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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Cat’s Cradle"
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Human Fallibility Exposed in Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat's Cradle - Oscar Wilde, an acclaimed Irish Poet, novelist, dramatist and critic once aptly commented, “Men become old, but they never become good”. The philosophical aspect of this quote relies on the basis that human beings are inherently malevolent. Through his pessimistic perspective, Wilde clearly captures the ill-disposed mindset of mankind. Moreover, there are various deductive arguments that discredit the optimistic depiction of human nature. One of the prime examples can be found in Kurt Vonnegut’s literature....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle] 1029 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Masterpiece of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Masterpiece  of Cat's Cradle      Kurt Vonnegut,  critically acclaimed author  of several best-selling novels, uses  self-expression and psychological manipulation to  stress to the reader  his beliefs and ideas dispersed within  the context of Cat's  Cradle. From reading this  novel, one  might attribute  perplexity pondering over the plot  and general story  line of the  book. Cat's Cradle entangles  itself  in  many  interesting  changes of events; strange outlandish ideas and psychological "black holes" can be found with just the flip of a page....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
2161 words
(6.2 pages)
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The Satire of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Satire of Cat's Cradle       Cat's Cradle is, "Vonnegut's most highly praised novel. Filled with humor and unforgettable characters, this apocalyptic story tells of Earth's ultimate end, and presents a vision of the future that is both darkly fantastic and funny, as Vonnegut weaves a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness" (Barnes and Noble n.pag).  In Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut uses satire as a vehicle for threatened self-destruction when he designs the government of San Lorenzo.  In addition, the Bokonists practice of Boko-maru, and if the world is going to end in total self destruction and ruin, then people will die, no matter how good people are and what religion peop...   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1004 words
(2.9 pages)
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Crusaders of Truth in Cat's Cradle and Pi - Crusaders of Truth in Cat's Cradle and Pi       In our world, people are constantly searching for the truth, or answers for things that seem unexplainable. On a quest to make the uncertainties of life easier, or more reasonable, some people have invented tools such as religion, and deemed them truthful. People such as Felix Hoenikker from Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, and Max Cohen from Darren Aronofsky's film Pi, resist such inventions and see a different definition of truth, which is science....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1022 words
(2.9 pages)
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Use of Coincidence in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Use of Coincidence in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Most modern novelists avoid the use of coincidence as a plot device, and such use of coincidence is looked on as trite and cheap. This was not always the case, as novelists of yore, Charles Dickens is a great example, have been known to throw in a suspicious coincidence at the very climax of the book that ties up the plot nicely but leaves modern readers feeling betrayed and deceived. Perhaps due to more literate, sophisticated readers, or just the maturation of the novel form, writers no longer have the luxury of plot coincidence....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 385 words
(1.1 pages)
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Black Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Black Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle       The phrase Black Humor has the broad meaning of poking "fun at subjects considered deadly serious or even taboo by some"2. This definition is simple, and yet embodies an important idea that is often lost in more complex definitions: the idea that Black Humor can actually be "fun", and provoke laughter. This is not, of course, the only important aspect of the term, and I shall explore some of the other important defining features of Black Humor before moving on to discuss its use in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle3....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 12 Works Cited
3853 words
(11 pages)
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Postmodernist Features in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Postmodernist Features in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle is a book, which enables many points for literary discussions. One possible topic of them could be the postmodernist features in this book. In this examination Ihab Hassan's essay "Toward a Concept of Postmodernism" was used as a source of secondary literature for defining of postmodernist features. The most visible and prevalent features are postmodernist metonymy, treatment of the character, dynamic tension, anarchy and a postmodernist look at religion as a whole....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 8 Works Cited
2895 words
(8.3 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Paradoxical Nature of Life Exposed in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut's apocalyptic novel, Cat's Cradle, might well be called an intricate network of paradox and irony. It is with such irony and paradox that Vonnegut himself describes his work as "poisoning minds with humanity...to encourage them to make a better world" (The Vonnegut Statement 107). In Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut does not tie his co-mingled plots into easy to digest bites as the short chapter structure of his story implies....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 424 words
(1.2 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle vs Our Assumptions Regarding War, Progress, and Religion If one of Vonnegut's purposes for writing is "to poison minds with humanity" (qtd. by Scholes, per Griffin), then the weapon of choice in Cat's Cradle, is satire. Cat's Cradle "poison[s] minds" only by revealing the toxins that are already present in the system. Vonnegut's brand of satire serves as a sort of syrup of ipecac on human folly, and if we are "to make a better world" as he would have it, we should understand how truly virulent human enterprise can be....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 384 words
(1.1 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Vonnegut deals a lot with fantasy in his book, Cat's Cradle. From the beginning, he talks about the religion that he follows: Bokonism. This is not a real religion, however he has rules, songs, scriptures, and opinions of a person that practices this fantasy religion. Within his description of this religion however is black humor as well. I think that by him making up this whole religion and an entire island of people who follow it, is in a way mocking today's religion and the way that people are dedicated to their beliefs....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 374 words
(1.1 pages)
