Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned 294 essays for "Cicero":
<< Previous  1  2  3  4    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Palatine Hill - The Palatine Hill is central to the rest of Rome’s seven hills. According to Commendare Boni, the Palatine is the most of important of Roman Hills . The Palatine hill towers 40 feet above the Roman Forum and the Circus Maximus. The hill was carved from volcanic sediments which had been eroded over years by the Tiber River. It was originally the location of a Bronze Age settlement as archeological digs have found evidence of human habitation as far back as 10th century BC. The hill also maintains a prominent prominent role in Roman Mythology....   [tags: Roman Republic, Italy]
:: 14 Works Cited
1353 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Philosophy of Ethics - The word “ethics” comes from Greek ethikas meaning character. Today, we use ethics to describe the normative standard of behavior. The history of philosophical ethics has been broken up into five rational methods: Virtue, Traditional, Modern, and Post-Modern Ethics. Within these periods, the philosophy of ethics changed along with the changes being made within society. The first rational method is Virtue Ethics. The major philosophers during this period were materialists such as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Plutarch....   [tags: Philosophy ]
:: 2 Works Cited
2229 words
(6.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Corrupted Imperial Rome - Imperial Rome was an era that had drastic political benefits and deficits. There were a variety of different dynasties that ruled during this period. All of the dynasties ruled after the assassination of Julius Caesar. He was thought to be a conspirator of corruption, but his death was to promote corruption. Among the leaders of Rome, corruption was widespread. Augustus was one of many leaders that supported corruption. Julius Caesar was executed for supporting corruption. Coincidentally, Julius Caesar’s successors were more corrupted than he supposedly was....   [tags: history, politics]
:: 6 Works Cited
1099 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Silence is One of the Greatest Arts of Conversation - ... Yet, her presence as a character remains in the tragedy until the final moments of the play. As a character, Lavinia facilities the perpetuation of the plot; however, she also conveys, in a profound and omniscient manner, the ideological norm surrounding the perception of women in Shakespeare's epoch. Lavinia serves a number of vital functions. Foremost, Lavina, as a character, operates as a device to maintain the momentum of revenge, which flues the tragedy of the protagonist Titus. As well, Shakespeare deliberately bends the development of the character Lavinia in a manner that bolsters his thematic intention of Lavinia as embalm for the state of Rome....   [tags: feminism, communication, language] 645 words
(1.8 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Art of Rhetoric - The desire of rhetoric is always seated in attaining and preserving happiness. Corax of Syracuse (and/or Tisias) is regarded as the first theorist to devise an art of rhetoric as a means to help citizens regain their property seized under the rule of a despot. In this foremost case of Greco-Roman rhetoric, political happiness was sought by means of judicial speeches. The poly-discursive varieties of rhetorical happiness have theoretically expanded in depth and scope from the philosophical, metaphysical, ethical, religious, psychological, and aesthetic....   [tags: Philosophy] 776 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Tough Times in Ireland - ... At the time this pamphlet was written, and for many years afterward, Ireland, highly dependent on England, was a country that was severely poor. Most people born there were Roman Catholics and employed as agricultural laborers or tenant farmers. The ruling class, most of whom were not born there nor did they live there permanently, were Protestants. The government was corrupt and broken; there was no social security system, and starvation was quite common. The Modest Proposal begins by describing this very real poverty of the people in Ireland....   [tags: jonathan swift, national debt, poverty] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Al Capone: One Of The Most Ruthless Men Of All Time - Al Capone: One of the Most Ruthless Men of All Time The ultimate symbol of a gangster rule, is a guy by the name of Al Capone, who dominated the Chicago underworld by committing many crimes: such as illegal gambling, extortion, prostitution, and alcohol distribution during prohibition. Capone’s life of gang activity started at a very young age. He created a multi-million dollar empire of crime in Chicago. He has been referred to as one of the most ruthless men of all time (Stockdale 45). He was a smart businessman, good family man, and a generous person, that lived a life full of murders and other crimes....   [tags: essays research papers] 1924 words
(5.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Marcus Brutus as a Tragic Hero in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar - Marcus Brutus as a Tragic Hero in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar In the play Julius Caesar, the tragedy of the play was directed mainly at one specific character, Marcus Brutus. Brutus was the tragic hero of the play, because of his idealistic and pragmatic qualities. The mindset that Brutus possessed only allowed him to see the world and its people from one point of view. This point of view allowed him to make judgments that assumed only the best of people. This tragic weakness resulted in many errors throughout the play....   [tags: Julius Caesar Essays] 1435 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Analysis of the Poems and Writings by Ralph Waldo Emerson - Analysis of the Poems and Writings by Ralph Waldo Emerson The thoughts and feelings of Ralph Waldo Emerson are uplifting, empowering and can make one feel like their actions matter in a world surrounded by cynicism and despair. His poem "Give all to love" hints briefly at the pain he experienced in his life and his views on love and the human experience. It also demonstrates the style of writing of the transcendentalists. In order to understand Emerson's writing one must first understand the man....   [tags: Papers] 940 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Character of Julius Caesar in William Shakespeare's Play - The Character of Julius Caesar in William Shakespeare's Play In William Shakespeare's ‘Julius Caesar’, honor is displayed as a prominent theme throughout the play. Honor is having great respect for others, regardless of their status in society; and performing great deeds not for personal gain but for the good of others. Marcus Brutus is an example of an honorable man; Caius Cassius, however, is not. When Brutus joined the conspiracy against Caesar, he did it solely for the good of Rome....   [tags: Papers] 543 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Importance of Justice in the Roman Games - The Importance of Justice in the Roman Games On top of justice is being done, we need to look at the functions of the games from the Romans’ point of view. As Thomas Wiedemann says “simply to give way to our emotions is not enough” (RB1, C11, P.101). Wiedemann wanted us to understand the ancient Romans’ beliefs and customs in watching the games. Based from my reading materials, it was not true as the Roman games were more than a medium of public entertainment. In this essay, I will look at the various aspects in which the Roman games were not only about justice, drawing on a variety of sources to support each claim....   [tags: Papers] 732 words
