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The Creation Of The Constitution - In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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An Essay on the Constitution - After gaining independence, Americans created a unique government. Purposefully diverging from the seams of a monarchial government, Americans created a new one from the ideas of republicanism. Under the Articles of Confederation, the power was given to the states as opposed to a centralized government. However, this made it difficult to raise revenue. Without the power to tax, congress could not pay back debts. Also, needing nine out thirteen votes from the states to pass a law made it almost nearly impossible to get anything done....   [tags: American Constitution] 1036 words
(3 pages)
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The U.S. Constitution and Slavery - The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didn’t abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself “ all men are created equal” but he owned slaves. The founding father didn’t look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution....   [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ] 408 words
(1.2 pages)
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The American Constitution - The American Constitution The basis of all law in the United States is the Constitution. This Constitution is a document written by "outcasts" of England. The Constitution of the United States sets forth the nation's fundamental laws. It establishes the form of the national government and defines the rights and liberties of the American people. It also lists the aims of the government and the methods of achieving them. The Constitution was written to organize a strong national government for the American states....   [tags: United States Constitution] 2881 words
(8.2 pages)
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The Organization of the Constitution vs. the Articles of Confederation - The Constitution is a very well organized and well thought out document that holds strong bases for the future of America, unlike the Articles of Confederation. The constitution is ultimately more detailed and intricate, giving a less questionable guideline to any future problems which may come to rise. For example, the Articles of Confederation gives us Congress, unicameral. The Constitution gives us Congress, and divides it into the Senate and the House of Representatives, becoming bicameral and more balanced in power....   [tags: Constitution, USA, congress, Articles of Confedera] 469 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Progression From The Articles of Confederation to The Constitution As a Result of Anti-Federalist, and Federalist Debate - Looking back in history (1781-1787) at the debate over ratification of the Constitution we can see that the making of the constitution was a long drawn out battle between the federalists and the Anti-Federalists. There were concerns as to the inherent weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, such as the lack of action during Shay’s Rebellion, the issue over taxation, as well as the problematic consensus required by all states to change any one of the Articles. There was a fear that if given too much power the executive leader would become like the king they had just fought a revolution to free themselves from....   [tags: American Constitution]
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3731 words
(10.7 pages)
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How Presidents of the United States Overstep their Bounds and Defy the Constitution - Wesley Clark, a former United States Army General and a decorated Vietnam War veteran, states in his book Winning Modern Wars that “Defeating terrorism is more difficult and far-reaching than we have assumed....We may be advancing the ball down the field at will, running over our opponent's defenses, but winning the game is another matter altogether.” He also stated in the preface of the book “that the Bush administration had rushed us, pushed us, mislead, and manipulated us into war with Iraq with at the expense of the real war against Al- Qaeda.” Clark in writing stating this is essentially telling us we (The United States) have somehow overstepped our boundaries by acting in this “War on Terror,” and while he might have made a gutsy statement, he is correct....   [tags: Politics, Constitution]
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1653 words
(4.7 pages)
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Effectiveness of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America - In this essay I will be writing about the effectiveness of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America and considering whether they achieved the purpose of making life better for African Americans. I’m going to start this essay by talking about the Amendments and what they were designed to achieve. In total there are 27 amendments to the Constitution, all with different ways to make America better. Around 1791 the first amendments were made but the amendments I will be looking at occurred later....   [tags: US Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States            The Preamble states the broad purposes the Constitution is intended to serve - to establish a government that provides for greater cooperation among the States, ensures justice and peace, provides for defense against foreign enemies, promotes the general well-being of the people, and secures liberty now and in the future.      Article I of the Constitution is based on the legislative department. Section 1. Legislative Power; the Congress: is the nations lawmaking body....   [tags: Constitution Summary Essays] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Constitution - The preamble introduces the constitution. It states that the government comes from the people. Its general purposes are in order to form a more perfect union we have to “Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.” (Remy, United States Government, McGraw Hill companies, Ohio, 2002) Its purpose is to make a good government and good laws, have peace in our homes, national security, healthy communities, and freedom to ourselves, families and friends....   [tags: Political Science]
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1031 words
(2.9 pages)
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America's Accountability to its Constitution and the Events at Abu Ghraib - Our constitution is built upon the ideas of freedom and decency. After all, it was written after hundreds of years worth of tyranny both at home in England (at the time), and abroad. People were standing against oppression leveled against them from thousands of miles away (for example, the Boston Tea Party), and they were called traitors to the Crown. Today, if someone speaks out against the US and its oppression, or chooses to fight back, we call him an insurgent or a terrorist. It’s quite a twist....   [tags: constitution, USA, government, Abu Ghraib, ]
