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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Chopin Lilacs"
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Chopin's Lilacs and the Story of the Annunciation - Chopin's Lilacs and the Story of the Annunciation            When the theologian Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza writes that the myth of the Virgin Mary "sanctions a deep psychological and institutional split" (59) among women in the Catholic tradition, she captures what Kate Chopin also captured in her story "Lilacs." There, sisterhood between secular and religious women appears fragmented and nearly impossible. To scrutinize the division, Kate Chopin fashions her story around the portion of the Virgin Mary myth told in St....   [tags: Chopin Lilacs Essays]
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3310 words
(9.5 pages)
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Death and Regeneration in Walt Whitman's Poem, When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom'd - Death and Regeneration in Walt Whitman's Poem, When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom'd Whitman in 1865 wrote an elegy for President Lincoln entitled "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd." The "Lilacs" elegy is an outpouring of the deep sense of loss that Whitman felt after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The President's death was a great shock to the poet; it overwhelmed him in a very personal way. Whitman recognized Lincoln's excellence and importance. When Whitman first heard of the assassination, it was the spring of the year and the lilacs were in bloom....   [tags: When Lilacs Last Essays] 560 words
(1.6 pages)
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What's Hidden In Kate Chopin's 'The Storm' - What's Hidden in Kate Chopin's "The Storm". Kate Chopin's the storm is about a woman named Calixta who rekindles a lost romance with a former lover in the midst of a storm. This story centers on lost love and being stuck in relationships that are unwanted. There is a lot of hidden meaning in the story, told well behind the characters and their surroundings, and it also has a strong plot, and a lot of symbolism. The plot of a woman and a man rekindling a lost romance in the midst of a storm is one with a lot of innuendos....   [tags: Kate Chopin] 1548 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Awakening on Kate Chopin's The Awakening - ... The Awakening depicts the difficulties women at this time dealt with through the main character, Edna. Chris Trueman states, "Many wives could not leave their husbands even if they wanted to, simply because they did not have the financial independence that was needed to survive at the time. Also a divorced woman was shunned by society and treated as an outcast. With these obstacles, many women were forced to stay in unhappy marriages." (Trueman, Chris. "Women in 1900." History Learning Site....   [tags: Kate Chopin, controversial book,] 1732 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Story of an Hour, by Kate Chopin - “The Story of an Hour” is a stark display of female rejection of the norms of society. This work, by Kate Chopin, begins with a woman going through the stages of grief for her husband’s death. For the wife, Louise Mallard, this was an awakening of a new life. This new life is cut short as the information that led her to believe this news turns our false. Kate Chopin reveals that even the desire for love is trumped by the need for freedom and independence, through her use of precise diction and syntax, and symbolism....   [tags: the story of an hour, kate chopin]
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1182 words
(3.4 pages)
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Chopin’s The Story of an Hour - Kate Chopin’s story “The Story of an Hour” focuses on a married woman who does not find happiness in her marriage. When she hears of her husband’s death, the woman does not grieve for long before relishing the idea of freedom. Chopin’s story is an example of realism because it describes a life that is not controlled by extreme forces. Her story is about a married nineteenth-century woman with no “startling accomplishments or immense abilities” (1271). Chopin stays true to reality and depicts a life that seems as though it could happen to any person....   [tags: literary analysis, kate chopin]
:: 2 Works Cited
1355 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, a woman's entrapment within a patriarchal society reveals to her the bonds of having to live up the society's standards which further demonstrates the corruption and skewed perspectives of the post-Victorian era. In the novella, Edna Pontellier's, a wife of a rich Creole businessman, sexual and spiritual desires surface themselves which distinguishes a separation between her pursuit of happiness and her responsibilities as a mother and wife. As an oppressed character, she does anything in her power to achieve freedom, no matter how sinful the acts to getting there may be....   [tags: Kate Chopin, Analysis] 997 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - Illogical, submissive, and sensual are some of the words used to describe the view of women during the nineteenth century. In the novel The Awakening, Kate Chopin tells the controversial story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, and her spiritual growing. Throughout the story, Edna constantly battles between her heart’s desires and society’s standard. The novel shows how two women’s lives influence Edna throughout the novel. Mademoiselle Reisz and Madame Ratignolle are both in their own way strong, motherly influences in Edna’s life....   [tags: awakening, kate chopin]
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1258 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - The Awakening is set in 1899, a time when the Industrial Revolution and the women's movement were just beginning , conversely, still overshadowed by the attitudes of society in the 19th century. Kate Chopin's idea that a woman’s needs were important was somewhat radical, especially since women were not considered to be independent, and women’s rights were still being fought for. Edna's major conflict is her need for independence and personal fulfillment while still trying to conform to her traditional upbringing....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, Kate Chopin] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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Edna's Suicide in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna's Suicide in Kate Chopin's The Awakening At the end of Kate Chopin's novel „The Awakening" the protagonist Edna commits suicide. The remaining question for the reader is: Does Edna's suicide show that she succeeded or failed in her struggle for independence. Edna's new life in independency seems to be going well especially after Robert had returned from Mexico. The lover, who she met during her vacation at Grand Isle, told her that he loves her and he wants to marry her. But her mood changes when her friend Adéle tells her that she should care more about her family as she does not spend enough time with her family because of her affairs....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Analysis] 971 words
(2.8 pages)
