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The Creation Of The Constitution - In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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An Essay on the Constitution - ... Disgruntled merchants complained of the lack of regulation, while frustrated merchants fussed on the tariffs that were put on foreign goods. Plus, an executive was added to implement that laws made by congress. Formerly, congress would make laws that the states could simply ignore. Thence, the executive could use his power to make sure these laws were acted upon and followed by using officials to check on the states. Accordingly, all the changes brought up by the conventions led to adjustments in original plans for the new government....   [tags: American Constitution] 1036 words
(3 pages)
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The U.S. Constitution and Slavery - The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didn’t abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself “ all men are created equal” but he owned slaves. The founding father didn’t look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution....   [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ] 409 words
(1.2 pages)
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The American Constitution - The American Constitution The basis of all law in the United States is the Constitution. This Constitution is a document written by "outcasts" of England. The Constitution of the United States sets forth the nation's fundamental laws. It establishes the form of the national government and defines the rights and liberties of the American people. It also lists the aims of the government and the methods of achieving them. The Constitution was written to organize a strong national government for the American states....   [tags: United States Constitution] 2881 words
(8.2 pages)
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The Organization of the Constitution vs. the Articles of Confederation - The Constitution is a very well organized and well thought out document that holds strong bases for the future of America, unlike the Articles of Confederation. The constitution is ultimately more detailed and intricate, giving a less questionable guideline to any future problems which may come to rise. For example, the Articles of Confederation gives us Congress, unicameral. The Constitution gives us Congress, and divides it into the Senate and the House of Representatives, becoming bicameral and more balanced in power....   [tags: Constitution, USA, congress, Articles of Confedera] 469 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Progression From The Articles of Confederation to The Constitution As a Result of Anti-Federalist, and Federalist Debate - ... Looking at this from an Anti-Federalist view I would suspect they favored the Articles limitation because giving power to the states that owned more slaves and were larger was the same thing as giving power to one ruler. They would clearly dominate and in some cases rule out smaller states. This was debated greatly because both sides were fighting for state size (larger and smaller) rule because either way one had the advantage. Another Extremely controversial issue was that of taxes. According to the Articles Taxes were Apportioned by Congress, and collected by the states....   [tags: American Constitution]
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3110 words
(8.9 pages)
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How Presidents of the United States Overstep their Bounds and Defy the Constitution - ... believed that the president has the duty to his constituencies to be “the chief domestic policy maker, and steward of the nation’s security” (Bessette, Pitney, and Jr. 431). He acted with aggression and without hesitation to meet the prevalent needs of the people. He was an energetic president who sought new policies that could help the country recover from the Great Depression and change what the public believed to be a weak governmental position regardless of its title. Yet, to many this stage in the modern presidency was just the lesser of two evils....   [tags: Politics, Constitution]
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1653 words
(4.7 pages)
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Effectiveness of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America - In this essay I will be writing about the effectiveness of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America and considering whether they achieved the purpose of making life better for African Americans. I’m going to start this essay by talking about the Amendments and what they were designed to achieve. In total there are 27 amendments to the Constitution, all with different ways to make America better. Around 1791 the first amendments were made but the amendments I will be looking at occurred later....   [tags: US Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States            The Preamble states the broad purposes the Constitution is intended to serve - to establish a government that provides for greater cooperation among the States, ensures justice and peace, provides for defense against foreign enemies, promotes the general well-being of the people, and secures liberty now and in the future.      Article I of the Constitution is based on the legislative department. Section 1. Legislative Power; the Congress: is the nations lawmaking body....   [tags: Constitution Summary Essays] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Constitution - ... It’s the Supreme Court, courts of appeal, and district courts. This branch works with the legislative branch and executive branch. The courts can go to the legislative branch and declare laws unconstitutional. The courts can also go to the executive branch and declare presidential act unconstitutional. The executive branch is the president. It involves the executive office of the president, executive and cabinet departments and independent government agencies. It works with the legislative and judicial branch....   [tags: Political Science]
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1031 words
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America's Accountability to its Constitution and the Events at Abu Ghraib - Our constitution is built upon the ideas of freedom and decency. After all, it was written after hundreds of years worth of tyranny both at home in England (at the time), and abroad. People were standing against oppression leveled against them from thousands of miles away (for example, the Boston Tea Party), and they were called traitors to the Crown. Today, if someone speaks out against the US and its oppression, or chooses to fight back, we call him an insurgent or a terrorist. It’s quite a twist....   [tags: constitution, USA, government, Abu Ghraib, ]
