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The Client/Therapist Relationship - ... Several factors should be considered when determining the pace of therapy. Highly motivated families can keep a more rapid pace, whereas, a more resistive family might benefit from a slower pace. It is the therapists’ job to keep the pace in therapy. When reviewing the interview, I thought I was keeping a decent pace. However, I had many factors running around in my mind. Am I asking questions too fast. Will I meet the 20 minute requirement. I even noticed I interrupted the client when she was answering a question....   [tags: Therapy/Counseling]
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1865 words
(5.3 pages)
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Mental Health Experts: Client Therapist vs. Court Forensic Expert - ... The author further argues that therapeutic and forensic roles present the mental health expert with conflict of interests. The results are usually unethical. Thus, assuming dual roles must be avoided (Zur, 2011). Consequently, Greenberg and Shuman (1997) believe that mental health experts such as psychologists may be fact witnesses as well as assume other types of expert witnesses. A fact witness should be someone who can provide information from firsthand experience. Fact witness is different from expert witness in that the latter has specialized knowledge that not all persons possess, thus enabling the expert witness to provide facts and opinions that will aid the court in making the right conclusion....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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The Limits to a Counseling Relationship - Discuss the relevance of boundaries and ethics in the therapeutic relationship. Ethics in the counselling and psychotherapy protects the client and the therapist involved in the therapeutic relationship and the therapeutic process as a whole; with the concepts that act as a guide for the therapists in provision of good practice and care for the client. The framework is built on values of counselling and psychotherapy; principles of trustworthiness, autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, non-maleficence and self-respect, and provides standards of good practice and care for the practitioner (BACP, 2010)....   [tags: Relationship Counseling ] 2216 words
(6.3 pages)
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Is Psychotherapy More Effective When Therapist Disclose Information - “ Is Psychotherapy More Effective When Therapist Disclose Information About Themselves. ” In the world of psychology therapist raise a question whether or not they should “disclose personal information during psychotherapy. Several therapists “have suggested that therapist self-discloser can have a positive impact on treatment. From this view, self-discloser by the therapists may elicit greater discloser by the client enhancing the possibilities for client self-exploration”(e.g., Bugental, 1965, chap....   [tags: essays research papers] 1032 words
(2.9 pages)
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Helper Client Confidentiality - ... There is always hope that they will change their mind someday, should they still see therapy as a benefit rather than a cost. The helper should always be honest and open with his/her client, as well show respect and professional boundaries. That being said, the therapist is a human being and it is possible to inadvertently place the client at risk of harm. An example of that could be related to the therapist being rushed between clients and not securing a client’s file in a locked drawer, or perhaps even leaving it in plain sight for the next client to see the name on the outside of the file/chart....   [tags: Psychology]
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1114 words
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Client Centered Therapy - ... Thus, the client would have to be categorized with the assumption that he has experienced in his past “severed free and open communication with his peers”. This would mean that a client with clear and reciprocated communication with her loved ones would not find use in Client Centered Therapy. According to Truscott (2010), “our efforts to feel good about ourselves we tend to try to incorporate others' expectations― thereby denying our true selves and adopting instead a conditional self― resulting in feelings of disorganization and emotional pain....   [tags: Therapy, Rogers,Truscott] 1397 words
(4 pages)
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Client Centered Theory - ... The four commonly accepted types of attachment are: secure, anxious, avoidant and insecure disorganized/disoriented (Hutchison, 2008, p. 119). As the general population ages, more attention is beginning to be focused on how the theory applies to the influences of attachment for older adults in the areas of chronic illness and coping with bereavement and loss (Bradley & Cafferty, 2001; Coady & Lehman, 2008). Chronically ill older adults can experience the loss of their autonomy with often increasing or total dependence on others to help with their activities of daily living and with their psychological needs (Bradley & Cafferty, 2001)....   [tags: Psychology]
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1238 words
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Racial Oppression and Counseling a Client from an Ethnic Minority - It is pertinent to study the history of racial oppression when preparing to counsel a client from an ethnic minority if the counselor is from the majority culture. The problem is it would be difficult to examine the complete history and would be highly impossible especially in a short time. However, a therapist can gain knowledge of some of the essentials of history such as, religion, family structure, and background information. If the therapist or counselor is uncomfortable counseling these individuals he/or she can refer the client to someone who has more knowledge or has the same cultural background as the client....   [tags: racism, prejudice, racial profiling] 428 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Professional Relationship - ... 16). In this relationship the psychologist plays a dual role as the professor of the student as well as personal therapist. The role a professor plays in a student’s life is to educate the student. The role a therapist plays in a client’s life is to listen to personal issues and to provide therapeutic intervention. In this scenario, the professor is asked to do both, which will create boundary issues for the professor as well as the client. According to the AACD Ethical Standards (1988) as cited by Herlihy and Corey (1992), “dual relationships with clients that might impair the member’s objectivity and professional judgment, must be avoided…” (p....   [tags: Psychology]
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1643 words