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Satire, and Black Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire, and Black Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut was written in 1963. "It is a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness" (back cover). It is a book that counters almost every aspect of our society. As well as satire, Vonnegut also includes apocalyptic elements in this novel. Satire, "the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice or folly" (Webster 1193), is very prevalent in Cat's Cradle. Vonnegut hits on many aspects of human life with this satire....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 698 words
(2 pages)
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The Cruel Joke of Life Exposed in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Cruel "joke" of Life Exposed in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle is set up like a series of comic strips, with satirical commentary found in the last "panel". What, then, could we conclude is the accumulative punchline for the entire novel. What does Vonnegut give us for his "last laugh". If we attempt to answer this question, we must first try solving the answers to "what is the joke?" and "who is the joker?" It seems Vonnegut's characters are the victims to the cruel "joke" of life....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 368 words
(1.1 pages)
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Vonnegut's Simple Style in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Simple Style in Cat's Cradle The simple style with which Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. writes his novels belies the complexity hidden behind his sentences. Vonnegut's novels, as a result, are amazingly easy and, to many, enjoyable to read, yet they contain messages that go to the very root of humanity, messages that are not hidden underneath flowery prose. The success of Cat's Cradle, like all of his novels, relies on this simplicity to reveal its messages about religion, death, and apocalypse to the reader....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays] 1227 words
(3.5 pages)
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Satire and Fantasy in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire and Fantasy in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle For this essay, I decided to pick two terms that describe Cat's Cradle. I felt that satire and fantasy were two terms that suited the novel quite well. The book qualifies as a satire because it makes a mockery of things that were of concern in the sixties. For example, the Cuban missile crisis was a big issue in the early sixties. Religion was taken much more seriously, and the family unit was more tightly wound. In the novel, the threat comes not from a large warhead, but from a small crystal of Ice-nine....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 792 words
(2.3 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle: Exposing the Folly of Humanity - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle: Exposing the Folly of Humanity In an interview published in The Vonnegut Statement, Kurt Vonnegut states that one of his reasons for writing is "to poison minds with humanity. . . to encourage them to make a better world"(107). He uses poison, not in the context of a harmful substance, but as an idea that threatens welfare or happiness. In Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut strives to disturb the complacency of his readers by satirizing humanity and its institutions, such as religion, science, and war, to name a few....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 471 words
(1.3 pages)
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Cat's Cradle - The Human Vaccination Modern medicine has proved that the best way to prevent the contraction of a disease for humans is to inject a tolerable amount of the virus into the host and let the individual's immune system build a defense capable of withstanding future invasions of the same strand. The small pox vaccination, for example, has eliminated the disease from almost every nation on Earth. But what if the disease is psychological, a way of being or state of mind rather than a physical aberration....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Vonnegut Essays] 914 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Role of Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Role of Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle "I've narrowed comedy down to two words: clown and farts. Because first it makes you laugh, and then it makes you think." Dave Attell's joke comes remarkably close to describing exactly what it is that Kurt Vonnegut is able to do with his writing. First, he makes his readers laugh, and then he forces them to think. By employing such humorous devices as irony and satire, Vonnegut is able to bring humor to a less-than-humorous subject....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays] 631 words
(1.8 pages)
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Understanding Religion Through Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Understanding Religion Through Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle The following is issued as a warning from the author Kurt Vonnegut to the reader: "Any one unable to understand how a useful religion can be founded on lies will not understand this book either"(14). The latter quote is typical of Vonnegut in his usage of creating a personal narrative. Kurt Vonnegut Jr. was born in Indianapolis, like many of his characters, in 1922. His life from that point on closely resembles the lives of the people in his satirical novel Cat's Cradle....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
3194 words
(9.1 pages)
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Vonnegut's Nihilistic Views Exposed in Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Nihilistic Views Exposed in Cat's Cradle If humans strive to fulfill their void, of a lack of meaning in their lives, their folly will blind them from the truth. Kurt Vonnegut portrays his inner emotions and feelings of the insignificance of religion through the characters of his novel, Cat's Cradle. His satiric approach to a subject that many people base their daily existence upon, challenges the readers faith. As people search for a deeper meaning in their lives, the more confused they become....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1181 words
(3.4 pages)
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Effective Use of Irony and Satire in Cat's Cradle - Effective Use of Irony and Satire in Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut is a satire on the state of world affairs in the 1960's. Vonnegut made a commentary in this book on the tendency of humans to be warlike, belligerent, and shortsighted. The main character of the book, the narrator, is certainly not a protagonist, although the modern reader craves a hero in every story and the narrator in this one is the most likely candidate. Through the narrator's eyes, Vonnegut created a story of black humor ending in the destruction of the earth....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