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771 words
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States The United States Constitution is the law of the United States. It is the foundation of this country and the most important document in its history. It provides the guidelines for the government and citizens of the United States. The Constitution will unquestionably continue to carry us into the 22nd century, just as it has for over two hundred years. The principles of the Constitution remain strong to this day, especially with respect to our government and to the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Law Land US History Constitution Government] 1412 words
(4 pages)
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The Second Amendment of the Constitution - The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” This timeless phrase, the Second Amendment of the United States’ Constitution, is an enduring example of the principles and ideals that our country was founded on. With this statement, the founders of this country explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 503 words
(1.4 pages)
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Impact of the Gulf War, September 11th, and the War in Iraq on the U.S. Constitution - The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was completed on September, 1787, with its adoption by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was later ratified by special conventions in each of the original thirteen states. It created a more unified and defined government in place of what was then a group of free and independent states operating under the Articles of Confederation. During its history there have been a numerous number of events which have occurred which have seriously tested this Constitution After conflicts in South Korea, the two World Wars and Vietname the next conflict to have tested the Constitution was the first Gulf War in 1991....   [tags: American Constitution] 1082 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Constitution - Every society has certain standards which ensure that its members' actions do not harm the same society. There are two types of standards, Verbal Standards, which are not written down but are taken for granted and handed down from generation to generation. These can be applied differently depending on the case. There are also Written Standards, which are written down. These are hard to change, but much easier to apply than the Verbal Standards. In a Democratic State, the main set of rules is called the Constitution....   [tags: Law] 328 words
(0.9 pages)
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The Constitution - The Constitution A case for the connection of America's colonial and revolutionary religious and political experiences to the basic principles of the Constitution can be readily made. One point in favor of this conclusion is the fact that most Americans at that time had little beside their experiences on which to base their political ideas. This is due to the lack of advanced schooling among common Americans at that time. Other points also concur with the main idea and make the theory of the connection plausible....   [tags: American America History] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
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constitution - The Constitution itself did not mention political parties, and it was assumed that none was going to arise. But this was soon proven wrong when the debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in 1787 and 1788 stir into a two party system. This soon led to a permanent feature in American policies. In early times, groups of people formed temporary assembly and voted together either for or against a specific policy. When the policy was settled, the assemblies would dissolve. The Federalists and Anti-Federalist was sort of like these assemblies, but they didn’t dissolve that easily....   [tags: essays research papers] 386 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Constitution - CONSTITUTION ARTICLE I Name This organization shall be named the Hippocratic Society ARTICLE II Purpose The purpose of the Hippocratic Society, hereafter referred to as the Society, shall be to foster and broaden the intellectual perspectives of those with an interest in medicine; to facilitate this end, the club shall hold regular meetings, sponsor, when possible, academic and social pursuits such as guest speakers, attendances at state and national conventions of interest, and interaction with students at other colleges akin interests....   [tags: essays research papers] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Constitution - The Constitution of the United States was made from scratch in 1787. Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, and James Monroe were some of the most prominent and popular of the founding fathers that helped make it. The Constitution has many elements of it that were a compromise between different factions with in the colonies. Most of the delegates tried to look past their own partial interests in order to create a strong national government for the people. James Madison the "father of the Constitution" drafted a proposed plan of national government....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Constitution - Forming a new nation with its own values and beliefs was a very daunting task. It was supremely difficult when the members of the nation were holding on to the beliefs of the old ruling country. It was believed that to be a leader you had to be in the upper classes, a so called aristocrat. To be an aristocrat you had to posses large sums of land and property. Property was not in the sense we think of today. Back then, slaves were also considered property. So the vast majority of our leaders owned slaves....   [tags: American History] 597 words
(1.7 pages)
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Constitution Timeline - ... In the place of the contract that was invalid colonist decided to create a contract for themselves while on the Mayflower that would allow them to establish their own authority (Mount, 2010). This contract became signified as the Mayflower Compact, a contract that highlighted the ideas of John Locke. In the Compact, the signers agreed to bind themselves into a society to preserve order and to help further their aims. They agreed to create offices, laws, and constitutions that will aid the common good....   [tags: U.S. History]
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1154 words
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The U.S. Constitution - ... The courts also have the power of judicial review—to declare a law unconstitutional. Due to the decision of Chief Justice John Marshall the Supreme Court has this power from the case of Marbury v. Madison in 1801. The case Marbury v. Madison took place during the election of 1800 when Thomas Jefferson defeated President John Adams, but the new administration did not take office until March of 1801. When the new administration took office James Madison (Secretary of State) discovered that some commissions were not delivered....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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1215 words