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A State of Mind in Kate Chopin’s "Storm" - During the Victorian women were sees as slaves to their house hold. Kate Chopin uses the beginning, climax and resolution of the story as a storm. Throughout the story she uses vivid imagery and careful word choices in order to add detail to the dramatic plot of the story. Kate Chopin’s "Storm" represents something much greater than a weather phenomenon but a metaphysical symbol that represents freedom of choice, and women birthright"; Kate Chopin also describes how men are the creators of these storms....   [tags: Kate Chopin, Storm]
:: 1 Works Cited
1091 words
(3.1 pages)
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Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - The Feminist Awakening - The Feminist Awakening   Women’s rights have evolved over time; beginning with being homemakers and evolving to obtaining professions, acquiring an education, and gaining the right to vote. The movement that created all these revolutionary changes was called the feminist movement. The feminist movement occurred in the twentieth century. Many people are not aware of the purpose of the feminist movement. The movement was political and social and it sought to set up equality for women. Women’s groups in the United States worked together to win women’s suffrage and later to create and support the Equal Rights Amendment....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening]
:: 5 Works Cited
2101 words
(6 pages)
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An Example of Women Enslaved: "The Story of An Hour" by Kate Chopin - Over the years the roles of women and their rights have drastically changed. They have been dominated, trapped, and enslaved by their marriage. Women have slowly evolved into individuals that have rights and can stand on their own. Though some women are still enslaved, the rate is lesser than in the old days. The myth that women are meant to be housewives has been changed. They are now individuals seen in highly reputable places. However, this change did not happen overnight, it took years to happen.” The Story of An Hour” by Kate Chopin might be a short story, but it shows how women felt obligated to stay with their husbands despite the fact that they were unhappy with them....   [tags: Story of An Hour, Kate Chopin, ] 413 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Two Storms in Kate Chopin’s story “The Storm" - In Kate Chopin’s story “The Storm” it talks about love and lust. It speaks of two kind of storm that occurs. These two storms I find to be the central part of the story, and is being represented as a symbol within the story. The first storm is the most obvious one that Bibi and Bobinot are faced with. The second storm isn’t that visible for it involves Calixta and Alcee. Just as like most storms they come and pass. As the story begins we find Bibi and Bobinot on their way home. They were at Friedheimer’s store; they notice the dark clouds flowing with evil intentions to the west....   [tags: Kate Chopin, Storm, ] 610 words
(1.7 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Story Of An Hour - Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour Question #1 Compare and contrast women's roles and marriage in "The Story of an Hour" and "The Yellow Wallpaper." Mrs. Mallard had heart trouble and is very sick. After the news of her husbands death she locked herself in her room and all she could think was she was finally free. She knew she would weep again when she saw her husband with his hands folded in death, but all she could think as she sat in the room all alone was of the many years she would have ahead of her to only live for herself: "But she saw beyond that bitter moment a long procession of years to come that would belong to her absolutely" (Danticat 138)....   [tags: Kate Chopin] 1629 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Kiss By Kate Chopin - Things and People are not always as they appear to be on the first sight that is why we have to examine them in different ways otherwise they may mislead us. That is more then true in the short story "The Kiss" by Kate Chopin in which she uses imagery, irony and simile to show us how deceitful a person can be. She tells us by the actions of her characters that a person should not be judged solely by his or her appearance or words because those things can be dangerously misleading. All of the characters in Chopin story play their own games and in more or less visible way try to manipulate others to achieve their own sometimes not very righteous goals, but who will eventually succeed in realiz...   [tags: Kate Chopin] 1046 words
(3 pages)
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The Importance of Setting and Symbols in "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin - Ranging from caged parrots to the meadow in Kentucky, symbols and settings in The Awakening are prominent and provide a deeper meaning than the text does alone. Throughout The Awakening by Kate Chopin, symbols and setting recur representing Edna’s current progress in her awakening. The reader can interpret these and see a timeline of Edna’s changes and turmoil as she undergoes her changes and awakening. The setting Edna is in directly affects her temperament and awakening: Grand Isle provides her with a sense of freedom; New Orleans, restriction; the “pigeon house”, relief from social constraints....   [tags: Setting, Symbols, Awakening, Kate Chopin, ]
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999 words
(2.9 pages)
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White Lilacs - White Lilacs by Carolyn Meyer I predict that . . . the Jefferson family will have many more harsh times ahead. I think this because they are already struggling to bring home enough money to get by. And I also think that Henrys attitude will get him in trouble and put more stress on the family. If this was a movie I'd title it . . . Freedom, unless it was narrated then I would use White Lilacs because you would need to here Rose Lee's thoughts to understand the title White Lilacs. I also think that the movie would be more interesting if it was narrated....   [tags: essays research papers] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Deconstructionist Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening - A Deconstructionist Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening The multiplicity of meanings and (re)interpretations informing critical studies of The Awakening reveal a novel ripe for deconstructionist critique. Just as Chopin evokes an image of the sea as symbolic of Edna’s shifting consciousness (“never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander in abysses of solitude,”138), likewise the deconstructionist reading of a text emphasizes fluidity over structure: “A text consists of words inscribed in and inextricable from the myriad discourses that inform it; from the point of view of deconstruction, the boundaries between any given text and that larger text we call langua...   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 523 words
(1.5 pages)
