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Humor in Chaucer's The Miller's Tale - Humor in Chaucer's The Miller's Tale Chaucer's "The Miller's Tale" should be tragic, because a lot of horrible things happen to the characters. The carpenter's wife is disloyal to him, sleeping with others and making fun of him with Nicholas. Also, he is depicted as a fool. However, readers get a humorous feeling from the story, rather than feeling sorry for the carpenter's unfair life....   [tags: World Literature Chaucer Miller Tale Essays]
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645 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Knight and the Miller Portrayed by Chaucer - The Knight and the Miller Portrayed by Chaucer society. The Knight would be an educated member of society, whereas the Miller would be nearer the bottom of the social spectrum. The type of education each would have had is reflected in the language Chaucer uses in each portrait. In the Knights prologue Chaucer uses longer words and longer sentences. Chaucer lists all the battles the Knights has been in, and the long sentences used help to show the reader that the Knight is educated. In the Millers prologue shorter sentences and shorter words are used which infers that the Miller is uneducated....   [tags: Knight Miller Chaucer Essays] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
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Summary and Analysis of The Miller's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Miller's Tale When the Knight had finished, everybody decided that he had told a noble story. The drunken Miller claims that he has a tale as noble as the one the Knight had told. The host tried to quiet the Miller, but he demanded to speak. He claims that he will tell the tale of a carpenter and his wife. His tale will be one of infidelity. The narrator attempts to apologize for the tale that will follow, admitting that the Miller is not well-bred and will therefore tell a bawdy tale....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Miller's Tale Essays] 1357 words
(3.9 pages)
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Biblical Allusions in The Shipman's Tale - The Canterbury Tales, - Biblical Allusions in The Shipman’s Tale There is no doubting Chaucer’s mastery at paroemia; that his adaptations of his many and varied sources transcended their roots is attested by the fact that, unlike many of his contemporaries or authorities, his works have not “passen as dooth a shadwe upon the wal”[1]. Yet while his skill as a medieval author is undisputed, the extent of his subtlety is not always fully appreciated. In The Canterbury Tales, for instance, while some tales were rapid in drawing academic interest and scholarly interpretations, others were quickly dismissed as ribald tales, as simple fabliaux hardly worthy of more than a cursory examination....   [tags: Chaucer Shipman's Tale Essays]
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3912 words
(11.2 pages)
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Importance of Order in Knight's Tale - The Importance of Order in Knight's Tale   Chaucer claims to place the Knight's Tale just after the General Prologue by chance, the drawing of lots. The Knight draws the short straw, and all are glad for it. The appropriateness of his lengthy tale to follow is clear on some levels, and barely perceptible on others. I intend to launch my investigation of the Knight's Tale with a scrutiny of these three statements, and perhaps we shall find an interesting conclusion in this, albeit a disputable one....   [tags: Chaucer Knight's Tale Essays]
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1804 words
(5.2 pages)
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Sexual and Bodily Subjects in The Miller's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer - "The Miller's Tale," a short story by Geoffrey Chaucer, deals frankly with sexual and bodily subjects. Chaucer is never obscene, he allows the reader to use his imagination to determine what some of the events actually mean. The tale is a "fabliau," which is a short story in verse that deals satiracally and humorously about sexual or monetary deception. When Chaucer describes the characters, he creates a unique theme for each person that helps the reader determine their role in the story. For example, he describes Alisoun as being a young, playful, and attractive girl that enjoys showing off what she has....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales] 581 words
(1.7 pages)
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Morals in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Morals in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales When Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales, he had certain morals in mind. Chaucer usually dealt with one of the seven ?deadly. sins as well. The humorous Miller?s Tale is no exception. The Story is about a carpenter who marries a young beautiful woman who is much younger than him. The moral of the story is revealed in the second paragraph, when Chaucer, through the voice of the miller, notes of the carpenter, ?Being ignorant, he did not know of Cato?s advice that a man should marry a woman similar to him?....   [tags: Papers Chaucer Miller's Tale Essays]
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748 words
(2.1 pages)
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Miller's Tale - Do you believe that Chaucer thinks courtly love provides a useful set of rules and behaviors to guide man and women in their relationship. By analyzing two of the major characters, Nicholas and Absalon, and their relative success in relationships, explain what you believe Chaucer is telling us about courtly love though this tale. The Miller's tale story is about two characters that were pursuing the attention and affection of the beautiful Alison who was married to John the carpenter. These characters were Nicholas and Absalon....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer] 1039 words
(3 pages)
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Chaucer's Miller's Tale as Low Tragedy - I found out why people laugh. They laugh because it hurts...because it is the only thing that can make it stop hurting. ---Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in Strange Land Chaucer's The Miller's Tale has been scrutinized in hundreds of ways throughout the centuries in many different ways. Every time it has been looked at it has been taken at its face value as a comedy due to the tone of the miller and it's stature as a fabliaux. I am going to take a different view of the piece, a view from the other side of the fence as it were....   [tags: European Literature] 1538 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Miller's Tale - The link between the Miller and the tale he tells is quite a close one; the tale is really a reflection of the character that relates it. We will attempt to prove it by examining the storie's genre, the way in which it is narrated, and its intended meaning. The Miller's tale is a fabliau, a genre best defined as "a dirty story told with wit and point"; the tale itself is one of "old age, youth, carpentry and cuckoldry.". A character telling such a story can immediately be classified as a member of a low social class and gifted with a vulgar sense of humour, but not deprived of cleverness....   [tags: Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer] 517 words
(1.5 pages)