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The Arizona Constitution - ... The counties of Arizona follow the oldest pattern of government dividing power between an elected leader and many individually elected officials. The leader of county government is the board of supervisors. They vary in size depending on the size of the county. The rest of the officials include a sheriff, county attorney, recorder, treasurer, assessor, superior court clerk, and a superintendent of schools (McClory, 2001). The traditional form of government has been blamed for many of Arizona’s counties troubles....   [tags: Government]
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1015 words
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Provisions of the Constitution - ... Article 12 defines the framework for the counties, while section 3 deals with offices that are in a county. These offices are: sheriff, county attorney, a recorder, a treasurer, an assessor, a superintendant of schools and least three supervisors. This section also sets terms of office of each. Section V of Arizona’s Constitution deals with counties that are more than five hundred thousand population living in them. The matter of charter governments is settled by Article 12 Section VIIII, and states that committees execute themselves....   [tags: Government]
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1590 words
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The Arizona Constitution - Running head: ARIZONA CONSTITUTION Arizona Constitution Arizona Constitution Arizona gain statehood on February 14, 1912 as the forty-eighth state in the union. There were several events that led Arizona to statehood. President William Taft vetoed the first document for Arizona to become a state because he did not believe that citizens should use recall to remove judges from office (GCU, 2008). This essay will give a detail timeline of the events leading up to Arizona becoming a state and the adoption of the Arizona Constitution....   [tags: State History]
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1213 words
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Creating the Constitution - ... Constitution. The Federalists realized there was a need for a central government that could more effectively defend against a foreign force. The Federalists sought to improve many of the deficiencies of the Confederation through the establishment and ratification of the United States Constitution of America. The Federalists believed the Confederation was insufficient in preserving the Union (Hamilton). The Federalists strongly believed that “…a cordial Union, under an efficient national government” provided them “the best security that can be devised against HOSTILITIES from abroad” (Jay)....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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2111 words
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The US Constitution - The plan to divide the government into three branches was proposed by James Madison, at the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He modeled the division from who he referred to as ‘the Perfect Governor,’ as he read Isaiah 33:22; “For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord is our king; He will save us.” http://www.eadshome.com/QuotesoftheFounders.htm The founding fathers of the American Constitution divided the government up into the following three branches to prevent the majority from ruling with an iron fist; legislative, judicial, and executive....   [tags: US History] 1697 words
(4.8 pages)
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Confederation and Constitution - ... Another strength that the Article of Confederations had was to coin and borrow money. The Article of Confederations even detailed with foreign countries and sign treaties. Even though the Article of Confederation had its strength, it also had its weaknesses. The Articles of Confederation was the first official government of the United States and there were lots weaknesses. The national government could not power the states to follow its laws. It did not have the authority to implement laws. Congress did not have a strong and steady leadership....   [tags: U.S. History ]
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1540 words
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The US Constitution - ... The Supreme Court outlines that this case is about an exclusion order and not racial prejudice, “Our task is simply, our duty clear…we are specifically dealing with nothing but an exclusion order. To cast this case into the outlines or racial prejudice…merely confuses the issue.” (Korematsu, 358) Korematsu was a loyal citizen of the U.S., his loyalty was never attested; nevertheless, he faced charges against him because he refused to obey an order which singled him out because of his ancestry....   [tags: American History, Democracy, Equal Rights] 1435 words
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Amendments to the Constitution - The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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Drafting the Constitution - By the late eighteenth century, America found itself independent from England; which was a welcomed change, but also brought with it, its own set of challenges. The newly formed National Government was acting under the Articles of Confederation, which established a “firm league of friendship” between the states, but did not give adequate power to run the country. To ensure the young nation could continue independently, Congress called for a Federal Convention to convene in Philadelphia to address the deficiencies in the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: American History] 2555 words
(7.3 pages)
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Comparing the United States Constitution with Local State Constitutions - ... The difference in the lengths of the two constitutions is apparent. The former is merely 7,000 words long, while the latter averages about 36,000 words (Morris, Henson, & Fackler, 2011). In an effort to ensure the longevity of the document, the Framers opted to construct a shorter, more general contract which would apply to the large group of people it expects to govern, rather than a long, detailed one which would cater to particular people or areas. The states have taken an entirely different route....   [tags: Government]
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855 words