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Contradictory Impulses in Chopin’s The Awakening - Contradictory Impulses in Chopin’s The Awakening “Edna Pontellier could not have told why, wishing to go to the beach with Robert, she should in the first place have declined, and in the second place have followed in obedience to one of the two contradictory impulses that impelled her. A certain light was beginning to dawn dimly within her,--the light which, showing the way, forbids it,” (Chopin 34). The possibility of a life beyond the scope of motherhood, social custom, standards of femininity, and wifedom characterize Kate Chopin’s vision of her heroine’s awakening, but Edna’s personal growth remains stifled by her inability to reconcile the contradictory impulses pulling her in differen...   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 532 words
(1.5 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour - Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour      Kate Chopin was a Victorian writer; whose writing manifests her life experiences. She was not happy with the principles of the time, because women had fewer rights, and they were not considered equal to men. Afraid of segregation from society, people lived in a hypocritical world full of lies; moreover, Kate Chopin was not afraid of segregation, and used her writing as a weapon against oppression of the soul. Marriage was an oppressor to Chopin, she had been a victim of this institution....   [tags: Kate Chopin The Story of an Hour] 394 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Misleading Message of Chopin's The Storm - The Misleading Message of Chopin's The Storm Kate Chopin's "The Storm" focuses on two simultaneous and related storms, one a fierce tempest of the natural world with the expected rain, wind, lightening, and thunder, the other a cyclone of the mind and heart which results in an short love affair between the two main characters. With her husband Bobinot and her son Bibi stranded in town by the storm, Calixta finds herself at home alone when an old lover, Alcee, rides up. The storm, the worst in two years, drives the two indoors, where, though they have not met in five years, they soon are embracing each other....   [tags: Chopin Storm Essays] 1128 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Nature of Solitude in Chopin's Novel, The Awakening - The Nature of Solitude in Chopin's Novel, The Awakening "The name of the piece was something else, but she called it ‘Solitude.' When she heard it there came before her imagination the figure of a man standing beside a desolate rock on the seashore. He was naked. His attitude was one of hopeless resignation as he looked toward a distant bird winging its flight away from him."(47) "All along the white beach, up and down, there was no living thing in sight. A bird with a broken wing was beating the air above, reeling, fluttering, circling disabled down, down to the water...when she was there beside the sea, absolutely alone, she cast the unpleasant, pricking garments from her, and for the...   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 828 words
(2.4 pages)
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Racial, Social, and Symbolic Elements in Desiree's Baby by Kate Chopin - When I think about starting over, I am often reminded of Armand in the story of “Desiree Baby”. Armand, the protagonist in the story built a bonfire in the efforts of trying to erase away the memory of his wife Desiree, and his son. Armand’s bonfire symbolizes Armand wanting to start over and forget his past. Throughout the short story many elements of symbolism was used to convey a central message those include discussing symbols of racism, social class distinction, and the symbolic elements involving the difference between the gender roles....   [tags: Desiree's Baby by Kate Chopin]
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1175 words
(3.4 pages)
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Importance of the Ocean in Chopin's Awakening - Importance of the Ocean in Chopin's Awakening        In Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, Chopin uses the motif of the ocean to signify the awakening of Edna Pontellier. Chopin compares the life of Edna to the dangers and beauty of a seductive ocean. Edna's fascinations with the unknown wonders of the sea help influence the reader to understand the similarities between Edna's life and her relationship with the ocean. Starting with fear and danger of the water then moving to a huge symbolic victory over it, Chopin uses the ocean as a powerful force in Edna's awakening to the agony and complexity of her life....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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871 words
(2.5 pages)
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Foreshadowing in Kate Chopin's The Storm - Foreshadowing in The Storm Effectively using foreshadowing in a piece of literature enhances the reader's curiosity. One clear example of such usage is seen in Kate Chopin's writing. Her use of foreshadowing in the short story "The Storm" adds an element of intrigue, holding the reader's interest throughout. In this story a father and son, Bobinôt and Bibi, are forced to remain in the store where they were shopping, waiting for an approaching storm to pass. Meanwhile, the wife and mother, Calixta, remaining at home, receives an unexpected visit from a former lover of hers, Alcée....   [tags: Chopin Storm Essays] 1069 words
(3.1 pages)
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Edna and Conformity in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna and Conformity in Chopin’s The Awakening The passage of The Awakening which truly marks Edna Pontellier’s new manner of thought regarding her life revolves around her remembrance of a day of her childhood in Kentucky. She describes the scene to Madame Ratigonelle as the two women sit on the beach one summer day. The passage opens with a description of the sea and the sky on that particular day. This day and its components are expressed in lethargic terms such as “idly” and “motionless” and suggested a scene of calm sleep....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 618 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening - The Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening In “The Metaphorical Lesbian: Edna Pontellier in The Awakening” Elizabeth LeBlanc asserts that the character Edna Pontellier is an example of what Bonnie Zimmerman calls the “metaphorical lesbian.” It’s important to distinguish between Zimmerman’s concept of the “metaphorical lesbian” and lesbianism. The “metaphorical lesbian” does not have to act on lesbian feelings or even become conscious of herself as a lesbian. Instead, the “metaphorical lesbian” creates a space for woman-identified relationships and experiences in a heterosexually hegemonic environment....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening - Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening Several passages in The Awakening struck me because of their similar imagery—a bird, wings, and nudity. The first passage I looked at is in Chapter 9 where Edna Pontellier has a vision of a naked man “standing beside a desolate rock” (47) on a beach who is watching a bird fly away. This image was evoked by a one particular piece that Mme Ratignolle plays which Edna significantly calls “Solitude. ” Apparently Edna frequently envisions certain images while listening to music: “Musical strains, well rendered, had a way of evoking pictures in her mind” (47)....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 734 words
(2.1 pages)
