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Colonialist Oppression in "Marrakech" - "Marrakech," an essay by George Orwell, accomplishes a key balance by providing descriptive imagery, literal and direct views that are presented through the diction, and transitioning the narrator from one setting to the next. This balance allows the reader to fully grasp Orwell's intent of showing the reader that colonialism has corrupted the views of the white society, leading to their lack of acknowledgement of any dignity that the most unfortunate people in humanity may have. Orwell is clearly trying to get a point across to the reader, and he wants to make a lasting impression with it....   [tags: European Literature] 573 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Lie of Imperialism Exposed in Literature - If postcolonial literature is the “process of dialogue and necessary correction,” of misconceptions concerning colonialism, then a comparative study of colonial and postcolonial works is essential for attaining a full understanding of the far-reaching effects of European imperialism (Groden and Kreiswirth 582). Reading colonial literature in dialogue with postcolonial literature engenders a more complete interpretation of the effects of imperialism by creating a point of reference from which to begin the revelation and the healing of cultural wounds resultant from European colonialism....   [tags: Literature]
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3045 words
(8.7 pages)
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Things Fall Apart - Things Fall Apart Things Fall Apart was published in 1958. Its fundamental theme, in Achebe's words, is "that African people did not hear of culture for the first time from Europeans." It is a celebration of the depth, value, and beauty of tribal society. Also of the "dignity that African people all but lost during the colonial period. This novel has been translated into over forty languages and has sold well over three million copies. The title of this novel is taken from a W.B. Yeats poem, 'The Second Coming': Things Fall Apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned....   [tags: Chinoe Achebe] 1720 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Immortality and Blindness to a Dark Continent - The Immortality and Blindness to a Dark Continent Joseph Conrad’s s novel “Heart of Darkness” portrays an image of Africa that is dark and inhuman. Not only does he describe the actual, physical continent of Africa as “so hopeless and so dark, so impenetrable to human thought, so pitiless to human weakness”, (Conrad 2180) as though the continent could neither breed nor support any true human life. Conrad lived through a time when European colonies were scattered all over the world. This phenomenon and the doctrine of colonialism bought into at his time obviously influenced his views at the time of “Heart of Darkness” publication....   [tags: Heart of Darkness Joseph Conrad Analysis] 1683 words
(4.8 pages)
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Pepe le Moko - Julien Duvivier’s film “Pépé le Moko” is a remarkable story, and a powerful personal account of French colonial life. The socio-political subtext of the story is an important one, which brings to the forefront the particular allure of Casbah and the idiosyncrasies of its inhabitants. This subtext of the narrative connotes the desire and fascination with the exotic. Jean Gabin’s character is a thief, who while running from the law becomes immersed in the maze of the city of Casbah. In light of Edward Said’s ideas of Orientalism, specifically in terms of the cultural exchanges that take place in the affiliation of colonialism, the foreign element (as an “other”) can become a model with which Western civilization defines itself....   [tags: Julien Duvivier film Pepe le Moko] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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Aime Cesaire's A Tempest Clarifies Shakespeare's The Tempest - Cesaire's A Tempest Clarifies Shakespeare's The Tempest       "Negritude, originally a literary and ideological movement of French-speaking black intellectuals, reflects an important and comprehensive reaction to the colonial situation of European colonization" (Carlberg).  This movement, which influenced Africans as well as blacks around the world, specifically rejects the political, social, and moral domination of the West.   Leopold Senghor, Leon Damas, and Aime Cesaire are the three pioneers of the revolution.  The founder who expresses his ideas more broadly, though, is Cesaire, who uses literary works to express his viewpoint on colonization.  An excellent example of such a tactic is his play, A Tempest, which is a revision of William Shakespeare's The Tempest.  Both Shakespeare and Cesaire accentuate the greed of Europeans in their plays.  However, Cesaire is more obvious in his approach to exposing it.  A comparison of the two plays demonstrates that Cesaire's version, written in the late 1960's, is written as a confrontation of Shakespeare's play.  He is attempting to comment on the corruption of Colonialism and the European domination of the New World through such strategies as making seemingly minor changes, switching the main character role, and altering the storyline itself....   [tags: Tempest essays]
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1684 words
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tempcolon Comparing Language in Shakespeare's Tempest and Aime Cesaire's A Tempest - Colonial Language in Shakespeare's The Tempest and Aime Cesaire's A Tempest       Language and literature are the most subtle and seductive tools of domination. They gradually shape thoughts and attitudes on an almost subconscious level. Perhaps Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak states this condition most succinctly in her essay "The Burden of English" when she writes, "Literature buys your assent in an almost clandestine way...for good or ill, as medicine or poison, perhaps always a bit of both"(137)....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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887 words
(2.5 pages)
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Light and Dark in Heart of Darkness - Light and Dark in Heart of Darkness     The brightest of lights can obscure vision while darkness can contain truths: one must not be distracted by the sheen of light, which conceals the deeper reality present in darkness. Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness illustrates this idea with the use of several symbols. White Europeans are used as symbols of self-deception, and objects with an alabaster quality are symbols of barriers to inner truth. Black is the foil of white; it represents the inner truth beneath the white surface reality....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
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1182 words
(3.4 pages)
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Metropolitan vs. Colonial Space in Forster’s A Passage to India and Lawrence’s Women in Love - Metropolitan vs. Colonial Space in Forster’s A Passage to India and Lawrence’s Women in Love       At first glance, it seems easy to state a definitive distinction between what Said calls “metropolitan space” and “colonial space.” In its simplest form, metropolitan space is the space occupied by the colonizers. Examples of this include England, France and the places these people reside in while living in these colonies. Likewise, colonial space is that which is occupied by those who are colonized....   [tags: Passage India]
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1713 words