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Constitutional Changes Made for the Better - The contentious debate over the replacement of the U.S. Constitution has brought both joy and conflict to America abroad. Many ideals and beliefs that were unable to be settled upon by the noble drafters hundreds of years ago shall be brought back into discussion. As it is obvious that many changes have shaped America to be very different than it was in 1789, many of the principles of democracy in this great article have held up regardless. I believe that our Constitution has more than proved itself to be competent in regards to governing its people, with over 200 years without change....   [tags: U.S. Constitution]
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1026 words
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Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment of the Constitution - Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment Over the centuries, the Supreme Court has always ruled that the 2nd Amendment protects the states' militia's rights to bear arms, and that this protection does not extend to individuals. In fact, legal scholars consider the issue "settled law." For this reason, the gun lobby does not fight for its perceived constitutional right to keep and bear arms before the Supreme Court, but in Congress. Interestingly, even interpreting an individual right in the 2nd Amendment presents the gun lobby with some thorny problems, like the right to keep and bear nuclear weapons....   [tags: Constituton Bill Rights Right To Bear Arms] 1611 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Constitution of the U.K. - The Constitution of the U.K. There are two meanings to the word constitution the first is that It will contain all of the rules for the organisation of the state.and secondly It will usuall be ‘entrenced’ which means that it is hard to change. The constitution of a country is a set of rules regulating the powers of its government and the rights and duties of its citizens. In all but a few democracies in the world, the nation's constitution can be found in a single document. The exceptions are Israel, New Zealand and the United Kingdom....   [tags: Papers] 1232 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Constitution of a State - The Constitution of a State A constitution is a set of rules and principles on how a country is governed. Competition for political power in most countries is fierce, so rules are needed to control the competition for power to ensure it takes place within satisfactory limits. Professor KC Wheare defines the constitution of a state as: …the whole system of a government of a country, the collection of rules, which establish and regulate or govern the government. (Barnett, P7) An older definition, that of Thomas Paine, reveals a more complex set of ideas: A constitution is not the act of a government, but of a people constituting a government, and a government without a constitution is a power without right…A constitution is a thing antecedent to a government; and a government is the only creature of a constitution....   [tags: Papers] 1688 words
(4.8 pages)
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Constitution Comparison - Constitution Comparison By AntiYuke I compared the U.S.A. constitution and the Australian constitution. Their differences are as abundant as their similarities. The Australian constitution is extremely long and drawn out, where as the United States constitution sticks right to the point. All in all, the two constitutions have the same goal in that they wish to bestow the same basic rights to each person. The two constitutions both have a preamble, however the Australian constitution is many more times greater in length....   [tags: essays research papers] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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The British Constitution - The British Constitution A constitution is a set of laws on how a country is governed. The British Constitution is unwritten, unlike the constitution in America, and, as such, is referred to as an uncodified constitution. The British Constitution can be found in a variety of documents. Supporters of our constitution believe that the current way allows for flexibility and change to occur without too many problems. Those who want a written constitution believe that it should be codified so that the public as a whole has access to it – as opposed to just constitutional experts who know where to look and how to interpret it....   [tags: Papers] 491 words
(1.4 pages)
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The Constitution "Understood" - The Jeffersonian-Republicans are characterized by their strict interpretation of the constitution, in stark contrast with the Federalists loose or broad interpretation. The Federalists believed that anything the constitution did not forbid it permitted, contrary to the Jeffersonian view that anything it did not permit it forbade. The Federalists advocated the “necessary” and “proper” clause, and their faith rested heavily in the virtue of implied powers. The Jeffersonian party believed that all powers not specifically granted to the central government were reserved to the states, disregarding the implication of inferred powers....   [tags: essays research papers] 678 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Ratification of the Constitution - The Ratification of the Constitution      In 1787, the Constitution was created to replace the Articles of Confederation, because it was felt that the Articles weren’t sufficient for running the country. However, the Constitution was not very well liked by everyone .      The constitution created was very much liked by the majority of the country. This included the farmers, the merchants, the mechanics, and other of the common people. However, there were those who were very important people in the revolution who felt that the Constitution would not work, most notably Patrick Henry and Thomas Paine, who felt they were the backbone of the revolution....   [tags: American History] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
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Factions and the Constitution - Factions and the Constitution The framers designed the Constitution in such a way as to lessen the influence of political parties in American government, however at the same time, the very essence to the formation of political parties, liberty, was left in the Constitution. Both Madison and Schattschneider cite that while the Constitution does not support factions, it cannot abolish them because of the fact that the Constitution was designed to protect the liberties of the citizens. They both go on to say that liberty is the spark, which causes political parties to develop....   [tags: Papers] 419 words
(1.2 pages)