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Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Birth, whether of children or desires, plays a strong motif throughout The Awakening. The four components of childbirth, which Edna—the novel’s main character—recalls as she witnesses her friend Madame Ratignolle give birth, represent major themes Chopin emphasizes throughout her novel. These four components are “ecstasy of pain, the heavy odor of chloroform, a stupor which had deadened sensation, and an awakening to find a little new life” (133). In childbirth, the first three components are necessary to achieve the fourth: the awakening to find a new life....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Essays]
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2916 words
(8.3 pages)
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Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Chopin's The Awakening is full of symbolism.  Rather than hit the reader on the head with blunt literalism, Chopin uses symbols to relay subtle ideas.  Within each narrative segment, Chopin provides a symbol that the reader must fully understand in order to appreciate the novel as a whole.  I will attempt to dissect some of the major symbols and give possible explanations as to their importance within the text.  Art itself is a symbol of both freedom and failure.  In her attempt to become an artist, Edna reaches the zenith of her awakening.  She begins to truly understand pure art as a means of self-expression as well as self-assertion.  In a si...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays Kate]
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1483 words
(4.2 pages)
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Ambiguity in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Ambiguity in The Awakening        Leonce Pontellier, the husband of Edna Pontellier in Kate Chopin's The Awakening, becomes very perturbed when his wife, in the period of a few months, suddenly drops all of her responsibilities. After she admits that she has "let things go," he angrily asks, "on account of what?" Edna is unable to provide a definite answer, and says, "Oh. I don't know. Let me along; you bother me" (108). The uncertainty she expresses springs out of the ambiguous nature of the transformation she has undergone....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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3587 words
(10.2 pages)
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Desiree's Baby by Kate Chopin - "Desiree's Baby" by Kate Chopin "Desiree's Baby", by Kate Chopin, is a story about the effect love and pride have on our actions. Love changes people for the better. "Love is patient and kind. Love is not jealous or boastful or proud or rude. Love does not demand its own way. Love is not irritable, and it keeps no record of when it has been wronged. It is never glad about injustice but rejoices whenever the truth wins out. Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance." Pride, however, can have the opposite effect....   [tags: Kate Chopin Desiree's Baby]
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864 words
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Kate Chopin's Unorthodox Awakening - Kate Chopin's Unorthodox Awakening The Awakening, written by Kate Chopin, was a book that was truly ahead of its time. The author of the book was truly a genius in her right, but yet she was seen as a scoundrel. At the time, it was "a world that values only her performance as a mother, whose highest expectations for women are self sacrifice and self-effacement." ( . ) The people of that era were not ready to admit or accept the simple but hidden feelings of intimacy or sexuality and the true nature of womanhood....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 603 words
(1.7 pages)
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Kate Chopin's Desiree's Baby - Kate Chopin's Desiree's Baby This essay will focus on the short story by Kate Chopin and its use of symbols, setting and characters. Desiree’s baby was perhaps one of the best stories I’ve ever read. Analyzing it was not easy at all. Its use of symbols was very hard to comprehend. At first, it doesn’t make sense. But as you think critically, all the symbols, and setting and the characters in this literature plunge together in one amazing story....   [tags: Kate Chopin Desiree's Baby] 1392 words
(4 pages)
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Criticism of The Storm by Kate Chopin - Criticism of The Storm by Kate Chopin While it has traditionally been men who have attached the "ball and chain" philosophy to marriage, Kate Chopin gave readers a woman’s view of how repressive and confining marriage can be for a woman, both spiritually and sexually. While many of her works incorporated the notion of women as repressed beings ready to erupt into a sexual a hurricane, none were as tempestuous as The Storm. Kate Chopin was a woman whose feminist viewpoints were far ahead of her time, which of course garnered her more than her share of criticism....   [tags: Kate Chopin Storm Sexuality Essays] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Understanding Chopin's The Awakening - Understanding Chopin's The Awakening By reading The Awakening, the reader gets a sense of what the life of a Creole woman is like.  In actuality, though, it is not until reading the etiquette books, Chopin’s biographical information, and essays about the treatment of women at the time that there can be a deeper understanding of the rules Edna is breaking. Passages from Chopin's Biographical Information Fawned over as a society belle, admired for her cleverness and musical talent, Kate wrote what she really thought in her diary: “I dance with people I despise; amuse myself with men whose only talent is in their feet.” She wrote advice about how to flirt (just keep asking, “What do you th...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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794 words
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's novella The Awakening tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a woman who throughout the novella tries to find herself. Edna begins the story in the role of the typical mother-woman distinctive of Creole society but as the novelette furthers so does the distance she puts between herself and society. Edna's search for independence and a way to stray from society's rules and ways of life is depicted through symbolism with birds, clothing, and Edna's process of learning to swim....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening] 1023 words
(2.9 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - During the late nineteenth century, the time of protagonist Edna Pontellier, a woman's place in society was confined to worshipping her children and submitting to her husband. Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, encompasses the frustrations and the triumphs in a woman's life as she attempts to cope with these strict cultural demands. Defying the stereotype of a "mother-woman," Edna battles the pressures of 1899 that command her to be a subdued and devoted housewife. Although Edna's ultimate suicide is a waste of her struggles against an oppressive society, The Awakening supports and encourages feminism as a way for women to obtain sexual freedom, financial independence, and individual identi...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1882 words
(5.4 pages)