(2.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Conspirators Errored in Murdering Julius Caesar - Julius Caesar (100-44BC) was one of the greatest men produced by ancient Rome and he remains today a famous personality in world history (Barlow 2005). The conspirators were wrong to murder Julius Caesar in three ways. Firstly, they were morally wrong in the removal of Caesar. Secondly, they failed to consider a practical benefit to Rome in the murder of Caesar, resulting in only more problems. Lastly and most importantly, the conspirators were wrong to murder Julius Caesar because they placed their interests before those of Rome....   [tags: Ancient History] 1346 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Lives and Contests of the Gladiators - The Lives and Contests of the Gladiators One form of entertainment in the Roman world was gladiatorial contests. In these, the Roman citizens would go to watch gladiators fight, often to the death. Today, these contests seem brutal and cruel, but at the time it was very popular and widely accepted. The Roman people would quite happily judge over whether a man would live or die. Why were the contests so entertaining that they would cost a man his life over it. There were different types of gladiators and different types of contests to keep the citizens interested....   [tags: Papers] 3264 words
(9.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Brutus versus Cassius in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar - Brutus vs. Cassius In the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare is the story of Julius Caesar’s death that took place 1500 years ago. Caesar, during the time, was escalading in power and was to become emperor. The public was mostly pleased with having Julius Caesar as their emperor but there were people who were outraged and were determined to stop this from happening. The conspirators, as they were called, were a group made up of senators and men of high status in Rome. The two most important men were Marcus Brutus and Cassius....   [tags: essays research papers] 1037 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Theories of Justice in Medieval Philosophy - Theories of Justice in Medieval Philosophy ABSTRACT: I discuss the reception of the classical definitions of "the just" in the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero and Ulpian by the authors of Latin Medieval philosophy. In the twelfth century we can see an emerging differentiation between philosophical and theological discourse, for example in the work of Peter Abelard. In the thirteenth century, in the philosophical writing of Thomas Aquinas, we find the most important philosophical definition of "the just." Aquinas avoids some of the aporias in which the Aristotelian theory on justice was involved....   [tags: German Philosophy Papers] 2943 words
(8.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Ghost Story of the Motel Murders - Prophetic Dreams of the Motel Murders This particular ghost story was told to me by one of the members of my gymnastics troupe. We had become friends over the course of the season, and she was telling me this story in an informal setting in my dorm room on a Friday night. She is twenty years old and grew up in a very conservative Catholic family in New Jersey. Later on, as I attempted to find more people who would have heard a similar story, I ran into another friend who had heard a variation of the same plot....   [tags: Ghost Stories Urban Legends]
:: 1 Works Cited
1435 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Forum Violence in 50 B.C. - Forum Violence in 50 B.C. In modern works on late Republican Rome, the 50's BC are characterised as an age of street gangs, massacres and rampant political violence. Scholars see the battles between Clodius, Milo and Sestius in 57, the electoral and legislative tumults of 55 and the unceasing gang warfare of 53; they read the lurid accounts of Cicero, depicting the sewers clogged with corpses, people feigning death under piles of bodies, and the streets having to be swabbed clean of blood (Pro Sest....   [tags: Papers] 2139 words
(6.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Augustine's Concept of Politics - Augustine's Concept of Politics For Augustine, political life is a necessary evil. Why is it evil and why is it necessary. How then, does his claim influence his political theory. Introduction It is probably prudent to begin by discussing some of the fundamental beliefs of St. Augustine in order to better tackle the question. We must remember that St. Augustine is first and foremost a theologian, and thus his beliefs are firmly rooted in the teachings of Christianity. He accepted the doctrine of the Bible, i.e....   [tags: Politics Theology Augustine Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
2408 words
(6.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Life Of Archimedes - Archimedes, considered on of the greatest minds of the ancient world was born on the island of Sicily in the Greek city of Syracuse in the year 287 B.C.. Syracuse at the time was an independent Greek city-state with a 500-year history. He was the son of Phidias who was a Greek Astronomer and Mathematician. All that we know about Archimedes comes from his existing manuscripts, and from ancient historians such as Plutarch and Cicero among others centuries after his death. Considering the length of time between Archimedes death and the historians' accounts, along with the nonuniformity of their writings, some details of his life have to be subject to question....   [tags: Creek Archimedes Biography] 1361 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The History of the Term Academy Explained in “Academies of Art; Past and Present” by Nikolaus - ... In fifteenth and sixteenth century the term was changed for the groups formed under the influence of various personalities. In seventieth century Cicero’s villa got the name of academy which was another development. In Greece humanists widened the term and used it for a philosophical system. The word ‘academy’ was also used for the learned friends of the well-known poets and artists. In Italy the term was also used for the Platonic philosophy, Aristotelian philosophy and a number of other sets of ideas....   [tags: scholors, readers, greek] 753 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rhetorical Analysis of Speeches in to Kill a Mockingbird, Battle of Falkirk, and Brave Heart - We should study spoken language as it is truly unique and we can see the effect and beauty of spoken language in works of great orators and writers. Spoken language is truly an art, which involves many techniques to perfect and master it. One of the techniques is rhetoric. Rhetoric is the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing. The ancient Greeks first developed public speaking. Under Roman, influence public speaking developed further. This was heavily under the influence of Cicero and Aristotle....   [tags: Essay on Rhetoric] 1267 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Cassius' Manipulation of Brutus, the Noblest Roman of Them All, in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar - Brutus is a good man who is easily turned evil by men filled with abhorrence and jealousy. In the play, Julius Caesar, Brutus is a Roman who is easily manipulated, decisive, and proud. These contradicting traits of Brutus show us why the reader does not want to believe that Brutus is an antagonist in the story. Brutus is shown as being easily manipulated in the play. This trait is shown a few times in the play. At the beginning, Brutus is tricked by Cassius into believing that killing Julius Caesar would be for the better of Rome (1, 2, ll....   [tags: Brutus, Shakespeare, Julius Caesar]