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Prostituting the Constitution - Prostituting the Constitution It has become fashionable to propose amendments to the constitution for all imaginable causes. Thus the nation's charter is endangered by a barrage of new and unworthy ideas offered up by opportunistic politicians seeking to exploit popular passions. Indeed, constitutional reform seems to be the hot topic around Washington and in the writings of both liberal and conservative journalists across the country. No longer is it suitable for legislation to follow the normal means of entering into law - ratification by both House and Senate, pending the signature of the President....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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U.S. Constitution - The document I chose to write about is the United States Constitution. When the thirteen British colonies in North America declared their independence in 1776, they laid down that “governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” The “colonies” had to establish a government, which would be the framework for the United States. The purpose of a written constitution is to define and therefore more specifically limit government powers. After the Articles of Confederation failed to work in the 13 colonies, the U.S....   [tags: essays research papers] 430 words
(1.2 pages)
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Powers of the Constitution - Powers of the Constitution The national and state governments derive their respective powers from the Constitution in several ways. Some powers are explicitly stated while others are not. Understanding the various types of powers can be difficult and this essay is an attempt to clarify them. The Tenth Amendment of the Constitution states, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people." From this amendment we first learn of delegated and reserved powers....   [tags: Papers] 547 words
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Federal Constitution - The simple turn of a century from the late 1700's to the 1800's brought about drastic change in regard to the United States government. Not only had the rebellious colonies overthrown the oppressive rule of their mother country Britain, but they had already begun to establish their own political domain. Within this realm of the newly founded democracy were two conflicting parties. On one side was the Jeffersonian Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson himself and later on by James Madison. Those who composed this legislative faction tended to believe in strong state governments, a feeble central government, and a rigid interpretation of the constitution....   [tags: Political Science] 1190 words
(3.4 pages)
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Inequality and Constitution - Liberty, as defined by the Oxford dictionary, is explained as the “condition of being free from restriction or control; the right and power to act, believe or express oneself in a manner of one’s own choosing”. Liberty is a word familiar to most Americans, since the fundamentals of the country is based on freedom and independence. Symbolism of liberty (such as the national’s flag, statue of liberty, the liberty bell, Uncle Sam, the bald eagle) can be seen throughout the United States as a reminder of the freedom in which this nation has achieved for over the past two hundred years....   [tags: essays research papers] 2607 words
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The Us Constitution - In February of 1787, the Continental Congress met in Philadelphia to revise or replace the Articles of Confederation. This revision was necessary to fix the problems the newly independent states were having. Fifty five delegates attended the convention such as James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Roger Sherman. These delegates included the two schools of jurisdiction, compact and contract, into the Constitution to help make it one of the most important documents ever written. A compact school of jurisprudence is a tightly bound set of laws by which a society lives by....   [tags: American History] 332 words
(0.9 pages)
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A Written Constitution - A Written Constitution A written constitution is a formal document that defines the nature of constitutional agreements; theses include rules that govern the political system and the rights of citizens and governments in a codified form. The UK's constitution is unwritten as it hails from no single written document, but derives from a number of sources that can be said to be written and part unwritten, examples of this include conventions, works of authority, Acts of Parliament, EU law and common law....   [tags: Papers] 786 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Weimar Constitution - The Weimar Constitution In January 1919 Hugo Preuss, whom was a left wing liberal set out to make a constitution, which was drawn up and submitted to the national assembly in Weimar. Historian William Carr says, “Preuss set out to combine democracy and parliamentary government with a high degree of centralisation for the left wing” which meant he was trying to give power to the left. Following extensive debates the constitution was eventually declared on 11 August 1919. This constitution contained 181 articles which was divided up into different groups called ‘ Rights and Duties of the German people’ and also ‘Structures and Functions of the Reich....   [tags: Papers] 1253 words
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The Godless Constitution - The Godless Constitution When some people here the words “the godless constitution” uttered the shrill up their noses and get very defensive. Kramnick and Moore address this idea of the United States Constitution being godless. They speak about how America has misinterpreted views and how society would benefit from an understanding of what the Constitution stands for and how to correctly use it. They strive to help America understand that politics driven by religion and faith would do the most damage to the political agenda....   [tags: essays research papers] 996 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Australian Constitution - The Australian Constitution Will Australia become a republic in the next twenty years. This is a difficult question to speculate on. The main area of law governing this issue is section 128 of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (U.K). Other issues in this debate are regarding appointment, termination and the powers to be awarded to the proposed Head of State, and the impact the change will have on the States. Examining the history of Australian Legislative powers, and reasons why Australians would want to change, is also useful when speculating on this issue....   [tags: Papers] 1043 words
(3 pages)