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Kate Chopin Short Stories - Kate Chopin was an American feminist fiction writer and a woman ahead of her time. She lived in the socially conservative nineteenth-century, but in her stories, she wrote about unconventional characters, particularly women, that caused others to question her morality. Similar to the female characters in her stories, Kate Chopin was an independent woman. She would often smoke cigarettes or walk in the streets unaccompanied; these practices were considered unusual for a nineteenth-century woman to do ("Katherine Chopin")....   [tags: Kate Chopin Works Author] 1661 words
(4.7 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour - Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" In “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, the author depicts how someone can be trapped in an unproductive and unsatisfying reality because of other’s thoughtlessness, exploitation, and domination. When combined with the contemporary society’s belief, presumably the later half of the 19th century, a further understanding of Chopin’s thoughts and feelings can be realized. Mrs. Louise Mallard, the victim and messenger of this story, is the image of such a person....   [tags: Kate Chopin Story Hour Essays] 664 words
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The Shocking Ideas of Kate Chopin's The Awakening - The Shocking Ideas of The Awakening Ideas that resist existing social boundaries commonly are rejected at first, because people don’t want to wake up from their reliable lives. Kate Chopin, however, believed that an awakening was in order, and she attempted to open the eyes of society through her novel The Awakening. The public’s reaction to Chopin’s novel was not one of acceptance. "Too strong a drink for moral babies, and should be labeled ‘poison,’" was the how the Republic described Chopin's work (Seyersted 174)....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1874 words
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Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening "Too strong a drink for moral babies, and should be labeled `poison'." was the how the Republic described Kate Chopin's most famous novel The Awakening (Seyersted 174). This was not only the view of one magazine, but it summarized the feelings of society as a whole. Chopin woke up people to the feelings and minds of women. Even though her ideas were controversial at first, slowly over the decades people began to accept them. Kate O'Flaherty Chopin was raised in St....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1810 words
(5.2 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Kate Chopin's The Awakening In Kate Chopin's, The Awakening, Edna Pontellier came in contact with many different people during a summer at Grand Isle. Some had little influence on her life while others had everything to do with the way she lived the rest of her life. The influences and actions of Robert Lebrun on Edna led to her realization that she could never get what she wanted, which in turn caused her to take her own life. In the Creole culture, outward affection and expression were a common thing....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1261 words
(3.6 pages)
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening expresses the difficulty of finding a woman’s place in society. Edna learns of new ideas such as freedom and independence while vacationing in Grand Isle. Faced with a choice to conform to society’s expectations or to obey personal desires for independence, Edna Pontellier realizes that either option will result in dissatisfaction. Thus, Edna’s awakening in Grand Isle leads to her suicide. Edna’s awakening occurs during her family’s vacation in Grand Isle....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Essays] 1346 words
(3.8 pages)
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Relationship between Chopin's Life and The Awakening - Relationship between Chopin's Life and The Awakening Katherine O'Flahtery Chopin was born in St. Louis, Missouri February 8,1851. She was the daughter of Thomas and Eliza O'Flaherty, a prominent Irish-born merchant and his wife. Together, Chopin's parents represented freedom and the American dream. Their ambition and spirit helped mold Chopin into a unique character with independence and intelligence. Her father died suddenly when Chopin was four years old. His death was the result of a terrible accident that took the lives of several civic leaders when the key link to the Pacific Railroad was being completed and a bridge collapsed....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1364 words
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Kate Chopin's Desiree's Baby - Desiree's Baby is a short story written by Kate Chopin. It is set in 19th century Louisiana. The story starts with Madame Valmonde going to visit Desiree and her baby. She thinks back on her memories of Desiree as a baby: "It made her laugh to think of Desiree with a baby. Why it seemed but yesterday that Desiree was little more than a baby herself." This quote tells us two things. The first is that Madame Valmonde must have known Desiree as a child and is either a close family friend of even a member of the family herself....   [tags: Desiree's Baby by Kate Chopin] 1756 words
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Female Sexuality & Desire in Chopin's The Storm - Female Sexuality & Desire in Chopin's The Storm           In Kate Chopin's time traditional patriarchal notions about women and sexuality deemed sexual passion a negligible, even improper, aspect of women's lives. Yet Chopin boldly addresses a woman's sexual desire in her short story "The Storm". This story shockingly details a torrid extramarital sexual encounter between Calixta and Alcee` in the midst of a raging storm. While this story line could have been presented in a traditional light, perhaps as a lesson about the evils of uninhibited female sexuality, Chopin maintains a non-judgmental stance by refraining from moralizing about the sanctity of marriage or impropriety of Calixta's...   [tags: Chopin Storm Essays]
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Evaluation of Mother-Women in Chopin’s The Awakening - Evaluation of Mother-Women in Chopin’s The Awakening In short, Mrs. Pontellier was not a mother-woman. The mother women seemed to prevail that summer at Grand Isle. It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood. They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels. (p.29) She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 638 words
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Showalter’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening - Showalter’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening In “Tradition and the Female Talent: The Awakening as a Solitary Book,” Elaine Showalter makes a compelling argument that “Edna Pontellier’s ‘unfocused yearning’ for an autonomous life is akin to Kate Chopin’s yearning to write works that go beyond female plots and feminine endings” (204). Urging her reader to read The Awakening “in the context of literary tradition,” Showalter demonstrates the ways in which Chopin’s novel both builds upon and departs from the tradition of American women’s writing up to that point....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 598 words