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Chaucer - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales demonstrate many different attitudes toward and perceptions of marriage. Some of these ideas are more liberal thought such as the marriages portrayed in the Wife of Bath, the Clerk’s and Merchant’s Tales. Then there are those tales that are very traditional, such as that discussed in the Franklin's and the Squire’s tales. And lastly there is a tales of that of the Friar and the Summoner which aren’t really involved with marriage but are in the middle of the marriage group to show the fighting between two men and to prove the Wife of bath right....   [tags: essays research papers] 2642 words
(7.5 pages)
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Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales Critics interpreting Chaucerian depictions of drunkenness have traditionally focused on the state as an unalloyed vice, citing variously as justification the poet’s Christian conservatism, his intimate association with the disreputable London vintner community, and even possible firsthand familiarity with alcoholism. While we must always remain vigilant to the evils of excessive inebriation, to portray Chaucer’s images of drink and revelry in The Canterbury Tales as an unqualified denunciation is to oversimplify the poet’s work and to profane his art....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales Essays] 3290 words
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Contradictions in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Contradictions in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales There is no question that contradictory values make up a major component of The Canterbury Tales. Fate vs. Fortuna, knowledge vs. experience and love vs. hate all embody Chaucer's famous work. These contrasting themes are an integral part of the complexity and sophistication of the book, as they provide for an ironic dichotomy to the creative plot development and undermine the superficial assumptions that might be made. The combination of completely contradictory motifs leads to the unusual stories and outcomes that come to play out in the tales....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales Essays]
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3890 words
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Chaucer's Parody To Courtly Love - Chaucer's Parody To Courtly Love After the Knight tells his story, the Miller insists very rudely to tell his tale. Chaucer uses the aspect of courtly love which is found in the Knights tale and makes a parody of it; He uses the Miller?s character to mock the Knights idea of courtly love. Miller describes the heroine of his story Alison, as a wife of an older man and also an infidel. She?s compared to a ?wezele. sly and cunning. The description of Alison clearly indicates that she is very different from an innocent girl from courtly love stories instead she?s well aware of her husbands jealousy and wears elaborate cloths to show off her beauty....   [tags: English Literature Chaucer Essays Papers] 553 words
(1.6 pages)
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Discuss Chaucer's comic method in the Miller's Prologue and Tale - Discuss Chaucer's comic method in the Miller's Prologue and Tale. Combine your personal response with reference to other critical opinion at relevent points in your argument. The Miller's Tale is undoubtedly Chaucer's most crude and vulgar work, but how far did Chaucer intend for there to be a moral to his story. Are we supposed to sympathise with the jealous but 'sely' carpenter when the wife whom 'he lovede moore than his lyf' is unfaithful to him. Should we take pity on Absolon when his 'love-longynge' leads him to the riotous 'misplaced kiss'....   [tags: English Literature] 2311 words
(6.6 pages)
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Attitudes Towards Love in The Miller's Tale by Chaucer - Throughout The Miller’s Tale, Chaucer is exploring a variety of attitudes towards love Love, marriage and Courtly love =============================== Courtly love is ‘a tradition represented in Western European literature between the 12th and 14th centuries, idealising love between a knight and a revered (usually married) lady’. Courtly love was a code of behaviour that was made popular through Romance literature. This term later evolved to include any tales of knights, chivalry and courtly love....   [tags: English Literature] 365 words
(1 pages)
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The Miller's Tale - The Miller's Tale The Miller’s Tale is in the form of fabliaux, which is part of the oral tradition of storytelling, which was very popular among the lower classes in the medieval times. Prominently bawdy and satirizing in content, fabliaux commonly told the story of a bourgeois husband who is cuckolded by his young wife. Fabliaux brings a great contrast to the likes of the courtly love tales such as the Knight’s Tale, thus it reflects Chaucer’s social and literary experience....   [tags: Papers Fabliaux Storytelling] 1113 words
(3.2 pages)
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An Analysis of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - An Analysis of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer is a collection of stories that are recited by different pilgrims who are on their way to St. Thomas's tomb in Canterbury. On their way they decide to hold a contest that would judge the best tale out of the ones recited by the different characters. The tales help the characters pass the time and entertain themselves. The different characters are from different walks of life and have very different personalities....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer Canterbury Tales ] 1590 words
(4.5 pages)
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Passive Women in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales? - Passive Women in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. One argument that reigns supreme when considering Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales is whether or not there is an element of anti-feminism within the text. One thread that goes along with this is whether or not the women of The Canterbury Tales are passive within the tales told. This essay will explore the idea that the women found within the tales told by the pilgrims (The Knight’s Tale, The Miller’s Tale and The Wife of Bath’s Tale to name a few) are not passive at all, but rather influence the turn of events within the stories....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales Women Essays]
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1476 words
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Perceptions of Marriage in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Perceptions of Marriage in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales       Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales demonstrate many different attitudes toward and perceptions of marriage.  Some of these ideas are very traditional, such as that discussed in the Franklin's Tale, and others are more liberal such as the marriages portrayed in the Miller's and the Wife of Bath's Tales.  While several of these tales are rather comical, they do indeed give us a representation of the attitudes toward marriage at that time in history....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays Chaucer Papers]
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1430 words