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Laura Briggs' Reproducing Empire: Race, Sex, Science, and U.S. Imperialism in Puerto Rico - Laura Briggs' Reproducing Empire: Race, Sex, Science, and U.S. Imperialism in Puerto Rico In Reproducing Empire, Laura Briggs provides her readers with a very thorough history of the mainland U.S. and Puerto Rican discourses and its authors surrounding Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans, from Puerto Rico's formation in the mainland elite's "mind" as a model U.S. (not) colony in 1898* to its present status as semi-autonomous U.S. territory. Briggs opens her book by discussing the origins of globalization in U.S....   [tags: Laura Briggs Reproducing Empire Papers] 1740 words
(5 pages)
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Slavery and Reparations - Slavery and Reparations “Slavery, colonialism and neo-colonialism have caused inestimable damage to billions of people throughout the world. They have also formed the basis for the accumulation of immense wealth in the hands of a small elite… The slave trade involved the brutal relocation of tens of millions of people in which families, communities and societies were destroyed and in which millions lost their lives in the most inhumane conditions. At the same time, slavery was a fundamental element of the strengthening of mercantile trade and the rapid accumulation of capital that formed the basis for the emergence of the capitalist system as we know it today....   [tags: History Historical African Americans Essays] 4382 words
(12.5 pages)
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Economic Networking—Exploring Alternatives for Promoting Sustainable Development in Africa - Economic Networking—Exploring Alternatives for Promoting Sustainable Development in Africa INTRODUCTION The history of European aid intervention in the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) states has traditionally acted to reinforce the hierarchical distinction between the “developed” and the “developing” world. The series of Lome Conventions which granted preferential trade agreements between these groups of countries have proved ineffective in encouraging economic sustainability in the ACP states, and although the ACP includes most of the Least Developed Countries (LLDCs) in the world, the agreements have been criticized as being unfair in the global context....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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2911 words
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Caribbean History - Caribbean History I. A Note on Historical Methodology: The conventional method of studying history consists of a chronological process. For example, the history of the ‘New World,’ or in particular the history of the Caribbean seems to originate in 1492, the year Columbus mistakenly landed upon Hispanola. Not long after the discovery of the New World, the age of European colonialism in the Americas emerges. This condensed version of the first several decades of European influence in the New World are the common historical accounts rendered about early Caribbean history....   [tags: Socio-Cultural Areas Culture Islands Essays] 1279 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Heathen Inside: "Darkness," Abjection, and the Colonial Discourse - The Heathen Inside: "Darkness," Abjection, and the Colonial Discourse In Romanticism and Colonialism, Tim Fulford and Peter J. Kitson argue that few scholars explicate the relationship between Romantic texts, British colonialism, and imperialism. Fulford and Kitson point out that the "Romantic period is a watershed in colonial history," marking the inception of a British empire based on the political philosophy of the "white man's burden" (3). By reading Romantic texts in the historical and political context of colonialism and imperialism, Fulford and Kitson hope to return Romantic texts "to the context of material, colonial processes contemporaneous with their imagined versions of colonized people and places" (9)....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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2981 words
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Cuban Communism - “Japan’s imperial experience was different from that of the West in Asia and Africa in several fundamental ways.” (Bruce Cummings) Is it a valid categorisation of Japanese rule in Korea. Identify some of the main differences between Japanese colonialism and Western colonialism. Illustrate your answer with examples. Imperialism has existed for many years and has displayed many differing forms. It is a naturally occurring event that has a vast and complex history. Major world powers have been striving to expand their relative power and at the same time provide for their people....   [tags: essays research papers] 2894 words
(8.3 pages)
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Culture and Values Terms - High and Popular Culture High culture is a term referring to the "best of breed" (from some elitist viewpoints) cultural products. What falls in this category is defined by the most powerful sections of society, i.e. its social, political, economic and intellectual elite. The opposite of high cultural art forms, such as the opera, historic art, classical music, traditional theatre or literature; popular culture includes many forms of cultural communication including newspapers, television, advertising, comics, pop music, radio, cheap novels, movies, jazz, etc....   [tags: essays research papers] 1632 words
(4.7 pages)
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It Wasn’t War it Was Genocide in Rwanda - It Wasn’t War it Was Genocide in Rwanda Never ending battles have occurred over the past sixty years in Rwanda due to their atrocious economy. It has been the Tutsi and the Hutu, two out of the three ethnic groups in Rwanda, that have been battling for the government spot. As the years went on, the fighting kept getting more brutal. This brutality ended up being an all out massacre in Rwanda from the Hutu. It has been argued whether if the killings were an act of genocide or an act of war. But what are exactly genocide and war, and which one relates to the conflict in Rwanda....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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2818 words
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Compare the Presentation of Foreigners Abroad in Indian Ink and Room with a View - Indian Ink and A Room with a View are both set in different eras. A Room with a View is set in the Edwardian era when, like the central character in the book, people were beginning to challenge Victorian attitudes about emotion and sexuality and old ideas about class and religion. It was published in 1908 and was Forster's third novel. Forster's characters, like Forster himself lived in the time of the British Empires pinnacle. The novel is about a young woman, Lucy Honeychurch, whose love for a British socialist and experiences in Florence cause her to question the values that society has imposed on her....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 2085 words
(6 pages)
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Nyasha's Struggle in Nervous Conditions - Nyasha's Struggle in Nervous Conditions The significance of Nyasha in "Nervous Conditions" involves her apparent rebellious nature and her reluctance to accept the norm. Her unwillingness to conform to the ideals of a sexist society perpetuates her into a constant struggle against the patriarchal system. She may have lost the fight in the end but it's not to no avail because her example goes on to encourage Tambu to carry on in her wake. Nyasha is important because she is a shinning example of the effects of colonialism on the African population, she influences Tambu's own rebellious nature, and she's one of the few that rebel against the patriarchal system....   [tags: Papers] 734 words