:: 1 Works Cited
687 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Cuba's attempt to redefine medical ethics: can ELAM be considered a success or failure? - "In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods than in giving health to men," this quote by Cicero perfectly describes what the Cuban medical system is attempting to create, a place in which doctors have a desire and drive to not only help people of wealth and stature but also to help those in vulnerable, poor, communities where payment may not be an option. The time in which doctors are compelled by greed and fiscal selfishness needs to end; Cuba is attempting to do this by instilling a new code of ethics to the doctors that graduate from Cuba's Latin American School of Medicine (ELAM)....   [tags: Literary Review]
:: 1 Works Cited
1008 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Machiavelli: On the Growth of Spanish Power and Ferdinand’s Policy of Ethnic Cleansing - Machiavelli: On the Growth of Spanish Power and Ferdinand’s Policy of Ethnic Cleansing Here came Machiavelli, a political thinker of great renown, entering the Hall of the People. Surely, this was a chance to meet and question the man whom some historians call the “Old Nick.” After the publication of The Prince, Machiavelli was so hated that his name became synonymous with the Devil. Indeed, some of us call him a total pervert, a scandalous liar, an advocate of totalitarianism, the angel of death....   [tags: spanish, spain, world history, ethnic]
:: 3 Works Cited
1381 words
(3.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Failure of Rome’s Economy and the Fall of the Roman Empire - The failure of Rome’s economy contributed majorly to the fall of Rome. The Roman Economy during the late Republic and Early Empire was based heavily on Agriculture and Commerce. Agriculture in ancient Rome was not only a necessity, but was idealized among the social elite as a way of life. Cicero had considered agriculture to be the best of all Roman Occupations (Sarudy). There had been a lot of trading between the provinces of the empire, and all regions of the empire were largely economically interdependent....   [tags: ancient history, late republic]
:: 13 Works Cited
987 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Relevance of the Ancients: The Case of Catullus and His Poetry - One kind of poetry existed from very long time ago. At the beginning, in preliterate societies in which period there was no sophisticated writing system, poetry existed in oral form, and people used poetry in oral form to record or to do the storytelling to the next generation (Poetry.org. website. 2005) Therefore, it can be said that there is no clear evidence that shows from when one kind of poetry started to exist. Although it is clear that human in early days had one kind of poetry. The writing system appeared in the sophisticated society, such as Mesopotamian society, Egyptian society, Aegean society as I learned from the class lecture....   [tags: Gilgamesh, Egypt, Catullus]
:: 4 Works Cited
960 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Silent Truth in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee - ... In real life, Truman Capote shared many talents and hobbies with Harper Lee. “Nelle Harper Lee and Truman Capote became friends in the early 1930s as kindergarteners in Monroeville, Alabama” (The Big Read). They enjoyed writing, so Amasa gave the two children an old Underwood typewriter (The Big Read). In the classic, Truman’s name was Charles Baker. They often referred to him as Dill. “Although Capote moved to New York City in the third grade to join his mother and stepfather, he returned to Monroeville most summers, eventually providing the inspiration for Dill in To Kill a Mockingbird” (The Big Read)....   [tags: assumptions, african americans, narrator]
:: 2 Works Cited
1797 words
(5.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The History of the Western World from 500 B.C. to 1500 A.D. - ... Emperors at this time collected classical works on science math, philosophy, and law and stored them in libraries. Secondly, we have the revival of interest in classical studies in the cathedral and monastic schools. This led to growth of critical and skeptical attitude as seen in various philosophies. There was also the revival of the study of the Roman law which gave impetus to the growth of secular interest . There was expansion of intellectual interest which was made possible by the rise of universities....   [tags: person, event, movement, occurence] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Augustine’s Journey to the Truth in The Confessions of St. Augustine - In the Confessions by Saint Augustine, this great philosopher experiences many problems and emotions related to sin and evil. As a boy, he often felt darkness, blindness, and confusion while attempting to find rest in God. Augustine started out in childhood with a restless heart because he had to live in two different worlds. These worlds consisted of his mother’s Christian faith, and the world of everything else. These two worlds confused and disturbed Augustine as a child. Augustine’s father was pagan and his mother was Christian, and they both wanted him to be very successful in the world....   [tags: philosophy, religion, The Confessions of St. Augus]
:: 1 Works Cited
967 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Freedom Of Expression And Action In Libya After The Libyan Uprising - Nowadays, a number of extensive public resistance towards the governments across the Middle East and North Africa often referred to as an Arab Spring has clearly emerged as one of the significant issues in world politics. The whole world watched as countries across the Middle East and North Africa have been conducting protests and demonstrations, depending on the country, to obtain what reforms or to depose their leader. Civilians, along with the social media, made use of strikes, demonstrations, marches, and rallies to persuade government officials....   [tags: Philosophy ]
:: 10 Works Cited
1917 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Just War Theory Described in Living Justice by Thomas Massaro - The just war theory is described by Thomas Massaro in his book Living Justice as the “principle that warfare might be justified under certain conditions” (108). The complexities involved with international relations makes determining a just war very difficult. Even though historically pacifism hasn’t gained much traction within Catholic circles, it currently is gaining popularity with many mainstream Catholics. With so many differing views on military action, one might ask, “What determines a just war....   [tags: international relations, pacifism, catholicism]