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Satire, Surrealism and Dark Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire, Surrealism and Dark Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle "And there on the shaft in letters six inches high, so help me God, was the word: Mother" (48) "'If that's mother,' said the driver, 'what in hell could they have raised over father?'" As the reader soon finds out, 40 cm of marble, as directed by Felix Hoenikker's will, that says "FATHER" (49). Vonnegut stops you short and plucks at your hand like a little boy who has just shaved the cat and can't wait to show you what he's done: you can't, as a responsible adult, laugh at the absurdity of the bald and shivering feline because you know that you should be astonished, offended, annoyed, anything but burst out laughing, which yo...   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
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Use of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Use of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut said in The Vonnegut Statement (1973), in an interview with Robert Scholes, that one of his reasons for writing is "to poison minds with humanity…to encourage them to make a better world" (107). This idea works quite well in Vonnegut's book, Cat's Cradle. It is a satirical story of a man's quest to write a book about the day the world ended (refering to the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima), which he never finishes. What we get is a raw look at humans trying desperately to find a sense of purpose in their lives through different means such as religion, science, etc....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
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Satire and Surrealism in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire and Surrealism in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle In 1963, Kurt Vonnegut published his second novel Cat's Cradle. It is a distressing yet satirical critique of our society and the surrealistic end that is its destiny. Through his use of irony and sarcasm he attacks and exposes society's flaws while questioning its intelligence. Nothing is safe from his satiric pen. He attacks science and religion with equal intensity. He creates a novel that has left, "an indelible mark on an entire generation of readers" (back cover)....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 468 words
(1.3 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Cat's Cradle In the early sixties, Kurt Vonnegut Jr. released his candidly fantastical novel, Cat's Cradle. Within the text an entire religious sect, called Bokononism is born; a religion built on lies, absurdity, and irony. The narrator of Cat's Cradle is Jonah, a freelance writer who characterizes Bokononism as being, "free form as an amoeba" (Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle, 3). It is boundless and unpredictable as the unconscious itself. Bokonon lives on the impoverished island of San Lorenzo where he spends his days scribing poetic calypsos in the books of Bokonon....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Vonnegut Essays Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
3327 words
(9.5 pages)
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Anti-War Sentiments in Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five - On the surface, Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five are vastly dissimilar works of literature, each with its own creative style and plot. However, when the texts are examined with a discerning eye one can notice multiple thematic undercurrents such as war fate,time and suffering hidden in plain sight. Overwhelmingly common in Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five are strong anti-war sentiments which show all the ways "war is deleterious towards the human condition."(Marvin) Vonnegut shows how war only causes pointless suffering and destroys the human body through countless ironic deaths, including Edgar Derby's, who is shot for stealing a teapot shortly after hundreds of thou...   [tags: Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1187 words
(3.4 pages)
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Religious Allusions in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut’s fictional novel “Cat’s Cradle”, indirectly explores issues that parallels into topics such as religion, scientific/technological advancements, political power and much more. Vonnegut’s novel is narrated by a character named Jonah (John). He, Jonah, sets out to write an anthropological book based off of what key people were doing on the day that the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Throughout Vonnegut’s novel it can clearly represents how a writer can become a very destructive person to society....   [tags: literature, destructive writing, fiction]
:: 5 Works Cited
1439 words
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Blind Faith in Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut - In current society, critical thinking can be sparse. It is unusual that people question the traditions they have grown up with. Although this ignorance can be safe and simple, its outcome is ultimately problematic. In the satire Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut proves that undiscerning belief in anything will inevitably end in tragedy. Vonnegut demonstrates this using sensitive topics such as Science and Religion. In the present day, society depends on Science greatly; it supplies jobs, provides technology capable of saving lives, and furthers our society in many positive ways....   [tags: literary analysis, kurt vonnegut]
:: 1 Works Cited
1579 words
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle I believe that Vonnegut uses Cat's Cradle as an allegorical tale about what will happen to the world if we are not careful with technology that has the ability to end life on this planet. He points out one of the qualities of humanity; that people make mistakes, thus poisoning our minds and encouraging a better world. One of the obvious ways that Vonnegut uses this book to "encourage a better world" would be by showing that the end of world may come from an accidental release of technology....   [tags: Allegorical Tales Technology Essays] 1195 words
(3.4 pages)
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Cat's Cradle: The Destructive Nature Of Humans - Everyone has heard the expression "curiosity killed the cat." That is to say, the search for new wisdom can often have unpleasant consequences; a child curious about the kitchen stove is bound to get burned. This is exactly what Kurt Vonnegut demonstrates in Cat's Cradle with the example of ice-nine, which is developed by the fictional creator of the atom bomb, Felix Hoenikker. It is symbolic of the atom bomb in that it has the power to end human life. Hoenikker is obviously an exceedingly smart man; however, it can be inferred from his inventions that he does not always consider the negative consequences of his new discoveries....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut] 1532 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Role of Religion and Morality in Cat's Cradle - The Role of Religion and Morality in Cat's Cradle As an author, Kurt Vonnegut has received just about every kind of praise an author can receive: his works held the same sway over American philosophy as did those of Jack Kerouac or J.R.R. Tolkein; his writing has received acclaim from academics and the masses alike; and three of his books have been made into feature films. Society has permanently and noticeably been altered by his writing. Through accessible language and easily-understood themes, Vonnegut has created works subtle, engrossing, and familiar....   [tags: Papers] 966 words
(2.8 pages)