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Suppression and Silence in The Reeve’s Tale - Suppression and Silence in The Reeve’s Tale   Such comments as, “I pray to God his nekke mote to-breke” quickly reveal that the ver-bal game of “quite” involves much more than a free meal to the Reeve in “The Canterbury Tales” (I 3918). This overreaction, which grabs the attention of the audience and gives it pause, is characteristic of the Reeve’s ostensibly odd behavior, being given to morose speeches followed by violent outbursts, all the while harboring spiteful desires. Anger typifies the Reeve’s dialogue and his tale, which begs the question why....   [tags: Reeves Tale Essays] 3047 words
(8.7 pages)
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Comparing Clothing in Knight's Tale and the Miller's Tale - One of the striking differences between the Knyghts Tale and the Millers Tale (which is supposed to "quit(e)" the Knyghts Tale) is that of clothing (the former tale) and lack of clothing (in the latter). Upon an inspection of the General Prologue's description of the Knyght, I found that clothing is a very signifcant part of the Knyght's Tale. Chaucer's decription of him may forshadow (or, since Chaucer wrote the tales after they were told, color his perceptions of the Knyght) the importance of clothing in the Knyght's Tale....   [tags: Chaucer, Canterbury Tales]
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2552 words
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Chaucer's Portrayal Of Women in Canterbury Tales - All through Canterbury Tales, women are dealt with as objects in everyday life. In the “Miller’s Tale,” an old man marries a younger, attractive women for her looks. In the “Wife of Bath’s Tale,” a virgin woman has her virginity and innocence taken from her by what is suppose to be a noble and honorable knight and when his punishment is later to marry an older, less attractive women, all respect for his newly wife vanishes. A woman’s level of recognition in Canterbury Tales are through her class in society, whether she is young and beautiful, or old and disgusting, and her degree of experience in life....   [tags: Women, Canterbury Tales, gender, Geoffrey Chaucer,] 902 words
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The Bourgeois Social Class in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Bourgeois Social Class in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Missing Work Cited Page It is clear that Geoffrey Chaucer was acutely aware of the strict classist system in which he lived; indeed the very subject matter of his Canterbury Tales (CT) is a commentary on this system: its shortcomings and its benefits regarding English society. In fact, Chaucer is particularly adept at portraying each of his pilgrims as an example of various strata within 14th century English society. And upon first reading the CT, one might mistake Chaucer's acute social awareness and insightful characterizations as accurate portrayals of British society in the late 1300s and early 1400s....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales] 5134 words
(14.7 pages)
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How Secrecy is Presented in The Millers Tale - How Secrecy is Presented in The Miller’s Tale Secrecy is a prominent theme in The Miller’s Tale and Chaucer uses it to not only make the tale more interesting but also to give the characters more depth, or in the case of Alison less depth. The way that secrecy is presented and what effects it has will be discussed. Chaucer introduces the reader to secrecy at the beginning of the tale in The Miller’s Prologue, indicating its importance, ‘An housbande shal not been inqusitif of Goddes privetee,’ and this immediately makes the reader assume that at least one of the characters will in fact be inquisitive of ‘Goddes privetee’ and that there will be secrets in The Miller’s Tale....   [tags: The Millers Tale Geoffrey Chaucer Essays] 690 words
(2 pages)
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The Miller's Prologue and Tale - The Miller's Prologue and Tale is a humorous story about a love triangle of three men and one woman. The tale has many intriguing parts but the most important theme is that of loyalty. In the beginning of the tale, the carpenter, John, talks about his wife, how she is so much younger then him and how he is a very jealous man: "This carpenter hadde wedded a newe a wif / Which that he loved more than his lif. / Of eighteteen yeer she was of age; / Jalous he was wilde and yong, and he was old / And deemed himself been lik a cokewold" (113)....   [tags: The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer] 802 words
(2.3 pages)
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How does Chaucer present love in The Miller’s Tale - How does Chaucer present love in The Miller’s Tale In ‘The Miller’s Tale’ there are three different types of ‘love’ that Chaucer presents, and he also presents them in different ways, but manages to convey the emotions had by the character whilst entertaining the reader adding to the fabliau essence of the tale. The relationship between John and Alison is presented in an interesting way. The ‘love’ that one has for the other is very different; John cares deeply for her and is very much in love with this young girl and this is shown in his intense jealousy ‘Jalous he was, and heeled hire narwe in cage’ whilst Alison’s feelings for John seem to be less dedicated....   [tags: English Literature] 655 words
(1.9 pages)
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Miller’s Tale and the Life of Christ - The Miller’s Tale and the Life of Christ        When Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales, he created a great majority of the individual tales by "borrowing" and reworking material from various sources. Most of these stories would have been very familiar to his medieval audience, and the changes he made in the standard version of these tales for his work would have been a form of tacit communication that would have added an extra dimension to each of them. Howard says that "... the tales possess a relatedness of their own within a world of other texts....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1912 words
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The Characters in the Millers Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer - The Characters in the Millers Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer During the middle ages, religion was the matrix of a person’s life. Everything, even boiling an egg, depended on religion, for the egg was cooked when the prayer was finished. With religion came certain morals and ideals that even now are associated with Christianity. A person was viewed based on how he measured up to the ideals of his profession or position in life. This was mostly proven in the satiric tone that Geoffrey Chaucer chooses to give to the narrator, in the Prologue, when describing such corrupt characters as the Monk and the Pardoner....   [tags: Papers] 472 words
(1.3 pages)
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Foreshadowing "The Miller's Tale" - Foreshadowing the Miller's Tale In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Chaucer the author and Chaucer the pilgrim are both quick to make distinctions between characters and point out shortcomings. Though Chaucer the pilgrim is meeting the group for the first time, his characterizations go beyond simple physical descriptions. Using just twenty-one lines in the General Prologue, the author presents the character of the Miller and offers descriptions that foreshadow the sardonic tone of his tale and the mischievous nature of his protagonist....   [tags: European Literature] 559 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Miller Inside and Out - ... When “handy Nicholas” first encounters Alison, he “[catches] her between the legs” and woos her, and they devise a plan to sleep with each other secretly (1721). This lecherous scheme fuels the entire plot of the tale. However, the parish clerk Absolom with his “gray eyes” and “nightingale” nature, typical attributes of lusty men, attempts to win Alison’s heart (1722, 1723). Although Absolom utilizes every method to win Alison’s heart even chewing “licorice and cardamom,” he ends up kissing her “bare bum” whereas Nicholas sleeps with her (1729, 1730)....   [tags: Character Analysis, Miller, Alison] 779 words