(2.1 pages)
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Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart - Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart The last chapter of Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" concludes with the sentence: "He had already chosen the title of the book, after much thought: The Pacification of the Primitive Tribes of the Lower Niger." This refers to the District Commissioner's chosen title for a book he has written that would have the African people, the Igbo tribe specifically, as the main subject. From the title itself, one can say that the writer has an unfavorable bias against his subject....   [tags: Chinua Achebe Things Fall Apart] 1060 words
(3 pages)
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Commentary of Rabindranath Tagore's Africa - ... In establishing this contrast, he founds a formidable setting that readers come to admire, so that when it is later distorted, his readers experience a slice of the discomfort that Africa undergoes. Tagore’s employment of magical diction imparts his conception of nature’s enigmatic charm to readers, allowing them to value such unfathomable beauty amidst a growing sense of pathos of the continent's fall. The ‘invisible magic’ of Nature that ‘worked spells’ portrays the nature of Africa as enchanting and mysterious....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1708 words
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Environmental Issues Q&A - ... Macalester College, accessd 9-07-2010, <http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Gend/GendWarr.htm>.   Question 4 Explain the relevance of the term ‘neo-colonialism’ to an understanding of the environmental relationship between North and South. Neo-Colonialism was a term that was frequently used after World War 2, which described how the Core began to use economic powers, in forms of lending money to control former colonies, thus creating political, economic and social dependencies. In few cases the relationship between the North and South is rarely equal (Maliha 2008)....   [tags: Environment]
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2010 words
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The State of Exception and Collective Shame in Coetzee: An Allegorical Reading of Waiting for the Barbarians - ... This emergency first “leads to exceptional practices of torture. . . deployed as if normal under the circumstances and later to those same practices acting upon and displacing the rule of ordinary law” (Crocker 4). The power exercised by the Colonel and his empire are thus paralleled to the “emergency powers” granted to the executive branch of the U.S. Government as a protector of national security against the “terrorists,” or “barbarians.” Many critics of the “war on terror” also point to a temporary suspension of habeas corpus, which is analogous to the role of torture in Waiting for the Barbarians....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2009 words
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Bhabha's Contribution to Postcolonial Theory - ... London : Fontana , 1986. -- Gwendolen. London : Falmingo, 1989. -- Kehinde. London : Hieneman Educational Publishers, 1994. Enugu, A.C. Gender Voices and Choices: Redefining Women in Contemporary African Fiction. Nigeria : Fourth Dimension Publishing, 1995. Fafunwa, A. Babs. History of Education in Nigeria. London: George, Allen & Unwin, 1974. Fishburn, Katherine. Reading Buchi Emecheta: Cross-Cultural Conversations. Westport : Greenwood press, 1995. Gandhi. Leela. Postcolonial Theory: A Critical Introduction....   [tags: Sociology ]
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Life in Trinidad and Tobago - ... The program provided support in education. Aid also sent to the countries of Guyana and Belize under the conditions of Commonwealth Technical Assistance Program that was established in 1958. Also, in the years of 1964-65, an allocation of aid was also granted to Jamaica and Trinidad. In the same year the aid program debut development loans. Previously all aid was out-right grants. The Canadian aid was focused on transportation, education and water development and to a limited extent in agriculture development in smaller territories....   [tags: Country Analysis ]
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Postcolonial Indian Literature in English: Narayan, Jhabvala, Rushdie - Postcolonial Indian Literature in English: Narayan, Jhabvala, Rushdie Indian literature in English which is accessible to us in the West, still has its roots in colonial literature and the tensions between East and West. A European naturalism is often present; a concern to posit India as an arena within which Western readers can identify realities is inherent within much of this writing. The following are three examples of the progression of post-Independence literature. Twenty years after Independence, R.K.Narayan was still tackling issues of colonialism....   [tags: Essays Papers] 426 words
(1.2 pages)
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things fall apart - Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is a story that describes the effects of a new Christian religion in a tribal village of Africa, called Umuofia. The novel is set during the late 1800s to early 1900s when the British were expanding their influence in Africa, economically, culturally, religiously, and politically. The book shows the colonization of Umuofia by the British and the negative and violent changes this brought about in the lives of the tribe members. Along with colonization was the arrival of the missionaries whose main aim was to spread the message of Christianity and to convert people to their religion....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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467 words
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Reclaiming the Voice in So Long a Letter - Reclaiming the Voice in Bâ's So Long a Letter            Peter Barry identifies as one of the major aims of Postcolonial criticism the rejection of "the claims to universalism made on behalf of canonical Western literature" and more specifically "to show its limitations of outlook, especially its general inability to empathize across boundaries of cultural and ethnic difference" (198). Although Bâ's intentions are not primarily anti-colonial, her novel So Long a Letter exemplifies how African literature provides a different perspective of their culture, and despite not fitting the model of the English canon, is valuable and significant on its own terms....   [tags: So Long a Letter Essays]