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Classical Gas, by California Guitar and Cat's in the Cradle, by Henry Chapin - A human being begins from one of the smallest cells in the body. We then, grow and evolve into extremely complex mechanisms made up of individual parts, such as the brain, the bones, and the heart. However, no matter how complex, a human is only one work, with individual parts working together to make it functional. Similarly, a work of art is composed of individual elements collaborating to create the overall work. Beginning with the colors chosen, to the way the artist swipes their brush in specific directions creating distinct textures, the work would not be complete without its most minute component....   [tags: Musical Analysis]
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1020 words
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A Comparison of Kurt Vonnegut's Two Novels: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five - Free will, the ability of organisms to make choices without being influenced by divine intervention, is one of history’s most debated philosophical topics. Kurt Vonnegut discusses this matter in his two novels Cat’s Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. In the first novel, he writes about a religion based on the idea that God puts us in groups to carry out His will. The second novel talks about a group of aliens from the planet Tralfamadore who say that out of the thirty-one inhabited planets in the universe, “Only on Earth is there any talk of free will.” In both novels, the protagonists Jonah and Billy accept their unavoidable fate, and so they don’t worry about life or death....   [tags: believing in free will despite fate] 616 words
(1.8 pages)
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Science versus Religion in Cat’s Cradle - “The idea that philosophy and science can be combined to give us the best possible knowledge about the world and how to act within it is an old one, encapsulated by the classic concept of scientia, a Latin word that means knowledge” (Pigliucci 6). In the book Cat’s Cradle the main topic of debate is clearly science versus religion. In many ways, these two topics are very different, but in others, they are quite similar. Both science and religion have a common goal, to find truth in the world. The main character of Cat’s Cradle is a man named John....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Philosophy, Religion]
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1425 words
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Kurt Vonnegut’s Novel Cat’s Cradle - In the fraudulent words of the prophet Bokonon, “God made mud. God got lonesome. So God said to some of the mud, ‘Sit up!’” (Vonnegut 220). Thus, the creation of man. Unfortunately for all the mud, some of the mud decided that the only thing missing in life was a way to end it. Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Cat’s Cradle takes a satirical look at the shortsightedness and hubris in man’s approach to new technology. In the novel, one of the designers of the bomb that fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Dr. Felix Hoenikker, invents a way for military commanders to solidify muddy battlefields into a hard surface, perfect for crossings by tanks and soldiers....   [tags: Literary Themes]
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1575 words
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Exploring Fear in Howl, Basketball Diaries, and Cat's Cradle - "yacketayakking screaming vomiting whispering facts and memories and anecdotes and eyeball kicks and shocks of hospitals and jails and wars" (Ginsberg 11). Like many authors of the modern literature movement, Allen Ginsberg explores the bomb's psychological affects on many Americans during the 1960s. Modern literature describes the chaos of the 1960s, caused by increasing societal problems and fear of the new atomic bomb. Writings such as The Basketball Diaries, "Howl" and Cat's Cradle express concepts of fear, power, governmental control, and death....   [tags: Synthesis Essays] 2112 words
(6 pages)
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Comparing Kurt Vonnegut's "Cat’s Cradle" and "Slaughterhouse Five" - On the surface, Kurt Vonnegut's Cat’s Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five are vastly dissimilar works of literature, each with its own creative style and plot. However, when the texts are examined with a discerning eye one can notice a common thread running through both. Not only does the previously hidden theme of war become abundantly clear upon further examination, but one realizes that Vonnegut cognisciently created situations and characters where he could voice his opinion and emphasize his detest for war....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 7 Works Cited
958 words
(2.7 pages)
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Questioning the Value of Literary Realism in Slaughterhouse Five, Cat's Cradle, and Mother Night - Questioning the Value of Literary Realism in Slaughterhouse Five, Cat's Cradle, and Mother Night In questioning the value of literary realism, Flannery O'Connor has written, "I am interested in making a good case for distortion because it is the only way to make people see." Kurt Vonnegut writes pessimistic novels, or at least he did back in the sixties. Between Slaughterhouse Five, Mother Night, and Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut paints a cynical and satirical picture of the degradation of society using distortion as the primary means to express himself....   [tags: Papers] 745 words
(2.1 pages)
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Avoiding Reality in Kurt Vonnegut's Breakfast of Champions and Cat's Cradle - Barry Diller once said, " This is a world in which reasons are made up because reality is too painful," implying that people would rather live within a created state of reality than to face what is ultimately true. Kurt Vonnegut's Breakfast of Champions and Cat's Cradle reveal the truth behind human ways, and how people avoid dealing with reality at all costs. Breakfast of Champions explains the way in which human tendencies are defense mechanisms, while Cat's Cradle proves that all truth is eventually lost because human ways are so warped....   [tags: Breakfast of Champions Essays] 971 words
(2.8 pages)
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Destiny as a Fictive Device in Cat's Cradle, Mother Night, and Jailbird - The literary genius of Kurt Vonnegut is evidenced by his ability to weave a story from the most mundane of characters and circumstances into an intricate web of possibilities for his stories by using literary tools such as cause and effect, congruence and destiny. Here we will examine Vonnegut's use of one of these literary tools, destiny as a fictive device, which serves to propel the three following books: Cat's Cradle, Mother Night, and Jailbird. Kurt Vonnegut is a master of fictive devices because he uses them to construct an intricate web of possibilities for his stories to proceed on....   [tags: Mother Night Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1602 words
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Comparing Themes in Cat’s Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five - Comparing Themes in Cat’s Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five           Throughout his career, Kurt Vonnegut has used writing as a tool to convey penetrating messages and ominous warnings about our society. He skillfully combines vivid imagery with a distinctly satirical and anecdotal style to explore complex issues such as religion and war. Two of his most well known, and most gripping, novels that embody this subtle talent are Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. Both books represent Vonnegut’s genius for manipulating fiction to reveal glaring, disturbing and occasionally redemptive truths about human nature....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1891 words