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The British Constitution - The British Constitution The constitution of Britain has traditionally been split between royal prerogative statutes, common law, convention, convention and authoritative opinion. But recent external developments such as the European Union (EU) and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) have had a strong influence on Britain. The Royal Prerogative are a set of privileges that the Royal family since the Middle Ages. However, as the power of the monarchy declined, the power was now with the Prime minister and his cabinet....   [tags: Papers] 380 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Threat of the Constitution - The Threat of the Constitution The fundamental point of contention between the Federalists and anti-Federalists in their debates over ratification of the Constitution surrounded the question of what powers were necessary in order to insure the security of the nation as a whole. The federalists, of course, believed that a strong central government was necessary, for reasons of national security and economic prosperity. The anti-Federalists were strongly opposed to the centralization of power, rather, they were concerned with retaining the sovereignty of the states and, in turn, their secured political freedom....   [tags: Papers] 2564 words
(7.3 pages)
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Written Constitution - Written Constitution A written constitution is a formal document defining the nature of the constitutional settlement, the rules that govern the political system and the rights of citizens and governments in a codified form. The UK's constitution is not written in a single document, but derives from a number of sources that are part written and part unwritten, including accumulated conventions, works of authority, Acts of Parliament, the common law, and EU law. Historically, the UK has not had a definable statement of individual rights and freedoms either - the 1689 Bill of Rights sets out the powers of Parliament vis a vis the monarch - but rather relies on the notion of residual freedom and the concept of parliamentary sovereignty....   [tags: Papers] 730 words
(2.1 pages)
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Development of the Constitution - Development of the Constitution After the failure of the Articles of Confederation, many were skeptical on how promising the new Constitution would be to the neoteric country. One of many outspoken supporters of the Constitution was federalist James Madison. In an effort to support the Constitution, James Madison had the "The Federalist No.10" published in New York newspapers. Here, Madison not only defended the Constitution, but also analyzed the republic and discussed how it was much more effective than pure Democracy when dealing with factions....   [tags: Papers] 664 words
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The Making of the Constitution - The Making of the Constitution The Constitution of the United States, the fundamental law of the United States of America. Drafted by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pa., between May 25 and Sept. 17, 1787, it is the world's oldest written constitution still in effect. The document presents a set of general principles out of which implementing statutes and codes have emerged. As such, it embodies the essence of constitutionality--that government must be confined by the rule of law....   [tags: Papers] 1453 words
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Confederation and Constitution - Confederation and Constitution After the American Revolution, a new government had to be established. The Constitution that was written took power away from the people. It led to rebellions from poor people and farmers. Daniel Shays, a former Revolutionary Army captain, led a rebellion with farmers, against laws which were not fair to the poor. They protested against excessive taxes on property, polling taxes which obtained the poor from voting, unfair actions by the court of common requests, the high cost of lawsuits, and the lack of a stable currency....   [tags: Governmental American History Essays] 1651 words
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The Australian Constitution - The Australian Constitution The founding fathers of Australia could never have predicted the society that was to come. However, the constitution- the most important document of the land- stands today with only 8 changes to the words after over 100 years of use. The constitution is not without flaws; the rights outlined in the document are far from clear, which hampers the knowledge of the public about their rights. However, this does not mean that the rights are not upheld in Australia....   [tags: Papers] 1390 words
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Cyberspace and the Constitution - Cyberspace and the Constitution Cyberspace is a new frontier for American courts. In the past, when faced with new situations, courts have analogized older laws into the new situations. However, due to the many unique qualities of the Internet, courts have had a difficult time determining how to apply prior law in the realm of cyberspace. In the United States, the ultimate framework of our laws is the United States Constitution. The Constitution, and most especially the Bill of Rights, has entered arenas that the founders could not have imagined....   [tags: Government Politics Internet Web Essays] 1152 words
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Interpreting the Constitution - When the Federalist party was organized in 1791, those people who favored a strong central government and a loose constitutional interpretation coagulated and followed the ideals of men such as Alexander Hamilton. The first opposition political party in the United States was the Republican party, which held power, nationally, between 1801 and 1825. Those who were in favor of states rights and a strict construction of the constitution fell under the leadership of Thomas Jefferson. These Jeffersonian republicans, also known as anti-federalists, believed in strict adherence to the writings of the constitution....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Making of the Constitution - A Plan in the Making Some people have always wondered whether the making of Constitution of the United States was, in fact, supposed to happen at the Constitutional Convention or if it was even supposed to be drawn up in the way it was. In this essay, I will summarize to different views on what went on at the Constitutional Convention and how the Constitution of the United States come about. I want to emphasize that none of these views or theories discussed in this essay are my own. The convention that is referred to was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania....   [tags: essays research papers] 920 words