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Revealing the Heart of Darkness in Apocalypse Now - Revealing the Heart of Darkness in Apocalypse Now Often a novel filmed as a movie departs from the original story, sometimes for better, sometimes for worse.  However, many great works of literature have inspired movies, and served as the basis for a great film, even though the film may approach the literature in a different way. Such is the case with Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now, which was inspired by Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness.  Coppola and the screenwriter, John Mileus, took a story written nearly eighty years earlier and used its basic theme of the inner darkness of man and the idea of the journey up a river into the unknown to tell a story about one of the darkest, most confusing chapters of American history: the Vietnam War.  Coppola's alterations to Heart of Darkness serve to exemplify his overall point, namely, that the United States' involvement in Vietnam was itself a descent into the "heart of darkness".  Coppola was able to make a movie with such a theme for an American audience that was still dealing with Vietnam.  The movie came out five years after the last troops finally left Vietnam, and the American public was still asking itself what had been accomplished and why we had been involved, while the troops who had served there were haunted by memories of the horrors they had seen, and were left wondering what it had all been worth as well.  Coppola found a story in Heart of Darkness that dealt with the same issues of darkness and confusion, and he applied them to Vietnam to accomplish the task of demonstrating the darkness that was the Vietnam War.  Coppola uses the basic plot structure and theme of Heart of Darkness to convey a message that America was wrong in the Vietnam War, and he comes to the disturbing conclusion that the only way to win a war is to be as ruthless as Kurtz, a message which differs from Conrad's Kurtz but still draws from the theme of the heart of darkness....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast]
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2194 words
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An Analysis of Shakespeare's The Tempest - An Analysis of Shakespeare's The Tempest There are many ways of interpreting Shakespeare's The Tempest. A Post-Colonialist critic, such as Stephen Greenblatt, will look at the influence of historical and political implications of colonialism on the text. Along these lines, a Reader Response critic, such as Paul Yachnin, will look specifically at Shakespeare's audience and their concerns at the time in which the play was written. Very different from these approaches, a Psychological critic, such as Bernard Paris, will completely ignore what was in the author's and audience's minds, and look at the psyche of the main character in the play....   [tags: Tempest Essays]
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Ngugi wa Thiong’o's Personal and Political Beliefs Through A Grain of Wheat - Ngugi wa Thiong’o's Personal and Political Beliefs Through A Grain of Wheat Ngugi wa Thiong’o is a Kenyan born writer of Gikuyu descent, born in 1938 in Limuru. He attended Alliance High School in Kenya, Makere University in Uganda, and Leeds University in England. In 1992 Ngugi was honored with the Paul Robeson Award for Artistic Excellence, Political Conscience, and Integrity. He received the Gwendolyn Brooks Center Contributors’ Award for Significant Contribution to the Black Literary Arts in 1994....   [tags: Ngugi wa Thiong Grain Wheat Essays]
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A post-colonial canonical and cultural revision of Conan Doyle's Holmes narratives - A post-colonial canonical and cultural revision of Conan Doyle's Holmes narratives Redefining the British literary canon as imperial construct and influence 'A canon,' Ashcroft, Griffiths and Tiffiin argue, 'is not a body of texts per se, but rather a set of reading practices....' (189). They define 'reading practices' as 'the enactment of innumerable individual and community assumptions, for example about genre, about literature, and even about writing....' (189). The purpose of the following discussion is to investigate the link between the British literary canon and its attendant culture....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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The Historical and Colonial Context of Brian Friel’s Translations - The Historical and Colonial Context of Brian Friel’s Translations Regarded by many as Brian Friel’s theatrical masterpiece, Seamus Deane described Translations as “a sequence of events in history which are transformed by his writing into a parable of events in the present day” (Introduction 22). The play was first produced in Derry in 1980. It was the first production by Field Day, a cultural arts group founded by Friel and the actor Stephen Rea, and associated with Deane, Seamus Heaney and Tom Paulin....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1311 words
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Why Poor Countries Are Poor - Why Poor Countries Are Poor The question of why poor countries are poor may seem simple and one dimensional at first glance. However, the answer to this question is actually quite intricate, as many interweaving aspects must be observed. Although it is impossible to explain why many countries remain in poverty within just a few pages, I will attempt to touch upon some of the broader factors. A poor country or a low-income economy is defined as a country with a Gross National Product per capita of $765 dollars or less....   [tags: Economics Politics Political]
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The Change of Messages in Dancehall - THE CHANGE OF MESSAGES IN DANCEHALL Reggae is a form of music that is too broad to be grouped into one particular category. The reggae genre is composed of such distinct forms as roots, dub, and most recently dancehall. Similarly, the message contained within reggae music has changed since the days when the music reflected an adherence to Haile Selassie and the Rastafarian faith. Since the beginnings of reggae in the 1960s reggae has evolved tremendously into the high-bass dancehall form most prevalent today....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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How would I write a Native American History textbook? - How would I write a Native American History textbook. Why does one write a history in a book. Most historians argue that the events and beliefs of the past constitute who we are today: to understand current structures of society and government, we must devote ourselves to understanding the struggles, failures and triumphs of our forefathers. Yet as events and beliefs are recorded and transmitted, the interpretative bias of historians come through the pages of text-books. Interpreting the interpretations of historians is the vital responsibility of readers to develop critical awareness of bias, stereotpye and discrimination....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1105 words
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Failure of IMF and World Bank Policies in Sub-Saharan Africa - Failure of IMF and World Bank Policies in Sub-Saharan Africa Over the last several hundred years, Africa has been deprived of the peace that it so desperately needs. For over 400 years, Africa was subjected to the harsh trans-Atlantic slave trade. Europeans and Americans brutally uprooted millions of Africans and shipped them away. Torn away from their homes, Africans were inhumanely exploited for their labor. The slave trade had a devastating effect not only on those involved, but also on future generations to come....   [tags: Africa World Bank Essays]
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4503 words
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Fly Away Peter and Heart of Darkness - Fly Away Peter and Heart of Darkness Fly Away Peter, written by David Malouf, is set in 1914-1915 during the period of World War One. The story of the main character, Jim, begins in his home in rural Queensland before embarking on a journey in France to fight in the war. Heart of Darkness, written by Joseph Conrad, is set in a similar period of time. The main character Marlow’s journey is to the Congo, which had recently become a part of the Belgium Empire. Both characters undertake a physical, intellectual and spiritual journey....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1196 words