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Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening - Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening In her essay "Un-Utterable Longing: The Discourse of Feminine Sexuality in Kate Chopin's The Awakening", Cynthia Griffin Wolff creates what Ross Murfin describes as "a critical whole that is greater than the sum of its parts." (376) By employing a variety of critical approaches (including feminist, gender, cultural, new historicism, psychoanalytic and deconstruction) Wolff offers the reader a more complete (albeit complex) explanation of Edna Pontellier's behavior and motivations than any single approach could provide....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 638 words
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Analysis of The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin -      In "The Story of an Hour" Kate Chopin tells the story of a woman, Mrs. Mallard whose husband is thought to be dead. Throughout the story Chopin describes the emotions Mrs. Mallard felt about the news of her husband's death. However, the strong emotions she felt were not despair or sadness, they were something else. In a way she was relieved more than she was upset, and almost rejoiced in the thought of her husband no longer living. In using different literary elements throughout the story, Chopin conveys this to us on more than one occasion....   [tags: The Story of an Hour Kate Chopin]
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Irony in Kate Chopin's Story of an Hour - Irony in Chopin's Story of an Hour   Irony is a useful device for giving stories many unexpected twists and turns. In Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour," irony is used as an effective literary device. Situational irony is used to show the reader that what is expected to happen sometimes doesn't. Dramatic irony is used to clue the reader in on something that is happening that the characters in the story do not know about. Irony is used throughout Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" through the use of situational irony and the use of dramatic irony....   [tags: Chopin Story of An Hour Essays]
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The Role of the Doctor in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - The Role of the Doctor in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening According to Benjamin, or at least according to my Benjamin, as translated then taken from secondary sources that probably used him to their own ends, the novel is constructed along a trajectory he calls “homogenous, empty time” referring to the contiguous relation of characters and their activities to each other as a way of connecting their place in the narrative. There are quite a few examples of this in Kate Chopin’s Awakening, but the best is found on page 87 of Chapter XXII as the doctor is introduced into the text....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 653 words
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Understanding Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening - Understanding Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening “Un-Utterable Longing” analyzes The Awakening from the diverse, yet overlapping perspectives of deconstruction, feminist/gender theory, new historicism, and psychoanalytic criticism. Much like Yaeger and Treichler, Wolff attributes Edna’s struggle and eventual demise to her failed search for a language that voices her (un)womanly desires. Wolff first adopts the new historicist viewpoint to situate Edna as a 19th-century southern woman, presenting a very real conflict between: the dominating values of her time and place; and her own innermost passions and needs....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 857 words
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Yaeger’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening - Yaeger’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening In “‘A Language Which Nobody Understood’: Emancipatory Strategies in The Awakening,” Patricia Yaeger questions the feminist assumption that Edna Pontellier’s adulterous behavior represent a radical challenge to patriarchal values. Using a deconstructionist method, Yaeger argues that in the novel adultery functions not as a disrupting agent of, but, rather, as a counterweight to the institution of marriage, reinforcing the very idea it purports to subvert by framing female desire within “an elaborate code [of moral conduct] that has already been negotiated by her society.” A reading of The Awakening that can envision only two possible outcomes f...   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 992 words
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Social Commentary in Chopin's The Story of an Hour - Social Commentary in Chopin's The Story of an Hour IN "The Story of an Hour," Kate Chopin tells the tale of a woman who learns of her husband's untimely death, seeks solitude in which she proceeds to reflect upon this incident and its implications, has a life-altering/-giving epiphany, and proceeds to have all of the fresh hope and elation that had accompanied this experience dashed when her supposedly dead husband appears alive and well at her door, thereby inducing her sudden death. Read in isolation, it seems as if this is merely a detailed account of one woman's reaction to the death of her husband and, on a basic and concrete level, it is....   [tags: Chopin Story of An Hour Essays]
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Finding Freedom in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Finding Freedom in The Awakening    The Awakening was shocking to readers in 1899, and would be today if it were published in “Ladies Home Journal”. Even today, women are expected to sacrifice themselves, if not to their husbands, then definitely to their children. I find it interesting that Grand Isle is the setting for the beginning and end of the novel. The story is built around a circle and represents the whirling force that is the energy of Edna’s life. The circle reminds me of Yeats’ “The Second Coming” : “Turning and turning in the widening gyre/things fall apart/the center cannot hold.”  So often I wanted Edna to act and she didn’t, I suppose that it is Chopin’s purpose to not...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 671 words
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Edna as a Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna as a Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening Elizabeth LeBlanc places The Awakening in an interesting context in her essay “The Metaphorical Lesbian,” as gender criticism must, for Chopin wrote the novel at the end of the 19th century, when homosexuality as an identity emerged culturally, at least in terms of the gay male identity, as proffered by Oscar Wilde across the Atlantic. Lesbianism, too, started to make its debut on the cultural stage, particularly in literature. However, although lesbianism started to emerge during Chopin’s lifetime, it seems doubtful that it played any formative role for Edna’s characterization....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 548 words