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771 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States The United States Constitution is the law of the United States. It is the foundation of this country and the most important document in its history. It provides the guidelines for the government and citizens of the United States. The Constitution will unquestionably continue to carry us into the 22nd century, just as it has for over two hundred years. The principles of the Constitution remain strong to this day, especially with respect to our government and to the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Law Land US History Constitution Government] 1412 words
(4 pages)
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The Second Amendment of the Constitution - The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” This timeless phrase, the Second Amendment of the United States’ Constitution, is an enduring example of the principles and ideals that our country was founded on. With this statement, the founders of this country explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 503 words
(1.4 pages)
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Impact of the Gulf War, September 11th, and the War in Iraq on the U.S. Constitution - The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was completed on September, 1787, with its adoption by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was later ratified by special conventions in each of the original thirteen states. It created a more unified and defined government in place of what was then a group of free and independent states operating under the Articles of Confederation. During its history there have been a numerous number of events which have occurred which have seriously tested this Constitution After conflicts in South Korea, the two World Wars and Vietname the next conflict to have tested the Constitution was the first Gulf War in 1991....   [tags: American Constitution] 1082 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Constitution - Every society has certain standards which ensure that its members' actions do not harm the same society. There are two types of standards, Verbal Standards, which are not written down but are taken for granted and handed down from generation to generation. These can be applied differently depending on the case. There are also Written Standards, which are written down. These are hard to change, but much easier to apply than the Verbal Standards. In a Democratic State, the main set of rules is called the Constitution....   [tags: Law] 328 words
(0.9 pages)
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The Constitution - The Constitution A case for the connection of America's colonial and revolutionary religious and political experiences to the basic principles of the Constitution can be readily made. One point in favor of this conclusion is the fact that most Americans at that time had little beside their experiences on which to base their political ideas. This is due to the lack of advanced schooling among common Americans at that time. Other points also concur with the main idea and make the theory of the connection plausible....   [tags: American America History] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
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constitution - The Constitution itself did not mention political parties, and it was assumed that none was going to arise. But this was soon proven wrong when the debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in 1787 and 1788 stir into a two party system. This soon led to a permanent feature in American policies. In early times, groups of people formed temporary assembly and voted together either for or against a specific policy. When the policy was settled, the assemblies would dissolve. The Federalists and Anti-Federalist was sort of like these assemblies, but they didn’t dissolve that easily....   [tags: essays research papers] 386 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Constitution - CONSTITUTION ARTICLE I Name This organization shall be named the Hippocratic Society ARTICLE II Purpose The purpose of the Hippocratic Society, hereafter referred to as the Society, shall be to foster and broaden the intellectual perspectives of those with an interest in medicine; to facilitate this end, the club shall hold regular meetings, sponsor, when possible, academic and social pursuits such as guest speakers, attendances at state and national conventions of interest, and interaction with students at other colleges akin interests....   [tags: essays research papers] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Constitution - The Constitution of the United States was made from scratch in 1787. Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, and James Monroe were some of the most prominent and popular of the founding fathers that helped make it. The Constitution has many elements of it that were a compromise between different factions with in the colonies. Most of the delegates tried to look past their own partial interests in order to create a strong national government for the people. James Madison the "father of the Constitution" drafted a proposed plan of national government....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Constitution - Forming a new nation with its own values and beliefs was a very daunting task. It was supremely difficult when the members of the nation were holding on to the beliefs of the old ruling country. It was believed that to be a leader you had to be in the upper classes, a so called aristocrat. To be an aristocrat you had to posses large sums of land and property. Property was not in the sense we think of today. Back then, slaves were also considered property. So the vast majority of our leaders owned slaves....   [tags: American History] 597 words
(1.7 pages)
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Ratification of Constitution - ... This does not provide for a modern interpretation which changes with the times. The “Living” Constitution is an opposing philosophy in which the Constitution is an evolving document which is flexible to the needs and values of society as it evolves. I agree with the philosophy of originalism and the belief that the Constitution is “fundamentally a rulebook for government” (Moore, Page 175). The Constitution gives specific power to the federal government in Section 8. Many would call this list of powers limited, but the Framers’ intention is clear to limit the federal government and allow the states to more closely govern the people – through the consent of the people....   [tags: USA, the Founders] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