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A Passage to India:An Examination of the Work in a Historical Context - A Passage to India by Edward Morgan Forster is truly one of the great books of it’s time. Written in an era when the world was more romantic, yet substantially less civil to the unwestern world than it is today; E. M. Forster opened the eyes of his fellow countrymen and the world by showing them the truth about British Colonialism. The novel aids greatly in the ability to interpret events of the time as well as understand the differences between the social discourse of then and now. To fully understand A Passage to India and its cultural and historical significance one must first understand the world in which it was written, and the man who wrote it....   [tags: essays research papers] 1058 words
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The Seeds - The seeds of the Vietnam War were sown two decades prior to the conflict. Following the Second World War the United States adopted two foreign policies, which seemed to coexist peacefully for a time. The policies: anti-colonialism (policy against colonization of small nations) and anti-communism. Little did the United States know that the coexistence of these two policies would soon become a great paradox. Indochina had been a colony of France since the middle of the nineteenth century, within its parameter Indochina contained three nations: Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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2649 words
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The Theme of Darkness in Conrad's Heart of Darkness - The Theme of Darkness in Conrad's Heart of Darkness Works Cited Not Included It has been said that although Conrad may not have been 'the greatest novelist, he was certainly the greatest artist every to write a novel';. I feel that this is an apt description of Conrad's writing style in Heart of Darkness (1902), as he paints many verbal pictures by using expressive words and many figurative descriptions of places and people. An extensive use of words relating to colour, is evident throughout the novella....   [tags: Heart Darkness Joseph Conrad Essays] 1326 words
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Women and Islam - Women in Islam      Religious institution has a profound impact on any and every society. Social norms, mores, and expectations are mostly defined by our belief systems, even if we ourselves don’t practice a religion. Government too is always based on common agreement upon what is right and wrong, and who is to rule. A society can experience violent opposition and revolutions because of radical religious groups. There’s no doubt about it. In any society, small or large, primitive or modern, religious institution plays a leading role....   [tags: Islamic Females Islam Essays]
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The Collapse of Somalia and Economic Considerations - The Collapse of Somalia and Economic Considerations By African standards, Somalia is a homogenous state made up of a single ethnicity, religion and culture. This led to a relatively peaceful history until Somalia was colonized by the British, French, and Italians in the 19th century. However, Somalia’s single ethnicity is broken into different clans, and sub-clans and this region’s lack of natural resources led to a fracturing of society, violence, and eventually civil war at the end of the 20th century....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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4764 words
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Economy of Brazil - Economy of Brazil Defining Economy I am researching the economy of Brazil. The definition of economy: The Management of the income, expenditures, etc of a household, business, community, or government. Careful management of wealth, resources, etc; avoidance of waste by careful planning use; thrift or thrifty use. (1) The system or range of economic activity in a country, region, or community. (2) Characteristics of Brazil The country of Brazil official name is Federative Republic of Brazil, the term for citizens is Brazilian, and its capital is Brasilia....   [tags: Papers] 1157 words
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State Mass Killings in Indonesia 1965 to 1966 - State Mass Killings in Indonesia 1965 to 1966 In order to develop a general framework with which to understand collective political violence, I examine state mass killings in Indonesia 1965-66. While acknowledging the importance of historical/cultural factors, I identify elements within the sociopolitical sphere that influence actors of collective political violence at national, local, and event- specific levels. Elements discussed are elite interests, justification for violence, formal organizations, and mobilization factors....   [tags: Papers] 3119 words
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United States Policy toward Southeast Asia - United States Policy toward Southeast Asia In 1943, Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed a trusteeship principle, in which the subjugated nations of Asia would prepare themselves for self-government, under the supervision of the imperial nations. FDR had ‘genuine humanitarian principles’[1] and was aware of the conditions under which colonial people sometimes lived. He also realised that the colonial system was detrimental to US interests. According to Robert McMahon, FDR altered his thinking in late 1944....   [tags: Papers] 3629 words
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Ethics of Affirmative Action - Affirmative Action: Staying on the Road to Equality “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” (Declaration of Independence, 1776). Who would imagine that in a country under the blanket such a brilliant, ethical and proud statement of equality, there could be so much dissention about equality. Our nation has interpreted this statement differently since it was written, and still, more than two hundred years later, we are on the road to a truly equal society....   [tags: Ethics Morals]
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Code-switching: An Essential Skill For Bilinguals - ... The other group whom she speaks “standard English” to is white people. The second reason is colonialism. Chinua Achebe, the well-known African writer, experiences a mixed culture with native Africa and British colonialism. From “the song of ourselves”, Chinua Achebe mentioned that he did not see himself as an African to begin with. He went through his first level of schooling thinking he was aside with the white men against what they called the "savages". He soon found that he was not the white person in the hair-raising adventures, but a part of the group of people who these white men captured....   [tags: Language] 708 words
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The Tourism Industry in the Carribean - ... The tourism industry in the Caribbean is not operated in a way that enables the Caribbean people to have control over their own economy. Pattullo’s report explains how most of the control of the economy and commerce in the Caribbean is in the large corporations that operate there but are located in other foreign countries. Comparing to Farrell’s account, she explains this by showing how the tourism industry is run and operated there. Farrell justifies reference to colonialism in the Caribbean....   [tags: Tourism]