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Symbolism in Chapter 17 of Chopin’s The Awakening - Symbolism in Chapter 17 of Chopin’s The Awakening The end of Chapter 17 in Chopin’s THE AWAKENING offers a richly compressed portrait of a woman desperate to break through the bonds of domesticity and embark into the unknown. The passages (pages 74 and 75) immediately follow the dinner scene in which Edna first announces to Léonce that she will longer observe the ritual of Tuesday reception day. After Léonce departs for the club, Edna eats her dinner alone and retires to her room: “It was a large, beautiful room, rich and picturesque in the soft, dim light which the maid had turned low....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 1177 words
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Freedom in Kate Chopin's The Story of An Hour - Freedom in Kate Chopin's The Story of An Hour In Kate Chopin's "The Story of An Hour" the theme is found within the concept of how someone can be trapped in a repressive, unsatisfying reality because of another's thoughtless oppression and manipulation. When combined with the contemporary society's beliefs --- presumably the later half of the 19th century for this story -- a further understanding of Chopin's thoughts and feelings can be realized. Mrs. Louise Mallard, the victim and messenger of this story, is the representation of such a person....   [tags: Chopin Story of An Hour Essays]
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LeBlanc’s Gender Criticism of Chopin’s The Awakening - LeBlanc’s Gender Criticism of Chopin’s The Awakening Tomorrow marks thirty years since the Roe vs. Wade decision that gave women a reproductive choice in America. The occasion reminds me that women are continuously struggling to attain and maintain various levels of freedom. Elizabeth LeBlanc’s gender criticism of The Awakening---a novel published before women acquired suffrage---highlights one such freedom: the freedom to live on one’s own terms. The discussion delineates how Kate Chopin’s tale of one woman’s “choices, actions and attitudes may be construed as the attempts of a woman trapped in a sexually (in)different world to reconstitute herself as lesbian” (241)....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 497 words
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Oppression of Women in Chopin's The Story Of An Hour - Oppression of Women in Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" In an age where bustles, petticoats, and veils stifled women physically, it is not surprising that society imposed standards that stifled them mentally. Women were molded into an ideal form from birth, with direction as to how they should speak, act, dress, and marry. They lacked education, employable skills, and rights in any form. Every aspect of their life was controlled by a male authority figure starting with their father at birth and persisting through early womanhood into marriage where it was the husband who possessed control....   [tags: Kate Chopin Victorian Era] 722 words
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Free Awakening Essays: Kate Chopin - The Awakening: Kate Chopin Kate Chopin was an American author who lived during the nineteenth century, but because of The Awakening, a novel which was considered scandalous at the time, she has just recently been "…accepted into the canon of major American writers"(Trosky 105). Through Kate Chopin’s main character of The Awakening, Edna Pontellier, she is able to portray her feelings and desires that were otherwise suppressed by the ideals of American society at that time. Kate Chopin was born on February 8, 1851 in St....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1278 words
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Love and Self in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Love and Self in The Awakening                  Kate Chopin's The Awakening is often said to triumph the exploration on the emotional and sexual needs of women, and the novel certainly is about that to a great extent, but even more importantly, it is a quest for individuality and the meaning of love. Through the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, Chopin describes in her novel one woman's journey towards self-consciousness. Several stages of 'awakenings' can be detected on the road, which are discussed in detail, along with the themes of romantic love, possession and an individual self....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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LeBlanc’s Analysis of Sexuality in Chopin’s The Awakening - LeBlanc’s Analysis of Sexuality in Chopin’s The Awakening Definitions are tricky things. Such is the conclusion of Ross C. Murfin in his attempts to spell out the major literary theories discussed in our text: "attempts to highlight the difference between feminist and gender criticism are inevitably prone to reductive overgeneralization and occasional distortion"(footnote p.226). Such is the conclusion of gender theorists in general in their pursuit of critiquing the traditional definitions of male/ female, masculine/ feminine, and heterosexual/ homosexual....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 995 words
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Symbolism of the Sea in Chopin’s The Awakening - Symbolism of the Sea in Chopin’s The Awakening “The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace.” This short quotation from the end of chapter 6 of Kate Chopin’s the Awakening is crucial to understanding the text as a whole and is also a vital example of foreshadowing....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 448 words
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A Storm of Emotion in Kate Chopin's The Storm - The Storm of Emotion Usually a storm creeps upon us, hits a luminous climax, and then fades away into nothingness.  In The Storm, Kate Chopin develops a parallel between a rainstorm and an emotional storm in a woman’s life.  Chopin uses symbolism to depict the feelings of relationships that are as unpredictable as that of a raging storm.     In the time frame that this story is set, many major life decisions things are made taking into account one’s duty to family - including the selection of a husband or wife.  It is possible that each of these couples may not have been in love,  when their vows were stated.  They have a duty to society; they must not marry outside of their social c...   [tags: Chopin Storm Essays]
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Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - The Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's The Awakening is truly a novel that stands out from the rest. From the moment it was published, it has been caused women to examine their beliefs. The fact that The Awakening was shunned when first published, yet now taught in classrooms across the country is proof that The Awakening is full of rebellious and controversial ideas. One of the main themes explored in The Awakening is that of a woman's place in society....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Love and Death in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Love and Death in The Awakening         "It was when the face and figure of a great tragedian began to haunt her imagination and stir her senses. The persistence of the infatuation lent it an aspect of genuineness. The hopelessness of it colored it with the lofty tones of a great passion:" (Chopin 17) a passion that eventually lost its newness and was relegated to the shelf that held vague, yet comfortably delightful remembrances. The tragedian keeps company with a visiting cavalry officer and an engaged gentleman....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Edna’s Search for Solitude in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna’s Search for Solitude in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Home from a summer at Grand Isle, separated from the company of an agreeable and, eventually beloved, companion and in the stifling company of a disagreeable, oblivious husband, Edna Pontellier sees her home, her garden, her fashionable neighborhood as "an alien world which had suddenly become antagonistic" (76). When she is left alone in the house, she thrills to the sensation of free time and space, the chance to explore, investigate, to see her house in its own light....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 1270 words