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civics- the constitution - PART ONE- the definitions are done on the notebook along with the matching and multiple choice. SHORT ANSWER 2. A. A democracy is a form of government where the people govern themselves. A republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to make their decisions for them. A democratic republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to represent them in the affairs of the government. B. The united states government is a democratic republic. 3. A. Abraham Lincoln was describing the fact that without the consent of the people there would be no government....   [tags: essays research papers] 3739 words
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Written and Unwritten Components of the Constitution - ... a constitution as a single document, the doctrine of separation of powers, and flexibility and entrenchment of written and unwritten constitutions First of all, a written constitution is a codified single document which comprises rules of governing a country as well as rights, duties and freedoms of individuals within the country. However, an unwritten constitution, also termed as an uncodified constitution, is diverse of different pieces of legislation, customs and political conventions....   [tags: Politics, Laws, Rules of Government] 1006 words
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Freedom In Constitution - Have you ever wondered what life at school would be like without “freedom?” In my opinion I think it would be horrid. Think about it. If we had no freedom we wouldn’t be able to do the things we love most, or choose what friends we hang out with. The freedoms we have now we all take for granted. For example, do you even know what your freedoms are. If you don’t, then you ought to hear me out so you know in the future what they mean. First of all there are two very specific freedoms that all students and teachers should know and understand....   [tags: Personal Opinion Argument Paper Freedom] 1045 words
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India's Constitution - "India must choose what will be her future constitution. I hope that the Indian people may elect to remain within the British Commonwealth.... But if she does so elect it must be by her own free will.... If, on the other hand, she elects for independence, in our view she has a right to do so.... We are very mindful of the rights of the minorities, and minorities should be able to live free from fear. On the other hand, we cannot allow a minority to place a veto in the advance of the majority."(Alexander 128) Yet people were still sceptical....   [tags: essays research papers] 2951 words
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The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States was written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, where it was held in Philadelphia. It was written by a group of people known as “Farmers,” or the “Founding Fathers,” and few of the most famous Founding Fathers were George Washington (The first president of the USA), Thomas Jefferson (The first vice president and the third president of the USA) James Madison (The fourth president of the USA), Samuel Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. The old government, the Articles of Confederation was not working as it supposed to be, it was vulnerable and cannot secure and defend the new born nation and for that reason the constitution of the united states saw the light....   [tags: US Government] 754 words
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The Development of the American Constitution - The Articles of Confederation were approved by all the early American states in 1781, but by 1787, it was apparent that the Articles were insufficient for the young nation to operate on. A convention was formed with the priority job being to revise the Articles of Confederation; however, they only concluded that an entire new structure was needed to fulfill the demands of the growing country. The Constitution was then born. The Constitution provided the structure of government and power that was needed to achieve a strong union....   [tags: government, American history, 1787, ] 518 words
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The American Constitution and Drug War - ... This is to say, the Constitution and constitutional laws shall be the supreme law of the land. It doesn’t say unconstitutional laws are the supreme law of the land; for an unconstitutional law, by its definition, is no law at all. Since no power was given to the federal government—without an amendment—to ban, outlaw, or punish users of drugs, the federal drug laws are unconstitutional. William Davie, a delegate to the Constitutional Convention from North Carolina expressed his view that the constitution was only supreme in the powers specifically granted, and not in usurpations (Elliott, 1987)....   [tags: American Government, Law, drugs, criminal justice] 2065 words
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Abortion and the California Constitution - Through out the history of the constitution of california there has been a number of attempts to change how abortion in teens is handled. Proposition 4 intends to give the parents the right to know when their unmancipated teens want to get an abortion. some supporters of this proposition argue that it will save lives and money for the state. People against it say is more dangerous to teens because they could be driven to use not regulated clinics and or to run away from home. In this research paper we will go through both points of view, and also the implications of continuing with the current constitution or changing it as the proposition 4 dictates....   [tags: Law Essays] 1917 words
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The U.S. Constitution and The Patriot Act - ... Before the Act was passed, the FBI and CIA were not able to share protected information. The Act has fortunately made it unlawful to knowingly shelter a terrorist. Also, there is now permission for law enforcement administrators to obtain a court order to wiretap any phone that could be in use by a suspected terrorist. Additionally, this Act tripled the amount of Border Patrol, Customs Service Inspectors and Immigration and Naturalization Service inspectors at the United States borders. Furthermore, it helped to provide one hundred million dollars, which helped to improve the equipment and technology used at the American borders....   [tags: Government]