(2.2 pages)
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Juxtaposition in "The Miller's Tale" - The Juxtaposition of the sacred and the erotic is typical of the miller's style of story telling. With reference to the extract (lines 540-548), discuss the narrative technique employed in this tale The Miller has employed the technique of the juxtaposition of the sacred and erotic in this tale for effect as it is offensive yet humorous and entertaining. Juxtaposition is the combining of two different improbable ideas next to each other which is used to generate great contrast and shock, thus it makes this technique very successful....   [tags: European Literature] 788 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Miller - The Miller The Miller is not in the tale, but is as vivid a creation of Chaucer as characters that are. The Knight presents us with an ideal to which he probably aspires; the Miller presents us with the real everyday world. While the Knight stresses the nature of romantic love, the Miller considers love in sexual terms. Neither view alone is wholly true. Each is a corrective to the other: love embraces both of these elements. This paper will describe The Miller’s characteristics, his humor, his education level, and his habits....   [tags: essays research papers] 777 words
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Pornography in The Miller's Tale - ... Yes, of course there were bits and pieces of sexual relations and activity, but not the point where it caused sexual arousal. The narrator asked forgiveness from the reader in advance for the tale’s bawdiness and warns those who are unquestionably offended to pass up to another tale. Of course this story does deal with a lot of sexual situations, but Chaucer twisted with humor and bawdy. Therefore, the reader would have a better understanding of the story. The majority of this story surrounded on the subject of sex: who, where, how, and the consequences that go along with it....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1177 words
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Dialectal Awareness in the Reeve's Tale - Dialectal Awareness in the Reeve's Tale Throughout any given period of human history, language has been the highest expression of observable and transmissible culture. Individuals generally affiliate themselves with those of like culture and characteristics and tend to shun those who express qualities and beliefs that are different from what is commonly accepted or familiar. Wedges are often driven in the midst of identical groups of people with common beliefs, simply because one particular dialect of their language is strange to the ear of another group, or is difficult for that other group to understand ....   [tags: Reeves Tale Essays]
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The Miller's Tale: Differentiation of Sex - The Miller's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer is a mirror of medieval society particularly in the way it depicts the relationships between men and women as well as giving a realistic portrait of working class people during the middle ages. Alison, the main character illustrates how a woman was able to use her sex through her actions of deceit to many characters. Popular belief holds that courtly love was prevalent during the medieval period; however The Miller's Tale provides a more realistic look into sexual relationships through its use of infidelity and sexual humor....   [tags: World Literature] 1055 words
(3 pages)
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Comparing the Miller's Tale and the Reeve's Tale - Comparing the Miller's Tale and the Reeve's Tale In the conclusion between the Miller's Tale and the Reeve's Tale, the Reeve's Tale is far more insulting and malicious and convincingly closer to the true definition of quiting, then the Miller's Tale. The Reeve's Tale defines what trickery and evildoing and cuckolding is. The Miller's Tale is more of a tale dealing with a form of black 'humor and slapstick comedy, rather than a succession of put-downs which occurred in the Reeve's Tale....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 512 words
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Anti-Feminist Beliefs in Miller's Tale and Wife of Bath's Tale - Anti-Feminist Beliefs in The Miller's Tale and The Wife of Bath's Tale   The Miller's Tale and The Wife of Bath's Tale feature two characters that, though they may appear to be different, are actually very similar. They both seem to confirm the anti-feminine beliefs that existed at the time Chaucer wrote his Canterbury Tales. However, they go about it in different ways. Alison, the woman in The Miller's Tale, tries to hide the fact that she has a passion for men other than her husband, and keep her position as an upstanding citizen intact....   [tags: Feminism Feminist Women Criticism]
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Canterbury Tales - Comparison of the Miller's Tale and the Knight's Tale - A Comparison of the Miller's Tale and the Knight's Tale        It is common when considering The Canterbury Tales to discuss how some tales seem designed to emphasise the themes of others. Two such tales are the Miller's Tale2 and the Knight's Tale3. At first glance these two tales seem an incongruous pairing. The Knight's Tale is told by an eminent person, is an historical romance which barely escapes a tragic ending, and its themes are universal: the relationship of individuals to providence, fortune and free will....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Geoffrey Chaucer - Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London, the son of a successful wine merchant. After probably spending many of his childhood days in London's Vintry, his father did not send him to apprenticeship school, but rather to the aristocratic house of the countess of Ulster. There he trained as a page and learned the mannerisms and skills of the ruling class. "After that in1359-60 Chaucer serves in the war in France.1360 Chaucer, captured by the French, is ransomed (for 16 pounds)." (Benson, L.D pg 1).Chaucer then married Philippa Roet in 1366....   [tags: Biography] 1162 words
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A Comparison of Telling in Knight’s Tale and Miller’s Tale of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Importance of Telling in Knight’s Tale and Miller’s Tale In the Canterbury Tales, the Knight begins the tale-telling. Although straws were picked, and the order left to "aventure," or "cas," Harry Bailey seems to have pushed fate. The Knight represents the highest caste in the social hierarchy of the fourteenth century, those who rule, those who pray, and those who work. Assuming that the worldly knight would tell the most entertaining and understandable story (that would shorten their pilgrimage to St....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 918 words