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An Icon of American Expansionism - ... If the image is to be understood as what author Laura Wexler describes as “a kind of aesthetic and emotional contemplation... [to] an emergent middle-class readership” regarding domestic social, political, and cultural issues, then its objectives are twofold: to accurately encapsulate the national American identity that was produced by a century of regional independence while simultaneously highlighting questions regarding America’s burgeoning imperialist tendencies that were born out of that time period....   [tags: American History] 1091 words
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Postcolonialism - ... This dichotomy is extremely postcolonial: it demonstrates Fanon’s double consciousness, as well as Bhabha’s theory of the in-between. Fanon’s double consciousness was derived from W.E.B. DuBoi’s analysis of racism in the early twentieth century. It “underlines the fact that colonialism made its impact on bodies and minds, as well as on material conditions” (Waugh 346). Although they are not fully American, colonization denies the colonized the right to fully embrace their ethnicity. The assimilation they are thrown into forces many facets of their identity to form....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1313 words
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Roosevelt's Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine - ... Here, the issue of textuality is raised; while politically, the protection of American countries by the United States suggests a benevolent intention, the idea that America had indirect authority over its neighbors indicates an imperialistic social context that Professor X ignores. Monroe explains that, “only when our rights are invaded or seriously menaced [do] we resent injuries or make preparation for our defense,” and if this holds true, then the basic foreign policy decisions stipulated throughout the Doctrine suggest that maintaining and preserving the Americas from colonialism was an inherent American political “right.” Similarly, if America held this power to be an inherent right, then the inhabitants of these potentially colonized nations received little agency within this international equation....   [tags: Global Politics] 1104 words
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Metafiction and JM Coetzee's Foe - Metafiction and JM Coetzee's Foe   Is writing not a fine thing, Friday. Are you not filled with joy to know that you will live forever, after a manner. (Susan Barton, Foe, 58) Of the many literary conventions used to describe JM Coetzee's Foe, one of the more commonly written about is metafiction. Since about 1970, the term metafiction has been used widely to discuss works of post-modern fiction and has been the source of heated debate on whether its employ marks the death or the rebirth of the novel....   [tags: Foe]
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Understanding Indigenism: Building A Different Future for Us All - Understanding Indigenism: Building A Different Future for Us All “Defining one’s ‘culture’ is a life long process,” according to Indian rights activist Norman DesCampe of the Grand Portage Chippewa Tribe. “You have to live it.” Today, the life long process of understanding indigenous cultures is limited by terms of “cultural survival.” The ability of future generations to define themselves as Inuit or Kayapo is threatened as their natural environments and social integrity is hurt by government negligence: indigenous cultures must be protected under a political structure that allows the people to live as they choose to live, outside of the transformative power of established nation-states, and the assumptions of these powers....   [tags: Essays Papers] 549 words
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Visual Codes and Conventions in the Painting: George Robinson Welcomes Natives to Wybalenna - Visual texts can be seen to be an attempt by their creators to represent particular ideologies to their viewers. It is the viewer's attitudes and values however, that determine the contemporary meaning of the image. The painting George Robinson welcomes Natives to Wybalenna, is a Colonial document portraying the Christianizing of indigenous people on Flinders Island. Visual codes and conventions employed in the image, such as positioning and framing depict the entwined values of white, patriarchal and Christian ideologies of the 19th Century....   [tags: Art Christian Religion] 568 words
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Colonial Discourse in Jane Eyre - Colonial Discourse in Jane Eyre The plot of Jane Eyre is well known and it is not my intention to outline it here. Instead I want to draw attention to a number of key points which relate to the theme of colonies and colonialism. The figure of the first Mrs Rochester, the insane and promiscuous Creole who stands in the way of Rochester's marriage to the modest Jane is the most obvious example of Bronte's use of the colonies to provide the material for her work, but there are other moments of interaction throughout the novel....   [tags: Essays Papers] 373 words
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Amistad - Amistad Throughout the study of world history, the ideology of &#8220;divide and conquer'; is studied and glorified as the most effective strategy for colonialism. The institution of slavery and the transporting of Africans across the ocean to serve as slaves in the &#8220;New World'; depict the most blatant use of coerced division in the Europeans efforts to completely enfeeble African slaves. The middle passage portrays the Europeans efforts to divide African cultures by separating the slaves so that they were amongst those that spoke different languages and therefore could not communicate with them....   [tags: Film Review, Movie] 286 words
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The Tempest Is A Play About The Power And Dangers Of Creativity - The Tempest is a play about the power and dangers of creativity. Discuss. "From beginning to end the play-write gives prominence to the problems of dominion, freedom, political failure and of repetition." Like Russ Mc Donald I also believe that Shakespeare devoted his last comedy largely to the exploration of the shapes and effects that possession and the search for power can have on persons. The Tempest's central character, Prospero, is also crucial to this interpretation. His unique magical gifts give him undefeatable power to wreak vengeance on his enemies....   [tags: essays research papers] 377 words
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Images of Africa in Heart of Darkness and Things Fall Apart - Images of Africa in Heart of Darkness and Things Fall Apart         Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness portrays an image of Africa that is dark and inhuman.  Not only does he describe the actual, physical continent of Africa as "so hopeless and so dark, so impenetrable to human thought, so pitiless to human weakness" (Conrad 94), as though the continent could neither breed nor support any true human life, but he also manages to depict Africans as though they are not worthy of the respect commonly due to the white man.  At one point the main character, Marlow, describes one of the paths he follows: "Can't say I saw any road or any upkeep, unless the body of a middle-aged negro, with a bullet-hole in the forehead, upon which I absolutely stumbled three miles farther on, may be considered as a permanent improvement" (48).  Conrad's description of Africa and Africans served to misinform the Western world, and went uncontested for many years....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Heart of Darkness - A Reform Piece or Racist Trash? - Heart of Darkness - Reform Piece or Racist Trash.        In 1890, Joseph Conrad spent four months as a steamship captain in the Congo. Like his character Marlow, Conrad became both physically ill and greatly disturbed as a result of his experiences. The Congo haunted Conrad, and despite the fact that he spent relatively little of his time there, he felt compelled to write about his experiences years later.1   Indeed, the Congo had a profound influence on Conrad. While there he met Roger Casement who was to become a life long friend and ally in the campaign against Leopold II....   [tags: HOD Joseph Conrad Racism Prejudice]