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Constitution Timeline - States operate from various powers, policies, and laws created within each state’s government, but the entire United States of America operates under a fundamental law. This law is the only law known to be the highest law of the land and it is the United States Constitution. The Constitution has proposed such remarkable power from documents and events that it holds such significance not only in the United States of America, but also other countries. The purpose of this paper is to create a chronological narrative delineating the significance of documents and events that has place an impact on the U.S....   [tags: U.S. History]
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1154 words
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The U.S. Constitution - A constitution is a written document that sets forth the fundamental rules by which a society is governed. Throughout the course of history the United States has lived under two Constitutions since the British-American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain in 1776. First in line was the Articles of Confederation (1789-1789) followed by the Constitution of United States of America (1789-present). The Articles of Confederation was the first formal written Constitution of America that specified how the national government was to operate....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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1215 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Arizona Constitution - The Arizona Constitution is one of the most important documents in the state of Arizona. The Arizona Constitution is the governing document of the state. It affects all the counties municipalities/corporations, and primary and secondary schools. This is a living document and was created for the people by the people. On February 14 1912 Arizona become a state, and the Arizona Constitution was born. The Arizona Constitution is made of 28 articles that give rights and laws to the citizens. The constitution gives instructions for how that state shall be ran....   [tags: Government]
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1015 words
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Provisions of the Constitution - "A noble five-point buck, he occupies a third of the width and height of the pictorial design, in the geographical centre of the forefront. Standing erect, head thrown far back, facing east, but with one eye on the audience, his forefeet stand firmly on the motto (Bennett, 2011)." This is what the state seal featured 1863. The final state seal is a testament of the ever changing face of Arizona as a prospector with fields adorns the back. The strong and proud heritage is seen in the constitution itself....   [tags: Government]
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1590 words
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The Arizona Constitution - Running head: ARIZONA CONSTITUTION Arizona Constitution Arizona Constitution Arizona gain statehood on February 14, 1912 as the forty-eighth state in the union. There were several events that led Arizona to statehood. President William Taft vetoed the first document for Arizona to become a state because he did not believe that citizens should use recall to remove judges from office (GCU, 2008). This essay will give a detail timeline of the events leading up to Arizona becoming a state and the adoption of the Arizona Constitution....   [tags: State History]
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1213 words
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Creating the Constitution - The words spoken by man have the power to shape and ratify everything in its path. These following questions will do just that. Is not the strengthening of our federal government essential to the maintaining of a stable bureaucracy. Must we forego the strong fundamental structure that will ensure that every man will benefit immensely from a nation governed by those of the utmost intelligence and experience. We as a nation must procure a stance that will enforce and implement the necessary laws by any means possible....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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2111 words
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The US Constitution - The plan to divide the government into three branches was proposed by James Madison, at the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He modeled the division from who he referred to as ‘the Perfect Governor,’ as he read Isaiah 33:22; “For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord is our king; He will save us.” http://www.eadshome.com/QuotesoftheFounders.htm The founding fathers of the American Constitution divided the government up into the following three branches to prevent the majority from ruling with an iron fist; legislative, judicial, and executive....   [tags: US History] 1697 words
(4.8 pages)
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Confederation and Constitution - The Constitution of 1787of the United States of America is signed by 38 of 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Supporters of the document paid a hard won battle to win ratification by the necessary nine out of thirteen U.S. states. The Articles of Confederation, ratified just before the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781. Congress the central authority had the control to govern foreign concerns, conduct war, and control currency. These powers were suddenly limited because Congress was given no authority to enforce its requests to the states for money or troops....   [tags: U.S. History ]
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1540 words
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The US Constitution - The US Constitution states “We The People of the United states in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, ensure domestic Tranquility, provide for more common defense, promote the General Welfare, and secure the blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” The main purpose of the U.S Constitution is to establish the basic rights of all American Citizens. This follows that every United States Citizens have equal rights....   [tags: American History, Democracy, Equal Rights] 1435 words
(4.1 pages)
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Amendments to the Constitution - The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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Drafting the Constitution - By the late eighteenth century, America found itself independent from England; which was a welcomed change, but also brought with it, its own set of challenges. The newly formed National Government was acting under the Articles of Confederation, which established a “firm league of friendship” between the states, but did not give adequate power to run the country. To ensure the young nation could continue independently, Congress called for a Federal Convention to convene in Philadelphia to address the deficiencies in the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: American History] 2555 words