:: 6 Works Cited
1398 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics on How to Live One's Life - ... One man is a just man while the other is found to be unjust. The just man decides to not use the rings power, which would allow the man to become invisible and do whatever he wants to do. However, the unjust man decides to use this power, but is caught up in his actions and is not happy ultimately. The just man, since not using the ring, is happy because he is in control of himself and did the virtuous action of not becoming invisible to benefit himself. Plato is clearly arguing for the just man....   [tags: history of early philosphy] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Nothing Can Be Perceived and One Should Not Assent to Anything - ... Aristotle stayed and studied for about twenty years in the academy before establishing his own school. The principle of the academicians possess a conflict attitude and manner which continue to nothing positive. For them the result of conflict is a positive result like Plato. Moreover, they express the truth as a personal belief of one’s perception. Moreover, the truth according to the academicians is called the probable. They contain philosophy from carneades which are closely related to scepticism and sceptics themselves cannot distinguish their position from the academic principle....   [tags: philosophical analysis and critical assessment] 836 words
(2.4 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Plato’s Republic and the Just War Theory Versus Humanitarian Intervention - American involvement in humanitarian intervention is one of the most controversial issues in contemporary US foreign policy. The definition of humanitarian intervention is a military intervention; entering into a country for the purposes of saving lives and protecting citizens from the violation of their human rights. As in all debates, there are always two sides. One side disputes that military force should only be applied when, in the words of former Secretary of Defense Weinberger, ‘a vital national interest is at stake.’ ¹ The opposing side disputes that the US should apply military force to mediate when in the words of former president Clinton, “someone comes after innocent civilians…an...   [tags: plato, republic, war]
:: 1 Works Cited
1033 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Emergence of Diverse Methods of Political Thinking in Ancient Societies - Believing the Gods to be forces that arbitrarily amused themselves by toying with their pawns, humankind, the Greeks found a great deal of detachment. They resigned themselves to their fate and thus concern was replaced by the pursuit of knowledge. The Ionic natural philosophers of the 6th and 7th centuries B.C., along with their descendants, were convinced that a world plan existed that was driven by conception. The pursuit to recognize this plan by great thinkers such as Socrates, Plato and Aristotle thus initiated the origin of Sciences....   [tags: World History] 1461 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Contributions to Western Civilization Made by Ancient Greece and Rome - The ancient Greeks and Romans were perhaps two of the greatest civilizations of the ancient world. These two civilizations thrived in their ancient environments which eventually led to a vast amount of prosperity within these two cultures. It is because of this prosperity that these ancient cultures were able to make a variety of advancements in literature, architecture, art and a variety of other fields. These two civilizations also produced some of the ancient world’s greatest writers, leaders, and philosophers....   [tags: literature, philosophy, democracy]
:: 8 Works Cited
2014 words
(5.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
A Capitalist World in Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman Melville - ... In addition, he seems to understand the guilt he feels by “conducting his own defense” (Dilworth 50). He uses Turkey and Nippers to judge his decision when he told Bartley to assist with the verification of the documents used. He does not seem to be very confident about his decisions anymore, as he now requires other scrivener’s judgments. The narrator tries to find out what’s going on with Bartleby, but he fails. He then changes moods completely and totally accepts Bartleby even when he doesn’t do as he says and answers “I prefer not to.” He accepts him because he does not want him to go to another company and benefit the competition....   [tags: economic systems, christ parable, christians]
:: 3 Works Cited
697 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Meaning of a Word: Justice Is Just This - The are certain words in the English language that are extremely difficult to define therefore to give them meaning, is to enter a fierce debate among thinkers. How does one define a word that is so abstract and whose definition and purpose varies so extensively from nation to nation, language to language, and person to person. One can only hope to grasp the concept of such words, before another person comes up with a slightly more adequate definition than the one currently leading the pack. The reason the definition these words vary as much as they do is simply because their meanings are bottom-line based on opinion....   [tags: Justice, definition, philosophy, ] 1243 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Deception, Corruption and a Collapsing Government in the 1920's - The decade of the 1920’s was full of deception, corruption, and a collapsing government. The United States Congress signed the 18th Amendment, which prohibited the sale of alcohol. The illegal production and distribution of liquor, or bootlegging, became rampant, and the national government did not have the means or determination to enforce this law in every state. This led up to the rise of the Chicago Outfit and how they brought a new type business into America, organized crime. Due to the lawless environment in Chicago, small time gangs were able to build an empire or crime during the Prohibition era and shape law enforcement in America....   [tags: American History] 977 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Biases and the Role of the Individual in History - All historians have biases and these biases shape the way the write history. Some authors write to promote an ideal while others write to educate the public and authors also differ in what aspects of history they write about. When reading any history text it is important to remember why the author wrote and what was important to them. An author like Jo-Ann Shelton writes history to educate people on the social history of Rome by using letters and inscriptions left from individual people, the authors of the fourth edition of A History of Rome write to educate college students on the political and economic history of Rome while occasionally discussing the culture in a traditional text-book fo...   [tags: History, Shelton, Rome]
:: 3 Works Cited