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Character of the Reeve - The Character of the Reeve in Canterbury Tales In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer’s descriptive technique used to present the Reeve emphasized his physical characteristics as well as the success he attained in his occupation. It is evident that Chaucer gives two different perceptions of the Reeve, one perception is of his physical makeup and the other is of his success achieved in his occupation. In Chaucer’s introduction of the Reeve, he immediately begins with the Reeve’s physical makeup, as shown in this excerpt from The Canterbury Tales: “His beerd was shave as neigh as evere he can; His heer was by his eres ful round yshorn; His top was dokked lik a preest biforn; Ful longe were his legges and ful lene, Ylik a staf, ther was no calf yseene (590-594).” This excerpt shows the attention to detail Chaucer selected to introduce the Reeve....   [tags: Reeves Tale Essays] 828 words
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How Does Chaucer Present The Miller To Become Such A Vivid And Vibrant - How Does Chaucer Present The Miller To Become Such A Vivid And Vibrant Character. ‘The Canterbury Tales’ is a selection of stories written in Middle English. On a spring day in April sometime in the 14th century 29 pilgrims (including Chaucer as a character 30) set out for Canterbury on a pilgrimage. Among them is a knight, a monk, a prioress, two nun’s, the friar, the squire, the yeoman, the merchant, a clerk, a sergeant of the law, a wealthy landowner, a doctor, the wife of Bath, a supplier, the reeve, a somonour, a pardoner, Harry Bailey (the host), Chaucer himself, a haberdasher, a carpenter, a weaver, a tapestry maker, a dyere, a cook, a shipman, a poor parson, a plowman, and a miller....   [tags: English Literature] 2585 words
(7.4 pages)
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The Comedy of Chaucer's Fabliaux - In a significant number of his tales Chaucer uses the comic genre of fabliaux, which are short, typically anti-intellectual, indecent tales of bourgeois or low life. The plot usually involves an older husband who is cuckholded by a younger man whom (often) the older man has himself brought into the house, and his often younger wife. The Miller, the Reve, the Merchant and the Wife of Bath all tell tales which are essentially amoral - in fitting with the genre; tales which would not have been acceptable had they been written in an aristocratic setting, but which were accepted as suitable depictions of lower class life....   [tags: European Literature] 1954 words
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Immorality in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - ... The young side of the immaturity dealing with marriages is that of the young groom wishing each day away quickly to get to the sex faster; similarly, the older side of this spectrum is the older man wishing the same way but only with a young girl (Rogers: 2, 385). All this is lusting is acceptable inside a marriage, but when lusting ventures outside the marriage then it becomes extremely immoral. Nicholas and Damian are two characters in “The Miller’s Tale,” and “The Merchant’s Tale” these two young men work in the houses of John and January as trusted servants and therefore have an easy access to trickery with their younger maidens....   [tags: Literature]
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Chaucer,Boccaccio,and the debate of love - N.S. Thompson, Chaucer, Boccaccio, and the Debate of Love: A Comparative Study of The Decameron and The Canterbury Tales. Oxford: Clarendon, 1996; 354pp.; Nigel Thompson's book resists alignment with current concerns in late-medieval studies: he has little or nothing to say about manuscripts and their dissemination; about the audiences, reception, and imitation of the works he treats; about gender and its representation; about contemporary social and political developments and how these works reflect and even affect them; or about nationalism and internationalism in both late-medieval writers and the twentieth-century study of their work....   [tags: essays research papers] 1368 words
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Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Sit and Spin: Chaucer’s social commentary grows from so-called "intrusion" The relationship Geoffrey Chaucer establishes between "outsiders" and "insiders" in The Canterbury Tales provides the primary fuel for the poetry’s social commentary. Both tales and moments within tales describing instances of intrusion work to create a sense of proper order disturbed in the imaginary, structured universes presented by the pilgrims. The perturbances, conflicts born of these examples of, "intrusion into the inner circle," bear the responsibility for most of the ironic-comedic role reversal on which the Tales thrive....   [tags: essays research papers] 1734 words
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Chaucer and the Humor of the Canterbury Tales - My presentation is based an article titled The Inhibited and the Uninhibited: Ironic Structure in the Miller’s Tale it s written by Earle Birney. The literary theme that Birney is discussing in his essay is structural irony. Structural irony is basically a series of ironic events and instances that finally build up to create a climax. The events and the climax the Birney chooses to focus his essay on are the events that lead towards the end when almost each character suffers an ironic event: Absolon: kisses Alisoun’s backside Nicholas: gets his backside burned John: falls from the tub and breaks his arm Ironic events and play on words were used to lead to this ironic climax....   [tags: essays research papers] 523 words
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Retribution in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Retribution in The Canterbury Tales Retribution is essential to a balanced humanity, acting as an offset for immoral deeds. Although retribution remains a necessary part of existence, it can be circumvented through penance, as exemplified in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. Upon entering the process of penance, the sinner must take the initial step and feel repentance for their immoral actions. However, without contrition, avoidance of punishment can only be achieved through a display cunning maneuvering, which then acts as redemption....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays] 938 words
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What is the importance of the description of Alison in the Context of the Miller?s Prologue and Tale? - In “The Miller’s Tale”, the poet Chaucer depicts the tale of a “hende” man and his attempt to tempt the “primerole” Alisoun to commit adultery and therefore render her husband, John a “cokewold”. The Miller’s Tale is just one story amongst a collection of greater works known collectively as “The Canterbury Tales”. The placing of this tale is significant becomes it comes directly after the Knight’s Tale revolving around nobility and chivalry and forms a direct contrast due to the fact it is bawdy, lewd and highly inappropriate....   [tags: essays research papers] 812 words