(7.3 pages)
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Comparing the United States Constitution with Local State Constitutions - The United States Constitution begins with the simple phrase “We the People”. Yet, with three simple words, the ideology it stands for has shaped the entire country (O’Connor et al., 2011). The short phrase signifies that the document, and thus, the government, is based upon the people themselves. The Constitution reflects the culture and ideologies of its citizens. Similarly, state constitutions reflect the people, albeit in a more specific locality. The key differences between the United States Constitution and that of local states are due to the distinctions between the scope and characteristics of the people they govern....   [tags: Government]
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855 words
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Constitutional Changes Made for the Better - The contentious debate over the replacement of the U.S. Constitution has brought both joy and conflict to America abroad. Many ideals and beliefs that were unable to be settled upon by the noble drafters hundreds of years ago shall be brought back into discussion. As it is obvious that many changes have shaped America to be very different than it was in 1789, many of the principles of democracy in this great article have held up regardless. I believe that our Constitution has more than proved itself to be competent in regards to governing its people, with over 200 years without change....   [tags: U.S. Constitution]
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1026 words
(2.9 pages)
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Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment of the Constitution - Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment Over the centuries, the Supreme Court has always ruled that the 2nd Amendment protects the states' militia's rights to bear arms, and that this protection does not extend to individuals. In fact, legal scholars consider the issue "settled law." For this reason, the gun lobby does not fight for its perceived constitutional right to keep and bear arms before the Supreme Court, but in Congress. Interestingly, even interpreting an individual right in the 2nd Amendment presents the gun lobby with some thorny problems, like the right to keep and bear nuclear weapons....   [tags: Constituton Bill Rights Right To Bear Arms] 1611 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Constitution of the U.K. - The Constitution of the U.K. There are two meanings to the word constitution the first is that It will contain all of the rules for the organisation of the state.and secondly It will usuall be ‘entrenced’ which means that it is hard to change. The constitution of a country is a set of rules regulating the powers of its government and the rights and duties of its citizens. In all but a few democracies in the world, the nation's constitution can be found in a single document. The exceptions are Israel, New Zealand and the United Kingdom....   [tags: Papers] 1232 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Constitution of a State - The Constitution of a State A constitution is a set of rules and principles on how a country is governed. Competition for political power in most countries is fierce, so rules are needed to control the competition for power to ensure it takes place within satisfactory limits. Professor KC Wheare defines the constitution of a state as: …the whole system of a government of a country, the collection of rules, which establish and regulate or govern the government. (Barnett, P7) An older definition, that of Thomas Paine, reveals a more complex set of ideas: A constitution is not the act of a government, but of a people constituting a government, and a government without a constitution is a power without right…A constitution is a thing antecedent to a government; and a government is the only creature of a constitution....   [tags: Papers] 1688 words
(4.8 pages)
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Constitution Comparison - Constitution Comparison By AntiYuke I compared the U.S.A. constitution and the Australian constitution. Their differences are as abundant as their similarities. The Australian constitution is extremely long and drawn out, where as the United States constitution sticks right to the point. All in all, the two constitutions have the same goal in that they wish to bestow the same basic rights to each person. The two constitutions both have a preamble, however the Australian constitution is many more times greater in length....   [tags: essays research papers] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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The British Constitution - The British Constitution A constitution is a set of laws on how a country is governed. The British Constitution is unwritten, unlike the constitution in America, and, as such, is referred to as an uncodified constitution. The British Constitution can be found in a variety of documents. Supporters of our constitution believe that the current way allows for flexibility and change to occur without too many problems. Those who want a written constitution believe that it should be codified so that the public as a whole has access to it – as opposed to just constitutional experts who know where to look and how to interpret it....   [tags: Papers] 491 words
(1.4 pages)
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The Constitution "Understood" - The Jeffersonian-Republicans are characterized by their strict interpretation of the constitution, in stark contrast with the Federalists loose or broad interpretation. The Federalists believed that anything the constitution did not forbid it permitted, contrary to the Jeffersonian view that anything it did not permit it forbade. The Federalists advocated the “necessary” and “proper” clause, and their faith rested heavily in the virtue of implied powers. The Jeffersonian party believed that all powers not specifically granted to the central government were reserved to the states, disregarding the implication of inferred powers....   [tags: essays research papers] 678 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Ratification of the Constitution - The Ratification of the Constitution      In 1787, the Constitution was created to replace the Articles of Confederation, because it was felt that the Articles weren’t sufficient for running the country. However, the Constitution was not very well liked by everyone .      The constitution created was very much liked by the majority of the country. This included the farmers, the merchants, the mechanics, and other of the common people. However, there were those who were very important people in the revolution who felt that the Constitution would not work, most notably Patrick Henry and Thomas Paine, who felt they were the backbone of the revolution....   [tags: American History] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