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An Analysis of Page 69-70 of Chopin’s The Awakening - An Analysis of Page 69-70 of Chopin’s The Awakening Each time I read The Awakening, I am drawn to the passage on page 69 where Edna and Madame Ratignolle argue about “the essential” and “the unessential.” Edna tries to explain, “I would give up the unessential; I would give my money, I would give my life for my children; but I wouldn’t give myself.” What most would see as essential—money (you need it for food, clothing, shelter, etc) and life—Edna sees as “unessential.” Edna is speaking of more than that which one needs for physical survival; she would not hesitate to give her life to save the life of one of her children....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 432 words
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The Development of Action in Kate Chopin's The Storm - The Development of Action in The Storm "The Storm" by Kate Chopin is about a storm that passes through a coastal townin the Southern United States. The story charts the different phases of the storm, and then associates the character interaction with each phase. The tension between characters increases as the physical aspects of the storm become more violent. This essay will outline the development of the storm and coincide character relationships with the outline. The passing of the storm is the central action in The Storm and this essay will analyze the affect it has on the story as a whole....   [tags: Chopin Storm Essays] 899 words
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The Importance of the Sea in Chopin’s The Awakening - The Importance of the Sea in Chopin’s The Awakening Unlike María Eugenia, Edna in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening chooses not to fill her family’s expectations. As she takes her final steps into the sea she thinks to herself: “they need not have thought that they could possess her, body and soul” (655). Edna treasures her autonomy and chooses death over familial subjugation. However her transformational journey, alluded to by the title of the novel leads to more than the rejection of her self-sacrificing familial roles as wife and mother and her death....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 2336 words
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Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper - Kate Chopin wrote “The Story of an Hour” in 1894; it describes a young married women named Louise confronting years of suppression that vanish with her husband’s death leaving her with unimaginable freedom. A few years later in 1899, Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote “The Yellow Wallpaper” which portrayed a married woman’s struggle against insanity. The similarities between the two would seem unapparent, other than the fact that both women in the stories are married. When submersing oneself deeper into the stories, one can see the analogy between their wedded husbands, and the controlling grips they have on their wives....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Story of an Hour, Analysis]
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Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way. She would sometimes gather them passionately to her heart; she would sometimes forget them. The year before they had spent part of the summer with their grandmother Pontellier in Iberville. Feeling secure regarding their happiness and welfare, she did not miss them except with an occasional intense longing. Their absence was a sort of relief, though she did not admit this, even to herself....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 437 words
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Analysis of Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour - Back in 1894, the American writer Kate Chopin wrote the short-story "The Story of an Hour". Chopin, born O'Flaherty, wasn't renowned as a writer during her time, but she has achieved recognition in the 20th century especially with her 1899 novel "The Awakening". Her stories about strong women have really been paid attention to in relation to this century's sexual liberation debate. This short-story revolves around what goes through a person's head when informed that a close family member has perished....   [tags: Kate Chopin Story Hour] 1331 words
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The Importance of Human Intimacy in Chopin's Regret - The Importance of Human Intimacy in Chopin's Regret      The short story, "Regret," by Kate Chopin is about a childless spinster who accepts the responsibility of caring for a neighbor's four young children while their mother is away. The main idea of the story is that even though independent people like Mamzelle Aur'elie become used to living alone, they still need affection and human intimacy.   Mamzelle Aur'elie is depicted as a woman with masculine traits and a somewhat military demeanor....   [tags: Chopin Regret Essays]
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Wolff’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening - Wolff’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening The critical case study to the novel establishes a definition of a type of critical response, and then gives as close an example that fits that mode of criticism—BORING. First, the book has these forms of criticism laid out contiguously, as if they occurred only spatially and not temporally. This flattened and skewed representation of critical approaches, taking an argument out of its context (an academic debate) and uses it as if it were a pedagogical tool....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 1174 words
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Freedom iin Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Finding Freedom in The Awakening In her novel, The Awakening, Kate Chopin shows Edna Pontellier¹s confrontations with society, her imprisonment in marriage and Edna¹s exploration of her own sexuality. Chopin also portrays Edna as a rebel, who after her experiences at Grand Isle wants to live a full and a free life and not to follow the rules of society. Edna¹s life ends in her suicide, but her death does not come as a surprise. Chopin foreshadows Edna¹s death by the use of nature and Edna¹s connection to it; also by the use of symbols, especially the symbolic meaning of a bird; and by the use of many different characters in the novel, such as Robert Lebrun, Mademoiselle Reisz and Madame R...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 759 words
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