1411 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Seneca and the Apostle Paul: A Study in Comparison - It is no secret that the pagan philosophy of Stoicism has many parallels with Christian doctrine. In fact, this observation is generally accepted by biblical and philosophical scholars alike. These resemblances are most strongly represented within the moral and ethical teachings of both schools of thought and have been the subject of scholarly debate for many years. However the question lies not in whether such similarities exist but on how they came to be; and this can be answered no better than by the letters of both Lucius Annaeus Seneca, a stoic philosopher, and his contemporary, Paul the apostle....   [tags: Religious History]
:: 10 Works Cited
1810 words
(5.2 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
National Identity Over the Course of Time: Peter Sahlins - ... It is only through this exploration that we can fully understand the ways in which people have defined themselves and interacted with others over the course of time. The key place to begin with the discussion of conceptions of ‘us’ and ‘them’, and how they have been used in the process of self-definition, is Edward Said’s groundbreaking work Orientalism. In this, Said’s primary thesis is that Western knowledge of the East (the ‘Orient’) was not rooted in reality but set in mirror image to the west....   [tags: communities, history] 975 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Marcus Brutus: The Tragic Hero Of Julius Ceasar - “A man cannot become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall.”(Aristotle). It should be noted that the Heroes downfall is his own fault as a result of his own free will, At times his death is seen as a waste of human potential. His death usually is not a pure loss, because it results in greater knowledge and awareness. In Julius Ceasar, William Shakespeare develops Marcus Brutus as the Tragic Hero whose ambition and naivety in his blind confidence in the nobility of man sparked guidance in a series of events which inevitably forced him to succumb to self destruction....   [tags: Julius Caesar Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
978 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare - “Nothing is so unbelievable that oratory cannot make it acceptable” ~Marcus Tulius Cicero. After Julius Caesar’s death, his friend Marc Antony decides to speak about the incidents that have occurred in order to clarify what really happened. During Caesar’s funeral speech, Antony utilizes persuasive devices in order to help the plebeians to agree with his point of view. He convinces all of the people using specific evidence from the past, repetition of important words, and statements that create suspense....   [tags: Marc Antony's Speech] 919 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Overview of the Room for Debate Blog Series - The Room for Debate series of blog posts between Bryan A. Garner and Robert Lane Greene presents to the reader two distinct views on various topics including that of authority in language, what makes a good and a bad rule, and what the purpose of these rules is. After reading the posts and doing some research on the people they mention, I noticed that the majority of them, whether lexicographers, linguists or writers (descriptivist or prescriptivist), had privileged upbringings and were educated at prestigious universities....   [tags: blog analysis, bryan a garner, robert lane greene]
:: 1 Works Cited
885 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Michel Eyquem de Montainge on Education of Children - ... Education should entice the interest and feelings, not punish with harsh words and a whip. Learning should be one of the greatest pleasures in the life of a child. Humans are born with a natural curiosity of the world around them, and want to learn the answers to all the “whys” and “hows” of the world. The goal of education is to make the process of learning satisfying and enjoyable. The responsibility of an educator is making sure that the students understand what is taught. A tutor should not always “bawl into a pupil's ears as if one were pouring water into a funnel”5, but make his pupil “taste things, select them, and distinguish them”6 by the pupil's own ability of perception....   [tags: French Renaissance philosophers] 1045 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Analysis of a Conservative Mind by Russel Kirk - Russel Kirk was one of the main contributors to American intellectual conservatism. His work of 1953 is considered to be Kirk’s magnum opus. Author begins his book with the core ideas, which, he believes, appear to be essential for conservatism. What must be mentioned, however, is that Kirk does not provides a list of these six rules, which, according to him, arise to be dogmas of Anglo-American conservatism, but, rather, he proposes six characteristics that belong to a true conservative mind. First and foremost, Kirk asserts that universe if guided by a transcendent rule or body of natural law, that rules people s conscience and society in general....   [tags: characteristics, exist, rights] 2136 words
(6.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Taking a Look at the Ancient Roman Culture - ... The state religion allowed all other religion to be practiced as long the belief did not interfere with the state beliefs. The third idea that led to the success of Roman was its laws. Roman Law was the law that was in effect during the age of antiquity in the City of Rome and later in the Roman Empire. The earliest code of Roman Law was the Law of the Twelve Tables. It was official in 451-450BC from existing oral law by ten magistrates, called decemvirs, and inscribed on tablets of bronze, which were posted in the principal Roman Forum....   [tags: Humanities paper] 1305 words
(3.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
What a Writer Needs to Capture Historical Event - ... Poetry, as other works, focused on two themes: the relationship between man and woman and the treachery and hypocrisy of courtly life. These themes are shown in the sonnets wrote at this time. Sonnets are poems that contain fourteen, ten syllable lines. They were first brought to England by a writer called Petrarch. First time they appeared in English though was by Sir Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, and the Earl of Surrey. Shakespeare and Wyatt are the best known when it comes to the sonnets, even though their works differed....   [tags: renaissance, shakespeare, literature]
:: 14 Works Cited
760 words
(2.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Collision of Ones Conscience and Human Law - ... Man must choose whether or not he will conform to the evils and unjustness’ of society, which damages the divineness of natural law that man was naturally given; or act on an unjust conflict in stride to better society and address the importance of mans opinions in government. According to Cicero, “law is not a matter of written statuses and lists of regulations, but a matter ingrained in the human spirit.” Humans were created by a higher power giving man the power of speech, reason, and thought....   [tags: natural law, corruption, governmental control] 1102 words