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Factions and the Constitution - Factions and the Constitution The framers designed the Constitution in such a way as to lessen the influence of political parties in American government, however at the same time, the very essence to the formation of political parties, liberty, was left in the Constitution. Both Madison and Schattschneider cite that while the Constitution does not support factions, it cannot abolish them because of the fact that the Constitution was designed to protect the liberties of the citizens. They both go on to say that liberty is the spark, which causes political parties to develop....   [tags: Papers] 419 words
(1.2 pages)
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Prostituting the Constitution - Prostituting the Constitution It has become fashionable to propose amendments to the constitution for all imaginable causes. Thus the nation's charter is endangered by a barrage of new and unworthy ideas offered up by opportunistic politicians seeking to exploit popular passions. Indeed, constitutional reform seems to be the hot topic around Washington and in the writings of both liberal and conservative journalists across the country. No longer is it suitable for legislation to follow the normal means of entering into law - ratification by both House and Senate, pending the signature of the President....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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U.S. Constitution - The document I chose to write about is the United States Constitution. When the thirteen British colonies in North America declared their independence in 1776, they laid down that “governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” The “colonies” had to establish a government, which would be the framework for the United States. The purpose of a written constitution is to define and therefore more specifically limit government powers. After the Articles of Confederation failed to work in the 13 colonies, the U.S....   [tags: essays research papers] 430 words
(1.2 pages)
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Powers of the Constitution - Powers of the Constitution The national and state governments derive their respective powers from the Constitution in several ways. Some powers are explicitly stated while others are not. Understanding the various types of powers can be difficult and this essay is an attempt to clarify them. The Tenth Amendment of the Constitution states, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people." From this amendment we first learn of delegated and reserved powers....   [tags: Papers] 547 words
(1.6 pages)
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Federal Constitution - The simple turn of a century from the late 1700's to the 1800's brought about drastic change in regard to the United States government. Not only had the rebellious colonies overthrown the oppressive rule of their mother country Britain, but they had already begun to establish their own political domain. Within this realm of the newly founded democracy were two conflicting parties. On one side was the Jeffersonian Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson himself and later on by James Madison. Those who composed this legislative faction tended to believe in strong state governments, a feeble central government, and a rigid interpretation of the constitution....   [tags: Political Science] 1190 words
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Inequality and Constitution - Liberty, as defined by the Oxford dictionary, is explained as the “condition of being free from restriction or control; the right and power to act, believe or express oneself in a manner of one’s own choosing”. Liberty is a word familiar to most Americans, since the fundamentals of the country is based on freedom and independence. Symbolism of liberty (such as the national’s flag, statue of liberty, the liberty bell, Uncle Sam, the bald eagle) can be seen throughout the United States as a reminder of the freedom in which this nation has achieved for over the past two hundred years....   [tags: essays research papers] 2607 words
(7.4 pages)
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The Us Constitution - In February of 1787, the Continental Congress met in Philadelphia to revise or replace the Articles of Confederation. This revision was necessary to fix the problems the newly independent states were having. Fifty five delegates attended the convention such as James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Roger Sherman. These delegates included the two schools of jurisdiction, compact and contract, into the Constitution to help make it one of the most important documents ever written. A compact school of jurisprudence is a tightly bound set of laws by which a society lives by....   [tags: American History] 332 words
(0.9 pages)
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A Written Constitution - A Written Constitution A written constitution is a formal document that defines the nature of constitutional agreements; theses include rules that govern the political system and the rights of citizens and governments in a codified form. The UK's constitution is unwritten as it hails from no single written document, but derives from a number of sources that can be said to be written and part unwritten, examples of this include conventions, works of authority, Acts of Parliament, EU law and common law....   [tags: Papers] 786 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Weimar Constitution - The Weimar Constitution In January 1919 Hugo Preuss, whom was a left wing liberal set out to make a constitution, which was drawn up and submitted to the national assembly in Weimar. Historian William Carr says, “Preuss set out to combine democracy and parliamentary government with a high degree of centralisation for the left wing” which meant he was trying to give power to the left. Following extensive debates the constitution was eventually declared on 11 August 1919. This constitution contained 181 articles which was divided up into different groups called ‘ Rights and Duties of the German people’ and also ‘Structures and Functions of the Reich....   [tags: Papers] 1253 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Godless Constitution - The Godless Constitution When some people here the words “the godless constitution” uttered the shrill up their noses and get very defensive. Kramnick and Moore address this idea of the United States Constitution being godless. They speak about how America has misinterpreted views and how society would benefit from an understanding of what the Constitution stands for and how to correctly use it. They strive to help America understand that politics driven by religion and faith would do the most damage to the political agenda....   [tags: essays research papers] 996 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Australian Constitution - The Australian Constitution Will Australia become a republic in the next twenty years. This is a difficult question to speculate on. The main area of law governing this issue is section 128 of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (U.K). Other issues in this debate are regarding appointment, termination and the powers to be awarded to the proposed Head of State, and the impact the change will have on the States. Examining the history of Australian Legislative powers, and reasons why Australians would want to change, is also useful when speculating on this issue....   [tags: Papers] 1043 words