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The Significance of Women in Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales - The Significance of Women in Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales        In Geoffrey Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales, many stories are told leading to a wide range of topics.  One particular and significant topic Chaucer touches on many times is the role of women.  In stories such as The Millers Tale, The Knight's Tale, and the Wife of Bath's Tale the women of each story are portrayed extremely different.  Alisoun, Emelye, and the wife of Bath, each exemplify three dissimilar ways in which women love.  The way Chaucer describes each of these characters is dependent on the out come of each particular story.  Chaucer is careful with his word choice and figurative language with each woman, enabling the reader to get a very visual and sometimes humorous picture....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
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Themes in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer - Themes in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer Throughout an author’s literature, many times we find common themes; this is definitely true in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. In the literary work, the reader can find common themes through many of the tales. In the Wife of Bath tale, The Miller’s tale, and the Pardoner’s tale, it is easy to see that one of the main themes through the book is that women are the downfall of men. Although this may not have been Chaucer’s personal feeling, he gives ample proof to prove this statement through his characters and their stories....   [tags: Papers] 441 words
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Re-read the Ending of the Miller's Tale. How Far Do You Consider It to Be a Satisfying Conclusion? - Following its fast, action-packed pace, "The Miller's Tale" climaxes with a series of causes and effects and ends rather abruptly with Chaucer's short summary on the sequence of events. On one hand the brusque ending of "The Miller's tale" is appropriate to the nature of The Miller himself, we know him to be a drunk, rude man who, "abide no man for his curtsies," and this ending seems to reflect that behaviour. However on the other hand, as the reader, do we feel "The Miller's Tale," is missing an imperative moral....   [tags: European Literature] 611 words
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Essay on Gentilesse for the Masses in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Gentilesse for the Masses in General Prologue and The Canterbury Tales       In the 14th century, class distinction was of great importance. The class to which one belonged determined the clothes one was allowed to wear, the color of that clothing and even behavior. In Geoffrey Chaucer's General Prologue and The Canterbury Tales , we can find any number of characters with these behavior distinctions if we examine them. The Knight, for example, is described as a worthy man of "trouthe and honour, freedom and curtesie" (I, 46)....   [tags: Wife of Bath Essays]
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Essay - The Strong Wife of Bath - The Strong Wife of Bath     Alison of Bath as a battered wife may seem all wrong, but her fifth husband, Jankyn, did torment her and knock her down, if not out, deafening her somewhat in the process. Nevertheless, the Wife of Bath got the upper hand in this marriage as she had done in the other four and as she would probably do in the sixth, which she declared herself ready to welcome. Alison certainly ranks high among women able to gain control over their mates.   The Wife of Bath's personality, philosophy of sexuality, and attitude toward sovereignty in marriage obviously are offered as comedy....   [tags: Wife of Bath Essays]
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General Notes on Chaucer and the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales - General Notes on Chaucer and the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales Bifel that in that seson on a day, In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage, At nyght was come into that hostelrye Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle In felaweshipe, and pilgrimes were they alle, That toward Caunterbury wolden ryde. GP lI.20-27 In April Geoffrey Chaucer at the Tabard Inn in Southwerk, across the Thames from London, joins a group of pilgrims on their way to the Shrine of Thomas à Becket in Canterbury....   [tags: English Literature] 3342 words
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The Role of Quiting in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales - The Role of "Quiting" in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales   In Chaucer’s, The Canterbury Tales, many characters express the desire to "pay back" some other pilgrim for their tale. The function of "quiting" gives us insights into the ways in which Chaucer painted the social fabric of his world. The characters of the Knight, the Miller, and the Reeve, all seem to take part in a tournament of speech. The role of "quiting" in The Canterbury Tales serves to "allow the characters themselves to transcend their own social class, and class-based moral expectations, in order to gain power over people of "higher" social strata."(Hallissy 41) Throughout each prologue of the first three tales, we can see a clear description of the social rank of each speaker....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
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The Variety of Ways in Which Chaucer Treats the Subject of Love - Write an essay on the variety of ways in which Chaucer treats the subject of love. Within ten stories in the Canterbury Tales, men and women on the way to, or in marriage provide the ostensible subject, with six tales expounding largely on love and its counterpart in marriage. In comic tales, sexual activity is constantly relished, especially in the Miller’s Tale and the Reeve’s Tale, where love is defined and motivated by animalistic physical desire and relationships clouded with lies and deceit....   [tags: English Literature] 1435 words
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The Pardoner as Symbol in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales - The Pardoner as Symbol for the Pilgrims’ Unattainable Goals in Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer’s work, The Canterbury Tales, paints a portrait of medieval life through the voices and stories of a wide variety of speakers. The people on the Pilgrimage tell their stories for a wide range of reasons. Each Tale is told in order to accomplish two things. The Tales provoke their audience as much as they are a kind of self-reflection. These reactions range from humor, to extreme anger, to open admiration....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
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The Miller's Attempt to Quiet the Knight - In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales a storytelling competition is proposed by the Host. In his mind, it was only proper for the Knight to tell his story first. The sneaky Host rigged the drawing of straws and the Knight won the honor of going first. He told a Roman Epic of loyalty and love, set in classical antiquity that portrayed his gallant manner and elevated social class. The Miller's Tale, a parody of the Knight's Tale, came next. The Miller's Tale was more contemporary and left out many of the ideals that were displayed by the characters in the Knight's Tale....   [tags: American Literature] 1445 words