(5.4 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut’s novels Cat’s Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five - An Existence based on Forma (harmless untruths) “No wonder kids grow up crazy. A cat’s Cradle is nothing but a band of X’s between someone’s hands and little kid’s look and look at all those X’s… No damn cat and no damn cradle,” Vonnegut writes is his appropriately titled book Cat’s Cradle. A cat’s cradle is a string trick we all grew up learning and seeing, and it is just as Vonnegut described, nothing. Everyday we experience things like a cat’s cradle; we experience insignificant objects, feelings, or idols that we base our life on....   [tags: Analysis Significance Literature] 1364 words
(3.9 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut’s Opinions Expressed in Player Piano, Cat’s Cradle, and Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut’s Opinions Expressed in Player Piano, Cat’s Cradle, and Slaughterhouse-Five Every so often, a person comes along and encompasses the meaning of a generation. This person will capture everything people want to say, and then word it so well that his or her name becomes legendary. The sixties was an era with many of these people, each with his or her own means of reaching the people. Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., armed with a typewriter and a motive, was amongst those that defined the sixties....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
2281 words
(6.5 pages)
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Cats Cradle - "All the things I am about to tell you are shameless lies." So begins the Books of Bokonon. Bokononism is an original religion that is introduced in this book, Cats Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut. The book shows the importance of religion, even if that religion is "shameless lies". It also displays how people convince themselves that things are better then they really are. I read this book because of a promise I made to my father. I'm glad I made that promise; I just read a delightfully funny and deep tale about the end of the world....   [tags: essays research papers] 923 words
(2.6 pages)
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Cats Cradle - Synopsis: 'Cat's Cradle' by Kurt Vonnegut 1963 Abstract. This novel, filled with a variety of bizarre but all-too-human characters, focuses primarily on the ironic legacy of modern science, which, according to Vonnegut, promises mankind progress but only hastens the cataclysmic end of the world. As John, the narrator, researches the background for his book on the atomic bomb, he becomes fascinated by Dr. Felix Hoenikker. Hoenikker is the archetypal scientist, isolated from human contact, dedicated to his work, and completely without moral awareness....   [tags: essays research papers] 366 words
(1 pages)
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Vonnegut social commentary in cats cradle - Social Commentary in Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle Kurt Vonnegut’s science fiction novel, Cat’s Cradle, is chocked full of social commentary, satirical humor, and an overall pessimistic view on American Society. Through the fictional religion Bokononism Vonnegut introduces us to John, a young man who is writing a book about the day the atomic bomb was dropped. His research led him to the late Dr. Felix Hoenikker, a brilliant scientist who was deemed the “father of the atomic bomb.” Anxious to learn more about Hoenikker from his surviving children, John followed them to the impecunious island of San Lorenzo....   [tags: essays research papers] 1247 words
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Classical Gas, by California Guitar Trio and Cats in the Cradle, by Harry Chapin - A human being begins from one of the smallest cells in the body. We then, grow and evolve into extremely complex mechanisms made up of individual parts, such as the brain, the bones, and the heart. However, no matter how complex, a human is only one work, with individual parts working together to make it functional. Similarly, a work of art is composed of individual elements collaborating to create the overall work. Beginning with the colors chosen, to the way the artist swipes their brush in specific directions creating distinct textures, the work would not be complete without its most minute component....   [tags: Musical Analysis] 841 words
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Use Of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cats Cradle - Cat's Cradle: Religion and Satire What is religion. There is no one correct answer, however, one definition that seems to cover every aspect of most established religions is, "…the most comprehensive and intensive manner of valuing known to human beings" (Pecorino). In Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut takes this definition and creates his own religion in order to satirize all others. Bokononism, Vonnegut's contrived religion, is built on foma, or harmless untruths. Bokononists believe that good societies can only be built by keeping a high tension between good and evil at all times, and that there is no such thing as absolute evil (Schatt 64)....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut] 1440 words
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Possibilities for a Better World - Possibilities for a Better World The picture painted of the world and humanity by Kurt Vonnegut in Cats' Cradle is not a positive one. It is not the utopia that so many of the novel's character's are striving for. It is a ridiculous world where truths are based on lies and the balance of good and evil is a manufactured state. If Vonnegut's attempt is to "poison minds with humanity… to encourage them to make a better world," it is only through showing the reader the follies of man, the foolishness we live with daily, that maybe we can change our outlook and make a "better world." Within the 191 pages of Cat's Cradle Vonnegut manages to slam nearly every mode of life, every motivating facto...   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cats' Cradle Essays] 1194 words
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Temptation Cradle: Lady Macbeth - Acute award-winning novelist J.K. Rowling once said, “Power was my weakness and my temptation.” Temptation is something everyone encounters at least once in their lives. Indubitably, most people deal with it every day. The hard part about coping with temptation is to decide whether to yield or succumb to this perpetual temptation. Determining what to do with temptation is something that sets people apart from having a fragile, or having a tenacious personality. Shakespeare’s Macbeth fully delves into and reiterates all aspects of temptation throughout the entirety of this timeless play....   [tags: Shakespeare play characters] 811 words