(3 pages)
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The British Constitution - The British Constitution The constitution of Britain has traditionally been split between royal prerogative statutes, common law, convention, convention and authoritative opinion. But recent external developments such as the European Union (EU) and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) have had a strong influence on Britain. The Royal Prerogative are a set of privileges that the Royal family since the Middle Ages. However, as the power of the monarchy declined, the power was now with the Prime minister and his cabinet....   [tags: Free Essays] 380 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Threat of the Constitution - The Threat of the Constitution The fundamental point of contention between the Federalists and anti-Federalists in their debates over ratification of the Constitution surrounded the question of what powers were necessary in order to insure the security of the nation as a whole. The federalists, of course, believed that a strong central government was necessary, for reasons of national security and economic prosperity. The anti-Federalists were strongly opposed to the centralization of power, rather, they were concerned with retaining the sovereignty of the states and, in turn, their secured political freedom....   [tags: Papers] 2564 words
(7.3 pages)
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Written Constitution - Written Constitution A written constitution is a formal document defining the nature of the constitutional settlement, the rules that govern the political system and the rights of citizens and governments in a codified form. The UK's constitution is not written in a single document, but derives from a number of sources that are part written and part unwritten, including accumulated conventions, works of authority, Acts of Parliament, the common law, and EU law. Historically, the UK has not had a definable statement of individual rights and freedoms either - the 1689 Bill of Rights sets out the powers of Parliament vis a vis the monarch - but rather relies on the notion of residual freedom and the concept of parliamentary sovereignty....   [tags: Papers] 730 words
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Development of the Constitution - Development of the Constitution After the failure of the Articles of Confederation, many were skeptical on how promising the new Constitution would be to the neoteric country. One of many outspoken supporters of the Constitution was federalist James Madison. In an effort to support the Constitution, James Madison had the "The Federalist No.10" published in New York newspapers. Here, Madison not only defended the Constitution, but also analyzed the republic and discussed how it was much more effective than pure Democracy when dealing with factions....   [tags: Papers] 664 words
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The Making of the Constitution - The Making of the Constitution The Constitution of the United States, the fundamental law of the United States of America. Drafted by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pa., between May 25 and Sept. 17, 1787, it is the world's oldest written constitution still in effect. The document presents a set of general principles out of which implementing statutes and codes have emerged. As such, it embodies the essence of constitutionality--that government must be confined by the rule of law....   [tags: Papers] 1453 words
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Confederation and Constitution - Confederation and Constitution After the American Revolution, a new government had to be established. The Constitution that was written took power away from the people. It led to rebellions from poor people and farmers. Daniel Shays, a former Revolutionary Army captain, led a rebellion with farmers, against laws which were not fair to the poor. They protested against excessive taxes on property, polling taxes which obtained the poor from voting, unfair actions by the court of common requests, the high cost of lawsuits, and the lack of a stable currency....   [tags: Governmental American History Essays] 1651 words
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The Australian Constitution - The Australian Constitution The founding fathers of Australia could never have predicted the society that was to come. However, the constitution- the most important document of the land- stands today with only 8 changes to the words after over 100 years of use. The constitution is not without flaws; the rights outlined in the document are far from clear, which hampers the knowledge of the public about their rights. However, this does not mean that the rights are not upheld in Australia....   [tags: Papers] 1390 words
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Cyberspace and the Constitution - Cyberspace and the Constitution Cyberspace is a new frontier for American courts. In the past, when faced with new situations, courts have analogized older laws into the new situations. However, due to the many unique qualities of the Internet, courts have had a difficult time determining how to apply prior law in the realm of cyberspace. In the United States, the ultimate framework of our laws is the United States Constitution. The Constitution, and most especially the Bill of Rights, has entered arenas that the founders could not have imagined....   [tags: Government Politics Internet Web Essays] 1152 words