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Consider the ways in which the Miller presents John the Carpenter in - Consider the ways in which the Miller presents John the Carpenter in The Miller's Tale. In your answer you should pay particular attention; - Vocabulary and style - Form - Any other features of language you consider to be important John the Carpenter is a character who Chaucer uses to make an example of someone who is extremely gullible. To some extent, the nature of which he is gullible can often be unbelievable because some of the things he does are of a farcical nature; "Y-geten us thise kneeding-tubbes three, Than shaltou hang hem in the roof full hye" The Carpenter is a central character in the plot because he is the person who the majority of the 'jokes' and farces are based upon....   [tags: English Literature] 806 words
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The True Face of Lowbrow Humor - ... Moreover, Chaucer juxtaposes the Knight’s noble tale with the Miller’s lewd tale to reassert the Miller’s “low-born” perspective (1719). Verifying these expectations, the Miller intentionally calls Nicholas “hendë,” a word which means not only “ready to hand” but also a person who grasps women, since Nicholas “held [Alison] by the haunches,” an action which illustrates the Miller’s coarse nature (1721). The Miller’s application of wit is playful and for the purpose of entertainment. In calling his tale of lusty escapades “noble,” the Miller mocks the Knight’s tale of courtly love (1718)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, The Miller's Tale] 741 words
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Analysis Of 'The General Prologue' To The Canterbury Tales - Religion has long since been an important factor in society, changing and evolving throughout the centuries. In medieval Europe, religious pilgrimages were a crucial part of ones religious faith. Often every one in society, from the highest of class to the lowest order was involved in this practice. Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the most important writers in English literature, was the author of The Canterbury Tales, an elaborate poem about the religious pilgrimage of twenty nine people to Canterbury....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer] 1046 words
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The Canterbury Tales - The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales, a masterpiece of English Literature, written by Geoffrey Chaucer, is a collection, with frequent dramatic links, of 24 tales told to pass the time during a spring pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket in Canterbury. The General Prologue introduces the pilgrims, 29 "sondry folk" gathered at the Tabard Inn in Southwark (outside of London). Chaucer decides to join them, taking some time to describe each pilgrim. According to the Norton Anthology, "the composition of none of the tales can be accurately dated; most of them were written during the last fourteen years of Chaucer's life, although a few were probably written earlier and inserted into The Canterbury Tales" (Norton, 80)....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales Essays]
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Analogues of a Fabliau - Analogues of a Fabliau Geoffrey Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales in many different genres and from a variety of sources. He took ideas from other authors and made them his own through adding and changing details, which in turn could cause the meaning of the story to change. The adaptations could alter the tone of the story; it could be made more sarcastic, humorous or serious. He also wrote in many different genres. One genre that Chaucer worked with is the fabliau. A fabliau is a short story that is usually written in verse about low or middle class people....   [tags: Chaucer Canterbury Tales Fabliau Essays]
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Analyzing and Comparing The Canterbury Tales - In the Canterbury Tales , Chaucer reflects his views on society and the values he holds through his representation of his characters in the general prologue and in each of their tales. Chaucer beautifully portrays the values of poverty, chastity, obedience, chivalry and true love. How Chaucer uses the group of people to express and portray the image of what 12th century English society looked like, and how the society was back then .In the Canterbury tales, Chaucer creativity and humorously provides a cross-section of 12th century English society though the group of pilgrims....   [tags: chaucer, literary analysis, literary criticism] 789 words
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The True Face of Unethical Humor - ... Moreover, Chaucer’s juxtaposition of the Knight’s noble tale and the Miller’s appalling tale confirms the Miller’s “low-born” thinking (1719). Verifying these expectations, the Miller’s tale features many scandalous scenes of the “so graceful and so slime” Alison, who cheats on her husband, John, with his student, Nicholas (1720). The Miller intentionally calls Nicholas “hendë,” a word which implies not only “ready to hand” but also a person who grasps women, since Nicholas “held [Alison] by the haunches,” an action which illustrates the Miller’s ignoble nature and his physical inclinations (1721)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Miller] 865 words
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Milling the Wife's Bath - The characters of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales are very memorable. Chaucer's prologue introduces several characters. The Pardoner, Miller, and Wife of Bath stand out from the crowd. These characters are all unique in their own way. Chaucer describes the characters in full detail. The physical description he gives for each character actually foreshadows their attitudes, status, and personalities. The characters of The Canterbury Tales are very memorable because their character types can are universal....   [tags: European Literature] 783 words
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Essay on the Characters in The Canterbury Tales - The Purpose of the  Characters in The Canterbury Tales          The characters introduced in the General Prologue of The Canterbury Tales each represent a stereotype of a kind of person that Chaucer would have been familiar with in 14th Century England. Each character is unique, yet embodies many physical and behavioral traits that would have been common for someone in their profession. In preparing the reader for the tales, Chaucer first sets the mood by providing an overall idea of the type of character who is telling the tale, then allows that character to introduce themselves through a personal prologue and finally, the pilgrim tells their tale....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
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The Reeves Rebuttal - The Reeve's Rebuttal The Reeve of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales I portrayed in the first as “old and choleric and thin”(605), choleric meaning short-tempered and yellow. All of Chaucer’s descriptions of the pilgrims in his tales give an insight into and very well foreshadow the their tale to come, and the Reeve is of course no exception. His description continues, portraying him with a conservative and resolve appearance, and one of fierce authority. Clever, calculating, and ruthless seem to sum up his personality, an imposing persona in a weakening body....   [tags: essays research papers] 415 words