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Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” - In Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” Afracanist presence as defined by Toni Morrison asserts itself through the narrator while transforming him from a tender kindhearted person into one who allows perverseness to take over. This type of presence allows the reader to witness the dark undertone and the hidden messages that lie within the text. In order to effectively show the narrators transformation and how his actions allow Afracanist presence to be presented, Poe uses two cats, one of which is completely black while the other resembles the first but instead has white fur covering the region of its breast....   [tags: Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat] 862 words
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Comparing the Anatomy and Physiology of a Domestic House Cat, to that of a Human - ... Microphages will swallow up the antigen and determine it dangerous or not. One of the most difficult parts is for the microphage to recognize the bacteria as self or non self so it does not destroy itself. When the antigen is consumed, it is displayed to helper B and T cells so they can create an immune response to the antigens. The skin is the most effective at stopping these antigens, as it covers your whole body. Helper t cells attack and destroy the antigen by summoning killer t cells. The B cells produce antibodies to neutralize the antigens, and marks them for destruction by other immune cells....   [tags: cat lab, observational activity, whiskers] 3198 words
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Mirror Images in Cat in the Rain - Mirror Images in Cat in the Rain      The opening paragraph of "Cat in the Rain" presented itself as a vivid painting, with Hemingway being the artist mentioned (Hemmingway, 167). This was the first in a series of mirrors that Hemingway placed in this short story. Reading this story was like being placed in a mirrored room, each mirrored wall being an element of the story reflecting upon another.   The reflection of Hemingway and the painter in the first paragraph was the first parallel that the reader is presented....   [tags: Cat in the Rain Essays]
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Feline Companionship in Cat in the Rain - Feline Companionship in Cat in the Rain I chose to write about Hemingway's "Cat in the Rain" in part because it is one of the few of his stories I have read which has an "ending." There is a specific event at the end of the story which wraps up the story's events and gives the reader a sense of finality not found in most of Hemingway's short works. Written in his characteristic sparse style, "Cat in the Rain" is seemingly simple in plot and character, but a careful reading reveals deeper meaning behind its elements....   [tags: Cat in the Rain Essays] 789 words
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Treatment of Women in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Frankenstein, and Othello - When we consider the patriarchal societies presented in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams (1954), Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1818) and Othello by William Shakespeare (1602), and attempt to draw conclusions between them, perhaps due to the two-hundred years passing amid the texts, the patriarchal society presented in Othello, one which values bravery and honour, as seen in act I scene II, by Othello ascribing Desdemona’s love of him as owing to the “battles, sieges, fortunes that I have pass’d”; contrasts with that shown in Frankenstein, whereby, as Dr Siv Jannsson comments, Shelley reveals the, “confrontation between a scientific pursuit as seen as masculine and a feminine natur...   [tags: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof] 1996 words
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The Black Cat - Abnormal Madness - The  Black Cat - Abnormal Madness It seems that almost every Edgar Allen Poe story ever written has a much deeper and darker meaning hidden inside its lines. Many of these pieces are demented enough even if the reader does not read "between the lines." "The Black Cat" is an example of this kind of story. In this morbid look into the narrator's mind, the reader follows the narrator as he does many disturbing things in his household. This story, like many of Poe's other pieces, is a venture into abnormal psychology where the narrator is completely insane, not only because of the horrible things he does to his cat and his wife, but  because of his state...   [tags: Poe The Black Cat Essays] 1191 words
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The Voice Inside: Rhetorical Analysis of The Black Cat - In Edgar Allan Poe’s ominous short story “The Black Cat”, the main character, who is also the narrator, commits many horrifying crimes, making the reader question his morality. Throughout Poe’s story, the narrator constantly gives reason to his actions, such as a “spirit of perverseness” that led him “to do wrong for wrong sake’s only” (“Black Cat” 117). The reader may analyze this statement and relate it to times in their own life where they have done wrong for reasons they cannot fathom. Through writing such an eerily descriptive first person narrative, Poe effectively engrosses his audience in his story, warning them of what could happen when one lets their voice inside take control....   [tags: Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat, Short Story]
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Representations of Madness in "The Yellow Wallpaper" and "The Black Cat" - The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is the story of a woman spiralling into madness whilst her physician husband refuses to acknowledge that she has a "real" problem. On the other hand The Black Cat by Edgar Alan Poe is about a man who is initially fond of cats however as the plot progresses he becomes an alcoholic making him moody and violent, which lead him to torture and kills the animals and eventually also his wife. In Edgar Allan Poe’s "The Black Cat," symbolism is used to show the narrator’s capacity for violence, madness, and guilt .The recurring theme present in both these stories is that the main protagonists claim that they suffer or have been taken over by a form of...   [tags: Yellow Wallpaper, Black Cat, Charlotte Perkins Gil] 632 words
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Time Cat by Lloyd Alexander - Time Cat by Lloyd Alexander Type of story: Fictional Setting: 1.Time: Historical period: the story jumps from different times. While traveling though they go from 2700b.c. to 55b.c. to 998b.c. to 411b.c. to 998a.d. to 1468 to 1555 to 1588 to 1600 to 1775. 2. Place: Geographical location: This story as well as switching from time to time it also switches from place to place. While traveling they go the places of Egypt, Rome and Britain, Ireland, Japan, Italy, Peru, The Isle of Man, and finally to America....   [tags: Time Cat Lloyd Alexander Outline] 1449 words
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Freudian Psyche in Geisel's The Cat in the Hat - Freudian Psyche in Geisel's The Cat in the Hat   "Then we saw him step in on the mat. We looked. And we saw him. The Cat in the hat!" (Seuss 6)   Through the years, many parents have read the children's book The Cat in the Hat to their kids. Written by Theodore Geisel, otherwise known as Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat is a lively and wonderful book to read to children. No only that, but also it helps teach children about right and wrong through fun and exciting characters. But many kids and parents alike are missing a piece of the puzzle....   [tags: Cat in the Hat Essays]