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Interpreting the Constitution - When the Federalist party was organized in 1791, those people who favored a strong central government and a loose constitutional interpretation coagulated and followed the ideals of men such as Alexander Hamilton. The first opposition political party in the United States was the Republican party, which held power, nationally, between 1801 and 1825. Those who were in favor of states rights and a strict construction of the constitution fell under the leadership of Thomas Jefferson. These Jeffersonian republicans, also known as anti-federalists, believed in strict adherence to the writings of the constitution....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Making of the Constitution - A Plan in the Making Some people have always wondered whether the making of Constitution of the United States was, in fact, supposed to happen at the Constitutional Convention or if it was even supposed to be drawn up in the way it was. In this essay, I will summarize to different views on what went on at the Constitutional Convention and how the Constitution of the United States come about. I want to emphasize that none of these views or theories discussed in this essay are my own. The convention that is referred to was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania....   [tags: essays research papers] 920 words
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Written and Unwritten Components of the Constitution - A constitution is a thing antecedent to a government, and a government is only the creature of a constitution. A constitution is not the act of government, but of people constituting a government, and government without a constitution is power without a right. (1) Thomas Paine A constitution is the system of laws, customs and conventions which define the composition and power of organs of the state, and regulate the relations of the various state organs to one another and to the private citizen....   [tags: Politics, Laws, Rules of Government] 1006 words
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civics- the constitution - PART ONE- the definitions are done on the notebook along with the matching and multiple choice. SHORT ANSWER 2. A. A democracy is a form of government where the people govern themselves. A republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to make their decisions for them. A democratic republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to represent them in the affairs of the government. B. The united states government is a democratic republic. 3. A. Abraham Lincoln was describing the fact that without the consent of the people there would be no government....   [tags: essays research papers] 3739 words
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Freedom In Constitution - Have you ever wondered what life at school would be like without “freedom?” In my opinion I think it would be horrid. Think about it. If we had no freedom we wouldn’t be able to do the things we love most, or choose what friends we hang out with. The freedoms we have now we all take for granted. For example, do you even know what your freedoms are. If you don’t, then you ought to hear me out so you know in the future what they mean. First of all there are two very specific freedoms that all students and teachers should know and understand....   [tags: Personal Opinion Argument Paper Freedom] 1045 words
(3 pages)
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India's Constitution - "India must choose what will be her future constitution. I hope that the Indian people may elect to remain within the British Commonwealth.... But if she does so elect it must be by her own free will.... If, on the other hand, she elects for independence, in our view she has a right to do so.... We are very mindful of the rights of the minorities, and minorities should be able to live free from fear. On the other hand, we cannot allow a minority to place a veto in the advance of the majority."(Alexander 128) Yet people were still sceptical....   [tags: essays research papers] 2951 words
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An Adaptable Constitution and Human Rights - ... James Madison solidified this way of thinking in his summation on the eve of the American Constitutional convention. He systematically implanted a seed that fostered the strength of the Constitution through the following summation: “The great desideratum of government is such a modification of the sovereignty as will render it sufficiently neutral between the different interests and factions, to control one part of society from invading the rights of another, and at the same time sufficiently controlled it from setting up interest adverse to that of the whole society....   [tags: Political Discourse] 1628 words
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Canadian Constitution of 1982 - ... In addition, in section 93, it states that, “In and for each province the legislature may exclusively make laws in relation to education, subject and according to the following provisions…” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. It states that each Province’s Legislature can make laws in relation to education, subject according to the following necessities. This law balances the education in each province and further develops the overall structure of Canada. The Canadian Constitution is the basic life of Canada, because it details many laws starting from education to family law, that are fair to both the citizens and the government, making it a very appropriate piece of document that acts as a blueprint for the structure of Canada....   [tags: Structure of Canada]
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States was written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, where it was held in Philadelphia. It was written by a group of people known as “Farmers,” or the “Founding Fathers,” and few of the most famous Founding Fathers were George Washington (The first president of the USA), Thomas Jefferson (The first vice president and the third president of the USA) James Madison (The fourth president of the USA), Samuel Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. The old government, the Articles of Confederation was not working as it supposed to be, it was vulnerable and cannot secure and defend the new born nation and for that reason the constitution of the united states saw the light....   [tags: US Government] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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U.S. Constitution: Counter Revolutionary? - ... Government under the British did the same thing; all the power was made accessible to only the rich. The American Revolution was aimed at acquiring equal and fair representation in government for everyone. Next, the Constitution established a Supreme Court. The Supreme Court was a group of selected people who would make major legal decisions for the country. These people were not elected or chosen by the people, they were chosen by the government. This placed a form of power over the people of the United States that had been held by King George....   [tags: American Revolution, Freedom]