(3.1 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Science and Students: The World of Tomorrow - Everyone says this generation is the future, the people and the citizens of tomorrow’s society. Except if this generation is not educated to grow and progress with the planet and learn how to help it, there will be no “next generation”; the earth simply will not be able to sustain our life forms. This is why science education is important to the future of our lives and our planet. Where if not for the innovation of science and its cures, we would still be living in the Dark Ages where the simple flu would have killed a family, and smallpox and other diseases caused epidemics and panics....   [tags: Science Education ] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Life and Works of Niccolo Machiavelli - Niccoló Machiavelli is perhaps the greatest political thinker in history. He was a historian, musician, a poet, and he wrote comedies. He liked poetry as much as he liked philosophy. Machiavelli wrote and collected poems. His works, which are inspired by his life experiences, have been read by many of the worlds greatest politicians. Niccoló Machiavelli’s writing was influenced by the Medici family, the Soderini government in Italy, and his own diplomatic career. His great work, The Prince, is legendary for its impact in politics and its controversial proposals....   [tags: biography]
:: 6 Works Cited
2080 words
(5.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Italic Branch of the Indo-European Language Family - ... Later writers have been known to quote poets of this era, Ennius, Accius, and Lucilius. Archaic Latin, also known as Old Latin, continued for about five hundred years until about the middle of the second century B.C (Fortson 252). Classical Latin took over for about two hundred years and included famous works from Cicero and the governmental proceedings from Caesar. Classical Latin was mostly confined to literature whereas a different variation of Latin, called Vulgar Latin, was the spoken version of the language....   [tags: Language Evolution, World Studies]
:: 1 Works Cited
996 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Moral and Ethics: Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide - Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are actions that hit at the core of what it means to be human - the moral and ethical actions that make us who we are, or who we ought to be. Euthanasia, a subject that is so well known in the twenty-first century, is subject to many discussions about ethical permissibility which date back to as far as ancient Greece and Rome , where euthanasia was practiced rather frequently. It was not until the Hippocratic School removed it from medical practice. Euthanasia in itself raises many ethical dilemmas – such as, is it ethical for a doctor to assist a terminally ill patient in ending his life....   [tags: ethical issues, physician assited suicide]
:: 16 Works Cited
1763 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Exploring St. Augustine of Hippo's Augustine Confessions - ... The fourth book has the story of his years among the Manichaeans, his attraction to astrology and the introduction to other philosophy books. The fifth book centers on his encounter with Faustus. Augustine realizes that Faustus couldn’t answer his questions, and therefore the Manichaeans doctrine left him unsatisfied. After his meeting with Faustus, Augustine flees to Rome where he meets Ambrose and later decides to become a Christian catechumen. The sixth book focuses on St. Augustine discovery of truth from Catholic doctrine....   [tags: autobiographical work] 836 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Roman Republic: An Empire in Disguise - ... And what he means by a common acknowledgment of right he explains at large, showing that a republic cannot be administered without justice. Where, therefore, there is no true justice there can be no right. . . justice is that virtue which gives everyone his due” (Augustus XIX). This quote refers to Rome’s disregard for the common people, called plebeians. The plebeians were given a trivial amount of power to be able to elect tribunes, who were to protect their rights. This liberty did not make up for the horrible living conditions and low income the plebeians had to endure, though....   [tags: political systems in history]
:: 1 Works Cited
776 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Raphael Sanzio da Urbino: A Brief Biography - ... Although he made dozens of them, they never evolved to become full paintings, and left no other visible effects upon his body of work. In 1508 Raphael moved to Rome and in 1510 was commissioned by Pope Julius II to paint the Pope’s personal library. Within this Library Raphael painted four frescos, each symbolizing a virtue of Classicism. Those virtues were philosophy, law, poetry, and theology. In the picture to the right are two of these paintings. On the left is The Parnassus, depicting Apollo and the muses, symbolizing poetry, and on the right is The School of Athens, depicting ancient Greek and Romans philosophers and thinkers, symbolizing philosophy....   [tags: famous artists of the Renaissance] 919 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Crime Boss: North Side Gang Massacre - On a bloody day of February 14, 1929, seven men laid dead upon a blink of an eye in a garage on North Clark Street (Outlaws, Mobsters & Crooks). These men were not any average men, they were gangsters who despised Al Capone, gangsters who desired power over the city, gangsters known as North Side Gang led by the vicious George Moran. So who shot them, who were all behind this notorious massacre. There is only one person to point fingers to and that is Al Capone, the famous all time American gangster, or also known as Scarface....   [tags: george moran, gang, al capone]
:: 5 Works Cited
823 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Demonstrate Significant Ideologies in the Classic World - ... The reason for the attitudes of the Romans regarding worshipping gods were mainly due to avoid forces beyond their control and to gain the god’s favour. These attitudes were influenced from the days when the early Romans were farmers and they had to survive against unexpected acts of nature like floods. Through religious practices of prayer, sacrifice and divination, the Romans made requests and thought the correct ways of worship would help get them what they needed. Also, in order to belong to a community, cultural expectations had to be met....   [tags: religion, roman history, ancient civilization] 1968 words
(5.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Impact of Greek Culture on the Romans - ... Romans and the Greeks share many of the same Gods and Goddesses, or similar ones with different names. As the Romans encountered Greek religion, they began to adopt their religious beliefs. The Romans took several Greek Gods and made them part of the Roman religion such as, “Diana (Artemis), Mercury (Hermes), Neptune (Poseidon), Venus (Aphrodite), and Vulcan (Hephaestus) (Roman Gods). The names were changed, but the original purpose of the God remained similar. The Greek and Roman gods and goddesses became intertwined as Rome began to assimilate the religious beliefs of the Greeks into their culture (Roman Gods)....   [tags: ancient history, lucretius, greek religion] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Can Education be Classical and Christian? - Can an education be both classical and Christian. Many parents ask this question every year, unknowingly echoing an age-old question. Tertullian, an early church father, was perhaps the first to consider whether these two ideas are compatible when he asked, “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” The church fathers continued to wrestle with the question for centuries, most concluding that all ideas that are taken captive for Christ may be used profitably by Christians. Examining this ongoing conversation about classical, Christian education will serve to answer many of our own questions today....   [tags: Informative, Church Schools] 1352 words