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Marriage in Ernest Hemingway's Cat in the Rain - Marriage in Ernest Hemingway's Cat in the Rain In today's society, people have the assumptions that we have evolved far beyond past cultural notions and marital stereotypes. The reality to this is that we are not so superior and tend to take the easy way out in relationships. This is reflected through our atrocious divorce rate. The American wife in Ernest Hemingway's 'Cat in the Rain,' although controlled by her husband, George, is an obvious victim of marital neglect. While vacationing in Italy, the romance capital of the world, George's use of control and carelessness cause the wife to focus on a stray cat for fulfillment....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Cat Rain Essays]
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Symbolism in Cat in the Rain by Ernest Hemingway - Symbolism in Cat in the Rain by Ernest Hemingway In his short story Cat in the Rain, Ernest Hemingway uses imagery and subtlety to convey to the reader that the relationship between the American couple is in crisis and is quite clearly dysfunctional. In other words, the reader has to have a symbolic reading of the images. In fact, what seems to be a simple tale of an American couple spending a rainy afternoon inside their hotel room serves as a great metaphor for their relationship....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Cat Rain Hemingway]
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Lies and Mendacity in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" - Lies and Mendacity run rampant in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. They help keep the play going and keep it interesting. The play shows us the lies that people tell themselves and other instead of the truth that is hard to accept but must be said. The entire family is involved with lies to Big Daddy and Big Momma, as are the doctors. They tell them that Big Daddy does not have cancer, but only a spastic colon. Brick lies to himself about his feelings for Skipper until Big Daddy forces him to face it. He then understands that he is upset about the way his clean friendship has been misinterpreted....   [tags: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof] 276 words
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Features of British Mystery School Writing Illustrated in Agatha Christie's Cat Among the Pigeons - Published in 1959, Cat Among the Pigeons is described as one of Agatha Christie’s most memorable novels. The story begins in Ramat amidst a political revolution, where Jennifer Sutcliffe’s uncle, Bob Rawlinson, is entrusted with precious jewels. Yet he soon meets his death and no one is the wiser about what has become of the jewels. Months later, his niece among with many other students, return for the summer term at the prestigious girls’ school, Meadowbank. However, it soon becomes apparent there is a killer in their midst with the murder of two of the mistresses....   [tags: Agatha Christie, Cat Among the Pigeons] 1763 words
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The Importance of Point of View in The Black Cat - The Importance of Point of View in The Black Cat Point of view is a very important aspect of The Black Cat. The main character tells the story to the reader from his first person point of view. You have a good feel for the story because you have the first person narration. As you read into the story it comes apparent however that the narrator telling the story is not a reliable interpretation of the details around him. You have a good feel for his emotions and the events of the story, but the narrators opinions are so far out that you are forced to wonder just what of the story is the askew interpretation of a madman and what is the reality of the situation....   [tags: The Black Cat Point of View Literature Essays] 1328 words
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Edgar Allan Poe's The Black Cat - Edgar Allan Poe's The Black Cat Edgar Allan Poe's "The Black Cat" is a story of how an arguably demonic, manipulating black cat ruins the life of its master. After being maimed and murdered by its once loving owner, the cat is reincarnated and finds its way back to its murderer to seek revenge....   [tags: Edgar Allan Poe Black Cat, remorse] 1312 words
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Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" In 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof' Williams presents the audience with w world of mendacity. Every fibre of the character's being is based on a spectrum of deceit, from self-deception, to exploitation to social lies. The characters' names themselves conceal the irony and deceit, for example Brick, the leading man. The name Brick itself suggests a tough, strong man, but Brick's character suggests a weak, pathetic man who tries hard to forget his past by indulging in a life of alcohol....   [tags: Williams Cat Hot Tin Roof Essays] 2153 words
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Formalistic Approach to Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach to Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Formal analysis of poetry helps to unfold the underlying meaning of a poem. This technique does not focus on the author of the poem, or what was happening in history during the time when the poem was written, but instead puts emphasis on the actual mean of the work. Formal analysis breaths life into the literary work and allows the poem to speak for itself. For example, in Thomas Grays' poem "Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes," paying close attention to word choice, structure, and rhyme scheme illuminates the actions of the prowling cat....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 583 words
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Formalistic Approach to Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach to Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Ode to the Death of a Favourite Cat is a very interesting poem especially when you begin to break it down using the formalistic approach to literature. This poem at first glance could be taken as just another story about a cat that drowns trying to eat his prey, the goldfish. As we look more closely we realize that the poem has so many more meanings. The form of a poem is also a large component on the effectiveness. This poem has 7 stanzas with 6 lines in each....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 627 words
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Morals of Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Morals of Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) It is very difficult to understand what a writer mean when they write a poem, because you have to get in to a frame of mind that you think the writer was in when they composed the poem. In the Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes, Thomas Gray uses a cat and fish to teach a moral. In the Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes the setting was set in the first stanza. The poem gave you an idea that it took place in a very nice house that had a large china vase, that held water, also it give the allusion that in this vase were flowers and fish....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 662 words
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Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) In Thomas Gray's poem "Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat," we find many examples of the Formalistic Approach. In this poem, we find numerous examples of alliteration, rhyme scheme, puns, and creative word choice. This poem is very joyful and fun to read because the author is very creative in his choice of words and phrases. In the first stanza, we figure out where this event is taking place or in other words, we find out the setting....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 698 words