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Creating an Ideal Constitution - ... To accommodate all these divergent strands of a complex web of relations and write a consensual constitution is an extremely difficult and time-consuming task. But in the natural euphoria of victory, political leaders chose an unrealistic timeframe to write the constitution and made a provision in the interim constitution accordingly. Article 64 of the interim constitution stipulates that the assembly will have the tenure of two years from its first meeting unless it dissolves itself before that time....   [tags: Nepal, Due Process] 1340 words
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The Development of the American Constitution - The Articles of Confederation were approved by all the early American states in 1781, but by 1787, it was apparent that the Articles were insufficient for the young nation to operate on. A convention was formed with the priority job being to revise the Articles of Confederation; however, they only concluded that an entire new structure was needed to fulfill the demands of the growing country. The Constitution was then born. The Constitution provided the structure of government and power that was needed to achieve a strong union....   [tags: government, American history, 1787, ] 518 words
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The Constitution of the United States - ... For example, the president of the United States has the power to appoint judges and departmental secretaries. The Senate, however, must approve all of these appointments. Additionally, Congress can pass laws, but the President has the power to veto said laws. In the same way, the Supreme Court can declare a law as unconstitutional if they see it fit. But, the Congress, within each state, has the power to amend the Constitution (Mahler, 1983 and 2000). (See fig. 1.) This exemplifies that the check system in our government helps to maintain a cyclic balance of power – hence the term “checks and balances” – in order to prevent corruption in the political ideology of the nation....   [tags: Significance, Amendments, Sections] 859 words
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The American Constitution and Drug War - The consensus with regards to drug laws favors more stringent and draconian laws, with the attempt to stifle use and punish crime. There are many claims used against drug legalization, such as, moral degradation, crime, the destruction of inner cities; along with families, diseases, such as AIDS, and the corrupting of law enforcement. When one examines the effects of prohibition, one has to inquire: has the cost been worth it. Certainly, an argument for the abolition of prohibition doesn’t include the favoring of drug use, but merely recognizes the vain and utopian attempt to control individual choices....   [tags: American Government, Law, drugs, criminal justice] 2065 words
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Abortion and the California Constitution - Through out the history of the constitution of california there has been a number of attempts to change how abortion in teens is handled. Proposition 4 intends to give the parents the right to know when their unmancipated teens want to get an abortion. some supporters of this proposition argue that it will save lives and money for the state. People against it say is more dangerous to teens because they could be driven to use not regulated clinics and or to run away from home. In this research paper we will go through both points of view, and also the implications of continuing with the current constitution or changing it as the proposition 4 dictates....   [tags: Law Essays] 1917 words
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Separation of Powers in the Constitution - ... It was during the Revolutionary period that some of the states concentrate authority in the hands of the legislature, and that unhappy experience confirmed the framers belief in the merits of the separation of powers. They did not feel that separating the power by itself was enough. They were not sure if that would prevent the branches of the different governments and its officials from pooling together their authority and acting together. That is why the checks and balances came into effect....   [tags: Checks and Balances] 887 words
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The U.S. Constitution and The Patriot Act - George Washington once said, “The Constitution is the guide which I never will abandon.” The first President of the United States knew that the Constitution was and still is the greatest and most important document in America. He said that he would never abandon it and he would never deny it. He would follow it, like it was a guide. The Constitution is supposed to be a guide, which would never be neglected. However, the current government has deserted and almost discarded the United States Constitution....   [tags: Government]
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US Constitution Then and Now - The United States government was founded on a written set of principles known as the Constitution. There have only been 17 amendments, or changes, since ratification. While the United States has evolved with time the role and function of the government, and the way the government guarantees civil rights and liberties, has also evolved. These changes have resulted from changing or broadening of the interpretation of the constitution. Although the core of the constitution has not changed, it has expanded and its interpretation has changed to keep up with societal demands....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Articles of Confederation Remedied by The Constitution - The year of 1776 was a time of revolution, independence, and patriotism. American colonists had severed their umbilical cord to the Mother Country and declared themselves “Free and Independent States”.1 The chains of monarchy had been thrown off and a new government was formed. Shying away from a totalitarian government, the Second Continental Congress drafted a document called the Articles of Confederation which established a loose union of the states. It was an attempt at self-government that ended in failure....   [tags: Government]
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Development of the American Constitution - The Constitution was originally constructed as a document to unify a young nation, ensure rights, and prevent one man from having too much power. In order for the Constitution to be ratified, it evaded addressing divisive issues between the north and south, as to keep both sections of the union in favor of the Constitution. As the nation as well as its dependency on slavery grew, the ambiguity of the Constitution gave way to tension on three major issues between the abolitionist north and the pro-slavery south-what the protocol should be pertaining to runaway slaves, the slave status of newly formed states, and could states legally and peacefully secede from the Union....   [tags: american history, american government] 1682 words
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