(3.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Julius Caesar: Who Was He Really? - ... This alliance helped him gain the upper hand, and begin his ascension into political power. With this political power he became Governor of Gaul, and once Governor he defeated the Helvetians, Germans, and Nervii. Once these enemies were defeated he strove to defeat Germany and Britain. This is when the Senate started to get angered towards the decisions he was making. The Senate explained that no wars should be waged east of the Rhine River, which was ignored by Caesar. Many believe that the war with Britain was mostly propaganda, because Caesar was fighting a war “in unknown lands, against a mystic enemy” (Roman-Empire.net)....   [tags: roman dictator, roman empire]
:: 4 Works Cited
1167 words
(3.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Republic in Shakespeare´s Julius Caesar - One of William Shakespeare’s most revered Roman plays and a tragedy that has stood alone in its place of magnificence in world literature, Julius Caesar is accredited to have been written in 1599. It portrays the 44 BC conspiracy against the Roman dictator Julius Caesar, his assassination and the defeat of the conspirators at the battle of Philippi. It is one among several plays written by Shakespeare that were based on true events from Roman history, others being ‘Coriolanus’ and ‘Antony and Cleopatra’....   [tags: tragedy, civic republicanism]
:: 2 Works Cited
1249 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Personal Opinion: Education and Teaching Methods - In the 12th and 13th centuries, ideas and attitudes regarding education began to change considerably, gaining supreme importance, and in due course leading to an intellectual revolution in the foreseeable 14th century. The main reason for this advancement was the establishment of more towns, resulting in an increased necessity of formal education; Therefore, In 800, although it did not happen immediately, Charlemagne ordered that every town in the “Holy Roman Empire” shall establish a school. With the coming of the economic revival of the late 11th century, educational opportunities became increasingly more achievable....   [tags: History, Social Changes]
:: 1 Works Cited
1249 words
(3.6 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Relation Between Virtue and Happiness - What establishes a noble, valuable, enjoyable life. Many philosophers tried their own beliefs to these ancient and most persistent of philosophical question. Most of Philosophers have agreed that the best possible life is a life where the ideas of “virtue” and “happiness” are fulfilled. Nevertheless expected differences in terms, many great minds theorized that the road to a joyful, flourishing, happy life is paved with virtues. For example, Aristotle believed that anyone keen to live a virtuous life will reach happiness (Aristotle 1992)....   [tags: Virtue and Happiness Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1064 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Brutus And Cassius: Comparing Humans - To compare humans you are simply comparing ideas. Thoughts, experiences and philosophies that all combine together to create individuals. Two experiences and two people who see the same scenario with different perspectives. Such is the way with Brutus and Cassius. This pair of Roman senators shows us the difficulty of having a realist and an idealist work together, yet the pair manages to overcome their different views on the world to work together and assassinate “the foremost man of all this world.” Though, the pair of friends and lovers differences does not simply end at idealism versus realism....   [tags: idealists, realists, roman senators]
:: 1 Works Cited
970 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Life and Victories of Julius Caeser - The Ancient Roman military is considered one to be one of the world’s finest forces. A fearsome force to be reckoned with, few enemies had a chance against this giant of warfare. However, with every great military, there is an even better leader commanding them. Enter Julius Caesar. Defeating enemy forces with ease and willingly showing a sense of mercy to some, he earned great respect from the citizens of Rome. Throughout this exposition, not only the background and life of this great ruler will be displayed, but also his importance and legacy....   [tags: julius caeser, roman military, pompey]
:: 4 Works Cited
1325 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Why Juvenile Choose a Gang Lifestyle? - Gangs have been in existence since the beginning of the Roman Empire. There were speeches made by Roman orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero, which references groups of men who constantly fought and disrupted Roman politics (Curry, 2013). The history of street gangs in the United States begins with their emergence on the East Coast around 1783, as the American Revolution ended. Though many believe the best available evidence suggests that the more serious street gangs likely did not emerge until the early part of the nineteenth century (Sante, 1991)....   [tags: sociological analysis]
:: 20 Works Cited
1784 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Sources of Al Capone's Power - ... Capone attended public school in the city and had a natural brightness by keeping a “B average” despite playing hooky on many occasions. The sixth grade showcased Capone’s short temper when he hit a female teacher who was lecturing him. This incident reveals the beginning of who Al Capone would come to be. After being suspended for his violence, he never officially furthered his education. He began his life of crime by joining the kid gangs that existed all over Brooklyn. These “gangs” were nothing more than children being hoodlums and participating in petty crimes, although they would be the learning stages for the older gangs....   [tags: gangster, prohibition, murder] 733 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Biography of St. Augustine of Hippo - ... However, Augustine did not start until 17, because his father had to save up for the expenses. During his time at Carthage, Augustine came to realize he developed passion for stage plays. From understanding plays, he realized that many of the students were “overturners.” These were students who claimed to have “wild actions with lack of discipline” (p.1230). Because he did not like this, he chose to set a goal and wanted to shine. He went on to read about the importance eloquence and then a book, Hortensius, written by Cicero to search for the truth....   [tags: Bishop, Christianity, Morals]