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Canterbury Tales Essay - ... Later in the story, Nicolas manages to convince the carpenter that there is going to be a massive flood and that he should hide. However this is all just a lie, which Nicolas is using to get the carpenter out of the way so he can be with Allison. Through the carpenter, it seems as if Chaucer is pointing out that men are generally gullible and easily fooled. The stereotyping continues when Absolon enters the story and attempts to woo the likes of Allison. Absolon is unsuccessful in his attempt to woo her however, and Allison tricks him by pretending to offer him a kiss when in reality she just puts her behind in his face....   [tags: English Literature ] 842 words
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Essay on Human Nature and The Canterbury Tales - Human Nature and The Canterbury Tales       When Geoffrey Chaucer undertook the writing of The Canterbury Tales, he had a long road ahead of him. He intended to tell two stories from each of thirty pilgrims on the way to Canterbury, and then two more from each pilgrim on the way back from Canterbury. Of these, he completed only twenty-four. However, in these tales, Chaucer depicts both the pilgrims and their stories with striking realism. In "The Nun's Priest's Tale," "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale," "The Friar's Tale," "The Reeve's Tale," and "The Cleric's Tale," Chaucer demonstrates his remarkable insight into human nature....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
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Canterbury Tales - Canterbury Tales Character Analysis Chaucer’s greatest work came after everything else. Canterbury tales was the last of his literary works. It followed such stories as Troilus and Creseyde. It is considered as one of the greatest works of literature during the English Middle Age. The ironic thing is that it wasn’t even finished the way Chaucer had intended it to. He had planned to have over a hundred tales, four for each pilgrim. He ended up with twenty-four, less than one for each pilgrim....   [tags: essays research papers] 927 words
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The Canterbury Tales versus The Decameron: Literary Kissing Cousins - ... The Decameron has ten tales told over ten days by the characters in the framing narrative, while The Canterbury Tales has each pilgrim tells a tale, though not every character gets the opportunity. The result is there are one hundred stories in The Decameron and The Canterbury Tales has twenty-four. There are many more comparisons and contrasts that can be made between the two works. Certain tales in each work parallel each other. Some of these are The Decameron's second tale of the first day and Chaucer's "The Prioress' Tale", the tenth tale of the second day in The Decameron and Chaucer's "The Miller's Tale, the fifth tale on the tenth day of The Decameron and Chaucer's "The Franklin's Tale", and finally the tenth tale on the tenth day of The Decameron and Chaucer's "The Clerk's Tale"....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Canterbury Tales Interpretive Essay - The Evil Side of Human Nature Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales became one of the first ever works that began to approach the standards of modern literature. It was probably one of the first books to offer the readers entertainment, and not just another set of boring morals. However, the morals, cleverly disguised, are present in almost every story. Besides, the book offers the descriptions of the most common aspects of the human nature. The books points out both the good and the bad qualities of the people, however, the most obvious descriptions are those of the sinful flaws of humans, such as greed and lust....   [tags: essays research papers] 628 words
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Literary Genres of Canterbury Tales - Within William Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, many familiar medieval literary genres may be found. A very common tale that Chaucer uses is the fabliau, which is best portrayed in "The Miller's Tale." Another comedic genre, the beast fable, creates a moral through the use of animals instead of humans. In the Nun's Priest's Tale, Chaucer uses this fable to great effect. A third type of tale, the Breton lays, uses "The Franklin's Tale" to bring out the nobility of love. All three of these tales bring comedy and structure to a somewhat corrupt and violent clash of characters in William Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales....   [tags: World Literature] 677 words
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Canterbury Tales, Franklins Ta - WHEN PIGS FLY!!. Throughout the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, participants of the pilgrimage tell stories to entertain one another. These stories, while amusing, tend to have an underlying message, one being the Franklin’s Tale. The Franklin’s Tale is the most moral tale that has been read. It is not told to make the other pilgrims laugh, rather to explain an extremely important lesson. Throughout life, people say many things that are meant to be taken with a grain of salt and not literally, like “Sure I’ll buy you a car….WHEN PIGS FLY!!!'; Well, what would happen if one day pigs did fly....   [tags: essays research papers] 2026 words
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Compare and contrast how the three male characters are presented to us - Compare and contrast how the three male characters are presented to us in The Millers Tale and consider their roles in the Fabliau. The three male characters in Chaucer’s ‘The Millers Tale’ present many of the classic themes in and genre ‘Fabliau’. In English literature there is only a small amount of these tales and half of those are Chaucer’s. While in French literature there are over 300 stories. Nicholas is presented at the start of the ‘tale’ as gentle (hende) shy and therefore trusted and experienced in passionate courtly love, we can tell from his appearance and description that he will be the stereotypical fabliau character who is ‘cunning’ and always ‘makes fun of’ the other more foolish characters....   [tags: English Literature] 906 words
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Characters in the General Prologue to "The Canterbury Tales" - The Canterbury Tales are essentially a Chaucerian satire; the author sets out to deliberately upset the social order present at the time and proceeds to mock the faults innate in the characters. Chaucer gives a compressed view of characters such as the Knight and the Monk; in their descriptions, a preview of the kind of stories we can expect from these people is given. Take for example the Miller; his physical description alleviates him as a thick brute with a filthy mouth that was `moost of sin and harlotries', sufficed to say that his tale is one of adultery and sinful behaviour....   [tags: European Literature] 1231 words
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Children's Versions of "The Cantebury Tales" - Being a work filled with an unprecedented “wealth of fascinating characters”, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales has been translated and retold in many versions over the years (Cohen 7-8). Unavoidably translations and retelling require choices made by writers and editors of how to represent things and what to include, which can easily change aspects of the original story. The most difficult retellings may be versions written for children as writers not only have to deal with modernizing the language but also simplifying stories which feature adult themes, including corruption of the church, sex, marriage, adultery, for a younger audience....   [tags: Classic English Literature] 1450 words
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