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US Constitution Then and Now - ... Clearly, food pyramids and wind energies were not governmental functions at the time of our founding fathers. Another example of government’s functional expansion is evidenced in the regulation of the economy. Since the Constitution was written the government has had a hand in the economy, however the proverbial hand has grown bigger and stronger. For instance, the Federal Trade Commission, FTC, came to be around 1913 and its rulings have had varying levels of impact to the economy. FTC rulings include: do not call legislation, funeral industry regulation, and antitrust rulings in the petroleum industry....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Articles of Confederation Remedied by The Constitution - ... This made it difficult for outside states to compete with local producers. Alexander Hamilton noted that “The interfering and unneighborly regulations of some States... [were] contrary to the true spirit of the union.”4 Another problem was that the national government could not place a tariff on imported goods. This made it hard for Americans to compete with the prices of foreign traders. The Constitution fixed this by saying “The Congress shall have Power to Regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States...”5 States, regardless of population, had equal representation in Congress under the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: Government]
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Development of the American Constitution - The Constitution was originally constructed as a document to unify a young nation, ensure rights, and prevent one man from having too much power. In order for the Constitution to be ratified, it evaded addressing divisive issues between the north and south, as to keep both sections of the union in favor of the Constitution. As the nation as well as its dependency on slavery grew, the ambiguity of the Constitution gave way to tension on three major issues between the abolitionist north and the pro-slavery south-what the protocol should be pertaining to runaway slaves, the slave status of newly formed states, and could states legally and peacefully secede from the Union....   [tags: american history, american government] 1682 words
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The Constitution and the U.S. Government - ... Though the state court then tried to refute the ruling by the basis that the Supreme Court had no right to interfere in state cases to which the Supreme Court "established the principle that the court had jurisdiction over the state courts in cases involving the constitutional rights (Newman and Schmalbach). Another case, Cohens v. Virginia (1821), relates this issue as well. Congress created the lottery system in D.C. and The Cohen brothers then ensued in selling these tickets in Virginia, which was in violation of the state law....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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The Development to The United States Constitution - ... Unfortunately, doing so required a unanimous vote among the states and the Confederation Congress could not leverage such unanimity. In September of 1786, representatives from the five states bordering the Chesapeake Bay convened in Annapolis, Maryland, for the supposed purpose of discussing trade issues. “The Nationalists among the Annapolis Convention delegates proceeded to plant the seed of a peaceful counterrevolution against the Confederation Congress” (Text, 109). The Nationalist delegates at this convention purposed to invite representatives from all thirteen states to a meeting in Philadelphia in the spring of 1787....   [tags: American History]
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The Abolition of Slavery and the American Constitution - In 1688 the first American movement was the one to abolish slavery when the German and Quakers decent in Pennsylvania. The Quakers establishment had no immediate action for the Quaker Petition against slavery. The first American abolition society was the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully by the Quakers that had strong religious objections of slavery. In 1756 John Woolman gave up his business to campaign against slavery along with other Quakers. Thomas Paine was the first to write an article about the United States abolition of slavery and it was titled “African Slavery in America”....   [tags: american history, slavery] 726 words
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The Australia Constitution's Definition of Marriage - Section 51 (xxi) of the Australia Constitution gives Commonwealth power to regulate and define the meaning of marriage. It has been defined as “a formal, monogamous and heterosexual union for life”. This definition of marriage is taken from the 19th century English cases, which are Hyde v Hyde and Woodmansee . However, nowadays, people start to challenge the definition of marriage given in the constitution and demand for the change. They want the definition of marriage includes same sex couples and these couples been given the same rights as heterosexual couples....   [tags: Same Sex Marriage ] 997 words
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Traditional Leadership and The Constitution - ... Even though traditional leadership has faced many challenges, almost certainly the most important and testing challenge they face, is their vulnerable relationship with the government. This relationship needs to be healthy and strong, based on trust, mutual understanding and co-operation. However this relationship in addition, not only needs to be maintained on a national level, but also on a provincial and local level. If traditional leaders disregard these relationships, it would have direct impact on their communities who are dependant on the services and protection of these additional levels of government....   [tags: Government]
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The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution - ... Mandatory minimum sentences began in 1951 when Congress passed the Boggs Act, allowing for tough mandatory sentences for drug offenses and inhibiting the discretion of the judiciary. The controversy regarding mandatory minimum sentences stems from the arbitrary nature of the sentences imposed and specifically the disparities that exist in sentences dependent upon the drug the offender is in possession of. Further, there is concern that without the ability to consider any mitigating factors judges are forced to impose sentences that may be unjust in terms of length....   [tags: U.S. Law]
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The Declaration of Independence and Constitutional Law - ... As mentioned by Michael P. Zuckert, the significance of the Declaration of Independence can be understood in Jefferson’s simple syllogism. The Preamble, the first paragraph, introduces the reason for the Declaration. First, by stating that under certain conditions, uprising is justifiable; “When in the course of human events… a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to separate.” Next, in the list of grievances, Jefferson list that those conditions exist, thus, the rebellious uprising of the colonies is justifiable....   [tags: constitution, American government]
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