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A Freudian Analysis of Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - A Freudian Analysis of Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) "Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat" can be a poem that represents a sexist view of women while identifying the three psychological entities; the id, ego, and superego. The cat in the poem represents the human female. Throughout the poem it is referred to as a "she", and identified with similar, sexist traits that women have. These traits are laziness, the need for shiny, pretty objects, and an unquenchable desire for material goods....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 545 words
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The Dead Kitty in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - The Dead Kitty in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Gray's "Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes" is a story of a curious cat that ends up in Purrgitory (ha ha). Gray uses not only formalistic literary devices, but he also uses dialog. As Gray speaks to the reader, he uses word choice and allusions to convey the correlation between women and cats. Word choice plays a major roll in this poem, due to the fact that it helps set up allusion and other literary devices....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 626 words
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Greed in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Greed in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite)   Greed is one of the underlying themes found in Thomas Gray's Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat. This greed becomes the ultimate demise of the lead character, Selima the Cat. Mr. Gray uses a few different literary techniques to bring to life the inanimate written words. These techniques along with word choice allow for the possibility of many different interpretations of the text.   The general format Mr. Gray follows is seven stanzas of AACBBC form, wherein the A and B lines consist of eight syllables and the C lines consist of six....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 616 words
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Exploring Pain in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - Exploring Pain in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof       "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof," written by Tennessee Williams is a brilliant play about a dysfunctional family that is forces to deal with hidden deceptions and hypocrisy.  The issues that this play revolves around transcend time and region.   By 1955 Tennessee Williams was already a well known and respected playwright. Theatergoers, as well as critics, had enthusiastically anticipated the arrival of "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof." Many loved the play, but they had difficulty with the play's resolution....   [tags: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Essays]
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Finding Deeper Meaning in Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat - Finding Deeper Meaning in Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat        First impressions are important when meeting new people, applying for jobs, and even when reading literature. It provides us with an idea of what is going on, where things are taking place, and who the important characters are. This first impression can be described is the Pre-Critical Response; the average reader performs this type of analysis every time he or she reads. For some people, this simplistic perspective is satisfactory; others find the quest for deeper understanding intriguing and part of the ultimate experience gained through literature....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays]
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Genius and Madness in Christopher Smart’s My Cat Jeoffry - Genius and Madness in Christopher Smart’s My Cat Jeoffry A series of verses commencing with the word “for”, Christopher Smart’s “My Cat Jeoffry” is surprisingly modernistic and intriguing. Written while Smart was confined in a mental asylum for incessant praying, the aphoristic poem praises the cat Jeoffry, a faithful servant to God. Unrestricted by rigid poetic structures, “My Cat Jeoffry” is nevertheless organized and coherent, ablaze with a current of religious fervour. It is impossible to know if the poem was inspired by genius or by madness, but it is infused with sanity and truth....   [tags: My Cat Jeoffry]
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Homosexual Theme in Tennessee William's Cat On A Hot Tin Roof - Homosexual Theme in Tennessee William's Cat On A Hot Tin Roof              In his essay "Come back to the Locker Room Ag'in, Brick Honey!" Mark Royden Winchell discusses several aspects of the homosexual theme in Tennessee William's play Cat On A Hot Tin Roof. Winchell describes the play as subversive because it casts doubt onto the innocence of male companionship, the two most tolerant characters are the most overtly heterosexual characters, and homosexuality is depicted as a personal rather than social or political problem, despite the time period of this play....   [tags: Cat On A Hot Tin Roof]
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The Cradle - THE CRADLE My book is called The Cradle by Arthur C. Clarke. The setting of this book takes place in sunny West Keys in Florida. The main characters in this book are Carol Dawson who is a Miami photojournalist. She takes pictures and writes stories about the pictures and sells them to the local news and newspaper. Nick Williams is a woman-hating Ivy League drop out who captains a boat for his own scuba diving company. Troy Jefferson is Nick’s trusty crewman who aids Nick in the epic story. This also is Non-Fiction....   [tags: essays research papers] 504 words
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Izutsu or The Well-Cradle by Zeami - Among the most classic Japanese Nō dramas is none other than Izutsu, or “The Well-Cradle” as often translated in English. Written by Zeami who is perhaps the most influential playwright to the Nō Theater, Izutsu was composed around the late 14th century during the Muromachi Period in Japan. In comparison with other Nō plays, it is relatively simple in nature as there are only three roles that need to be played—shite, waki, and ai—and the story is very characteristic of the typical Nō drama (Araki and Brazell, 143)....   [tags: Noh drama, Zeami, Isutzu]
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Izutsu or The Well-Cradle Lady - Izutsu, a noh play, has many references towards Ise Monogatari. The term Izutsu can be translated literally into “well-cradle lady,” but can be referred as “well curb.” “Well curb” would be known as the railing around the edge of a well. The well in this play is located at Isonokami, the location where Ariwara no Narihira and Ki no Aritsune’s daughter lived together. According to history, this well was supposedly built by Ariwara no Narihira. Ariwara no Narihira has been linked and connected with Ise Monogatari’s short episodes and poems....   [tags: Ise Monogatari, noh play]
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