:: 2 Works Cited
642 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Concept of an International Community - ... 408), the UN attempts to rule over the nations of the world, particularly as it pertains to matters of human rights, war, and peace. Situated at the top of this body are a group of nations deemed the “security council”. This is a group of the world’s most powerful nations and their unanimous decision is needed to authorise any use of international force. Theoretically, the very existence of the UN undermines the realist theory - an international body does exist with a claim to international authority....   [tags: integration, united nations] 1369 words
(3.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Octavian Augustus and his Military Success - ... Due to his new adoptive father, Octavius took a new name, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus. However, many of the people that he was surrounded by simply called him Caesar, and nearly all historians call him Octavian from this point onward, to avoid confusion. Octavian began to move towards Rome from Apollonia, and as he travelled, he slowly gathered a small army of warriors, many of whom had supported Caesar in his previous attempts at expanding his empire. Octavian raised this army with the intention of defending his name from Antony, who was attempting to take over Julius Caesar’s vacant spot at the head of the empire....   [tags: kingdom, fighter, Julius Caesar] 1199 words
(3.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Transformation: Augustine's Journey to Christianity - You prompt us yourself to find satisfaction in appraising you, since you made us tilted toward you, and our heart is unstable until stabilized in you. Quintessentially, this quote from Confessions symbolizes Augustine’s perilous journey towards Christianity. Although appearing earlier in what is colloquially known as the “first autobiography”, Augustine expounds on this very idea throughout his writings. Whether that includes his attraction and disdain for Manichaeism or his affinity with Neo-Platonism, one could argue this quote acted as the foundation of his inquisitions of these pre-modern dogmatic sects....   [tags: Philosophy ]
:: 8 Works Cited
2032 words
(5.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
International Law and Border Control - In 1780, the term “international law” was created and first used by Jeremy Bentham in his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Since about 1840, in the English and Romance Languages it has replaced the older terminology of ‘law of nations’ or ‘droit de gens’ which can be traced back to the Roman concept of ius gentium and the writings of Cicero. Since its inception, there have been different definitions offered to define the term “international law”. For example, Bentham himself defined international law as the law which relates to the mutual transactions between sovereigns as such....   [tags: Immigration] 2154 words
(6.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Roman Empire Over Time - In 336 BCE Alexander the Great inherited both the title from his father, Philip of Macedon, as well his father’s policies. Alexander stated that invading Persia was going to be campaign bent on revenge for the invasion that Persia carried out against Greece in 480 BCE; this invasion would be the start of Alexander’s eastern empire. Alexander was taught and educated by Aristotle, at the age of twenty he was ready to assume to role of king. It was at this time that Alexander created the Hellenistic Age; it was during this time that extraordinary kingdoms were formed....   [tags: History, Roman Leaders] 852 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Philosophy: Living a Happy Life - As one ponders on how to live a good life, many ideas come to mind. Whether this may be wealth, family, or beauty, the early philosopher’s theories need to be taken into consideration. Those early philosophers include Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, and The Epicureans. These four committed their lives towards bettering life, and are the basis of most philosophical theories. It is evident that these four need to be read, understood, and discussed to better understand one’s life. They always pondered on the thought of how to have a perfect life and society....   [tags: Ancient Philosophers, Comparison, Theories]
:: 6 Works Cited
1553 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Brief History of Tour Guide - Guiding is one of the oldest professions of the Western world. The evolution of tour guides and the guiding history was divided by Pond (1993) into four periods. There are plenty of specific references in the annals of history, from the Roman Empire to the Middle Age, throughout the renaissance and into the Modern Age. Tourism saw the first major development during the era of the great empires. (3000 B.C. to A.D.500) During this period travelling is dangerous and time consuming. The ancient Persians, Assyrians and Egyptians pursue to travel through land and water....   [tags: Tourism, oldest profession]
:: 1 Works Cited
1119 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Feminist Glance on Aspasia - Due to a lack of primary source information in relation to the abundance of secondary source material regarding Aspasia and her influence within rhetorical history, tackling the question concerning the amount of influence she held is difficult and, therefore, tackling the question of whether or not her influence was gender-related is more challenging. When grappling with the latter, a significant amount of feminist scholars provide a pool of information, as they see it, to draw from. Scholars like Cheryl Glenn and Madeleine M....   [tags: bias, subjective scholars]
:: 6 Works Cited
1319 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Life of Ernest Hemingway - The making of an author stems from their upbringing or a life altering event that happened in their lives. With most modernist authors, the first World War had changed their mentality as well as the way they wrote their works. Ernest Hemingway was a writer from the Modernist period whose impact comes from the feelings and thoughts he has evoked within his readers and effectively conveyed his consciousness through his works. Hemingway and other Modernists have changed how people view the world and what they bring into it....   [tags: The encrypted diary,modernist period, author]
:: 8 Works Cited
2038 words
(5.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Evolution of Slavery in Justice - ... The payment for such crime called for one-half of the slave’s value. Had an ox supplanted the slave under the same circumstances, the owner of the ox could file no claim against the man who injured his bovine. (“Code of Hammurabi.” 1772 BC.) The significance of the bottom tier crime is that it entitles the enslaved person to a certain right. This thought says something profound about the nature of humanity. Humans value another man’s well-being much more highly than the well-being of an animal, no matter if the human is kin or a member of a conquered tribe....   [tags: Roman Republic, ancient Greece, Hammurabi] 1177 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]


Your search returned 294 essays for "Cicero":
<< Previous  1  2  3  4    Next >>