, “(t)o establish a uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States; . . . .” Under the powers of Section 8, Congress created the current bankruptcy chapters, including Chapter 9 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code....   [tags: encouraging development of a commercial republic] 1373 words
(3.9 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
How The Constitution Endangered Freedom - How The Constitution Endangered Freedom The US constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787 and brought together, in one remarkable document, ideas from many people and several existing documents, including the Articles of Confederation and Declaration of Independence. Those who made significant intellectual contributions to the constitution are called the founding fathers (Jordan, 2012). This essay will discuss why some of the founding fathers thought that the constitution would endanger freedom, the response they received from those who supported the constitution and how they thought the constitution would improve freedom....   [tags: religion, liberties, protection, powers]
:: 3 Works Cited
531 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Constitution"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>