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The Characters, Setting, and Symbols of Heart of Darkness - The Characters, Setting, and Symbols of Heart of Darkness       Beyond the shield of civilization and into the depths of a primitive, untamed frontier lies the true face of the human soul. It is in the midst of this savagery and unrelenting danger that mankind confronts the brooding nature of his inner self.  Joseph Conrad’s novel, Heart of Darkness, is the story of one man's insight into life as he embarks on a voyage to the edges of the world. Here, he meets the bitter, yet enlightening forces that eventually shape his outlook on life and his own individuality....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
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Importance of Setting in Shakespeare's The Tempest - Importance of Setting in The Tempest   The island of magic and mystery that Shakespeare creates in The Tempest is an extraordinary symbol of both the political and social realities of his contemporary society, and of the potential for a reformed New World. Shakespeare’s island is a creation which allows the juxtaposition of real and idealised worlds, and shows his audience both what they and what they ought to be. The seventeenth century was a time of ideological upheaval in Europe, with Medieval ideas of a hierarchical and ordered society being challenged by Renaissance thinkers....   [tags: Tempest essays]
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Jourody Journey of Homer's Odyssey, Joyce's Ulysses and Walcott's Omeros - The Journey of Homer's Odyssey, Joyce's Ulysses and Walcott's Omeros      This essay explores how the theme of the journey, pervasive in Homer's Odyssey, find expression in James Joyce's Ulysses (1922) and Derrick Walcott's Omeros (1990), epics written in very different historical periods.  Common to all three epics is a plot structure that involves a protagonist who longs for home but who must first endure a life-altering change before he returns. The theme of the "journey" provokes an image of both a natural and spiritual quest occurring simultaneously, both significantly viable because each passage contributes equally to the manifestation of the maturing male identity....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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The Death of Indian Culture Exposed in The Jewel In the Crown - The Death of Indian Culture Exposed in The Jewel In the Crown      The Jewel in the Crown, by Paul Scott, is a postcolonial novel about the realism of the interracial love affair between Daphne Manners and Hari Kumar, the subsequent rape of Daphne Manners, and the after effects on British and Indian relations. At a time when British and Indian affairs were strained, at best, the rape of Miss Manners is significantly metaphoric of the British rape of Indian land and culture. British colonial sentiment became a primary influence in India, when the revolt of 1857 led to the reorganization of British influence....   [tags: Jewel in the Crown Essays]
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Characteristics of Modernism in Jewel in the Crown and Heart of Darkness - Characteristics of Modernism in Jewel in the Crown and Heart of Darkness         A Modern novel, Jewel in the Crown, by Paul Scott, depicts the latter stages of imperialism's erosion and explores it through the lives of individuals and their relationships as symbolic of larger societal conflicts and political events.  Jewel was written well into the 20th Century and employs thematic concepts and literary forms characteristic of Modernism, as well as being significant in its literary-historical context of the decline of British Imperialism/post- colonialism in India....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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The Death of Identity in DeLillo's White Noise - The Death of Identity in DeLillo's White Noise In addition to addressing the premonitory electricity of death, the title of Don DeLillo's White Noise alludes to another, subtler, sort of white noise - the muted death of suburban white identity. College-on-the-Hill is not only an elite academic promontory, but also a bastion for white flight in which Jack Gladney's family has taken refuge. Instead of John Winthrop's clear City-on-a-Hill morality, DeLillo presents us with J.A.K. Gladney's muddled postmodern inheritance of J.F.K.'s civil rights legacy....   [tags: White Noise Essays Papers]
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The Marxist Formula in Emecheta's The Joys of Motherhood - The Marxist Formula in Emecheta's The Joys of Motherhood "Marx states that we are truly free only when '[people] place themselves in a position to control their own historical destiny'"(Slaughter 25). Britain's imperial colonization of Africa triggered vast change within the tribal civilizations thriving on the continent prior to European occupation. For the Africans, these changes altered every level of their culture: language, religion, as well as ancient tribal customs. But one of the most devastating aspects of the British colonization in Africa was the European economic system: capitalism....   [tags: Emecheta Joys of Motherhood Essays]
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The Subject of Race in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness - The Subject of Race in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness In 1899 Joseph Conrad published a short work of fiction called Heart of Darkness. This novella is often read, discussed, criticized in literature programs throughout the world. It is a work that allows us to tackle a variety of topics, and is therefore responded to in a variety of ways. The work itself as one critic puts it “might most usefully be considered hyper-canonized” (Padmini “Why” 104). The work is taught beyond the realm of a normal work in the literature program....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
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Analysis of America's Longest War: The United States in Vietnam - Analysis of America's Longest War: The United States in Vietnam The reports in this novel are prefaced with a quote by Robert Shaplen, which sums up the feelings of those Americans involved in the Vietnam conflict. He states, "Vietnam, Vietnam . . .. There are no sure answers." In this novel, the author gives a detailed historical account of the happenings in Vietnam between 1950 and 1975. He successfully reports the confusing nature, proximity to the present and the emotions that still surround the conflict in Vietnam....   [tags: American America History] 1839 words
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European Values, Globalization, and Domination - European Values, Globalization, and Domination The major lasting impact of human mobility across borders and across cultures is the rise of the western domination and exploitation of cultures; and which now manifests itself globalization. In this essay I seek to explain the cultural values which made western domination possible and the impact this culture, once globalized had on ecosystems. The supremacy was the product of cultural forces which were favorable to European domination, and on the part of conquered peoples, their biological susceptibility to European diseases....   [tags: Politics Political Essays]
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Post Colonial Interpretations of Shakespeare’s The Tempest - Post Colonial Interpretations of Shakespeare’s The Tempest “…do we really expect, amidst this ruin and undoing of our life, that any is yet left a free and uncorrupted judge of great things and things which reads to eternity; and that we are not downright bribed by our desire to better ourselves?” – Longinus Since the seventeenth century many interpretations and criticisms of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest have been recorded. Yet, since the play is widely symbolical and allegorical Shakespeare’s actual intentions behind the creation of the play can never be revealed....   [tags: Shakespeare Tempest]
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Religion, Barnard College Women, War, and Evangelical Biblical Interpretation after 9.11 - Religion, Barnard College Women, War, and Evangelical Biblical Interpretation after 9.11 One of the most disturbing things about living in New York City since 9.11 has been the way in which the U.S. has been able to wage war on Afghanistan and now maybe Iraq, with very little public outcry. I’d like to suggest that behind the apathy, certain traditions of Christian biblical interpretation may be at work, traditions that feature feminine figures in very particular ways. These are interpretive traditions around salvation history, and apocalypse....   [tags: September 11 Terrorism Essays]
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The Fantasy of Out of Africa vs. the Reality of Ngugi's A Grain of Wheat - The Fantasy of Out of Africa vs. the Reality of Ngugi's A Grain of Wheat Both the film and the book versions of Out of Africa portray life in Africa as being a haven for European colonists. In these works, Africa was a beautiful land to move to where the Europeans could live like “royalty” in a sense. Their money went a lot further, and they could have African servants do all the work and chores for them. These African peoples adored the white settlers, and would peacefully work for them for very low wages....   [tags: Compare Contrast Africa Grain Wheat Essays]
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The Development of Racism - The Development of Racism Slavery's twin legacies to the present are the social and economic inferiority it conferred upon blacks and the cultural racism it instilled in whites. Both continue to haunt our society. Therefore, treating slavery's enduring legacy is necessarily controversial. Unlike slavery, racism is not over yet. (Loewen 143) Racism can be defined as "any set of beliefs, which classifies humanity into distinct collectives, defined in terms of natural and/or cultural attributes, and ranks these attributes in a hierarchy of superiority and inferiority" (Blum 5)....   [tags: Slavery Racist Equality Segregation Essays]
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Globalization as a Force of Progress, not Perfection - Globalization as a Force of Progress, not Perfection Advances in technology and the expansion of trade have, without a doubt, improved the standard of living dramatically for peoples around the world. Globalization brings respect for law and human rights and the democratization of politics, education, and finance to developing societies, but is usually slow in doing so. It is no easy transition or permanent solution to conflict, as some overly zealous proponents would argue. In The Great Illusion, Norman Angell sees globalization as a force which results from and feeds back into the progressive change of human behavior from using physical force toward using rational, peaceful methods in order to achieve economic security and prosperity....   [tags: World Technology Essays] 2582 words
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The Modern Day Gikuyun Farmer - The Modern Day Gikuyun Farmer The following are excerpts from a research project undertaken by Ramya Bavikatte on her Washington Semester at American University. Ramya traveled with her class to Kenya, where she learned more about the issues of small holder agriculture and the Gikuyun farmer. The purpose of this research project is to study the economic and social implications of smallholder agriculture in Kenya. The shift of smallholders from subsistence farming to cash crop farming created significant changes in the standards of living, social security, reproduction, and the sexual division of labor....   [tags: Economics Kenya Agriculture Essays] 1550 words
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Nigeria - Nigeria Modern Nigeria is an archetypal cauldron, enmeshed with a variety of cultural groups and traditions, nevertheless united by the prospect of forging a unique independent national identity. Hausa, Fulbe, Yoruba and Igbo are among the largest of those, in the forty -three years since the end of colonial occupation, struggling to maintain their linguistic and cultural affiliations while simultaneously converging t o create a syncretic sense of Nigerianness. Subsequently, as one means of understanding art, in essence, is as a celebration of identity, artwork in the post -independence era manifests this struggle; thus, placing artists at the epicenter of cultural iden tification....   [tags: Africa Culture Papers]
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Traditional vs. Modern Society - Traditional vs. Modern Society In today's world, the modern person is educated, independent and aggressive. To be a success, you must put forth your most competitive side and win it all. Nothing less will be permitted. This is the mindset of most business tycoons, stockbrokers and the like. However, on the other side of the globe, third world countries follow a more traditional lifestyle where the outlook on life is a little less malicious. In these countries, the society's idea of success is being part of a large family with prosperous crops and livestock....   [tags: Anthropology Culture Society Essays] 809 words
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Third World Socialism - Third World Socialism Many United States citizens are frightened by the word Socialism. However, the predominant ideology in most Third World countries is socialism. There are many reasons why Third World countries have turned to socialism as their form of government. The main reason the Third World has taken on the concept of socialism is because of the history of feudalism and colonialism that these countries faced for so many years. Socialism was seen as a way to reform the land of many underdeveloped countries....   [tags: Socialism Socialists Governmental Essays] 1539 words
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Effects of British Colonization on Zimbabwe Women - The Effects of British Colonization on Zimbabwe Women The British began their colonization of Zimbabwe in 1890 as part of their project of capitalist expansion and world domination. Colonial expansion was a means of complete control of territories and furthered the expansion of their capitalist political economy. Africa provided the British with slaves, minerals, and raw materials to help them in their capitalist development. To help support capitalist expansion, the British asserted colonial discourse of power and superiority over the colonized....   [tags: Essays Papers] 2624 words
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