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The Therapeutic Relationship - ... That quote made me think about how important it is to make sure the client feels understood. The focus should not be on my understanding of the client, but rather on if the client believes I have accurately grasped his or her story. It also pointed out the importance of keeping the client at the center of therapy. If the client is not the center, than I am not truly going to care if he or she feels understood. Instead, I will be focusing on other factors that may not be as pertinent to making therapy successful....   [tags: Psychology]
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1861 words
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Developing a Therapeutic Counseling Relationship - ... If the client feels “safe” in the session, this can be very powerful for them. As sessions occur, the client will feel more comfortable in trusting the clinician with their feelings, attitudes and emotions. The client is able to present their needs and problems in ways that only they can express. Another factor that may resonate in the sessions may include transference and counter-transference. Transference is when the client’s attitudes, feelings and emotional conflicts from past events begin to be directed to the therapist, while Countertransference is exactly the opposite, when the therapist’s attitudes, feelings, and emotional conflicts from the past are directed towards the client (Transference and Countertransference, 2011)....   [tags: Counseling ]
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1113 words
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Uncovering a Relationship Between Alcohol and Violence Using Correlation Research - Correlation research reveals a pattern between two variables that have been measured several times. To uncover a relationship between alcohol and violence, I would use the correlation research. Using naturalistic observation, I would observe public intoxication at common bars or clubs, and involve accessible records of already convicted violent offenders that acknowledge the use of alcohol. I would choose this method because I believe this would be an abundant amount of knowledge that could properly disclose a correlation, weather positive or negative, between alcohol and violence, and present a strong or weak number that predicts the correlation thus making this research method the most viable....   [tags: Psychology] 976 words
(2.8 pages)
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Ethical Boundaries Misused in Today’s Clinical Psychology - ... As these details show, there are exceptions where therapist self-disclosure can help the patient to gain understanding to benefit in treatment; however, the overall rule shown by these facts is that therapist self-disclosure can harm patients because they may misunderstand why the therapist shared a personal information or experience as a boundary crossing. Next, out of office boundaries are how the therapist or psychologist and the client exchange information. According to Cynthia Wessinger, LSCW, “It is not ethically correct and for any mental health professional treating you, to acknowledge you in public with a wave or have a conversation outside the office....   [tags: Psychology]
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Ethical dilemmas in Psychological Practice - ... In addition, the author would proceed to explain to her client that she thinks it would be in the best interest of both parties to s refrain from entering into any other form of social relationship because it may cause skewness in objectively, it may affect performance of her functioning as a psychologist, positive and beneficial perspectives in objectivity. In addition, the author will also explain that such relationship could risk exploitation of their therapist-client relationship, cause biased decisions, and impairments in making sound and reasonable decisions....   [tags: Ethics] 1030 words
(2.9 pages)
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Issues and Ethics in The "Helping" Professions - ... It is good not to impose values onto to clients but sometimes it might be beneficial. For example, the client is a woman who values her life at nothing and says she has no reason to live. A therapist may need to remind them that there is a purpose of life and there are reasons to live and value life and the future. The therapist wouldn’t intentionally push his values to the client, but if the client has no values they may adopt the therapists’ values in their journey to realizing there is a purpose of life....   [tags: Ethics/Morality]
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2181 words
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The Value of Rogers' Theory - ... However, I also believe that professionalism, especially related to boundaries, must be present as well. Roger’s conditions take empathy to an extreme by requiring the helper to enter “the private world of the other and becoming thoroughly at home in it (Hill, p.87).” I think a helper can be empathetic by truly understanding and identifying with a client’s situation and feelings without becoming a resident in the client’s thoughts and mind. There is a risk of crossing boundaries when a helper surrenders all their senses to the client....   [tags: Psychology, Therapy] 1282 words
(3.7 pages)
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Anorexia Nervosa - ... This has significant ethical and legal implications for counselors who may not be aware of this obligation to protect. Although there is a debate about involuntarily hospitalizing clients with anorexia, this is a necessary action for clients whose behavior places them at extreme risk of death. According to Werth et al. (2003), counselors should be aware of high-risk behaviors and factors that contribute to the steady decline of the client’s health. These indicators include a BMI below 15, serious medical conditions, an imbalance in electrolytes, comorbid psychiatric conditions, and previous hospitalizations (Werth et al., 2003, p....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
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Roger’s Theory as compared to that of Ellis’ Theory - ... Irrational beliefs are unhealthy, negative emotions in the conscious that clouds your judgment in yourself, others and the environment. According to REBT therapists, only hard work and practice can make rational beliefs. Rational beliefs represents reasonable, flexible, and constructive conclusion about reality. As Rogers’ and Ellis’ both established “core conditions” in their theories. Rogers argued that each component is essential for therapeutic change; on the other hand, Ellis believed that therapeutic change can take place in the absence of these conditions....   [tags: Psychology, Therapy] 957 words
(2.7 pages)
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My Personal Theory Of Counseling - ... There are key factors that account for changes in behavior such as, physical, social, and intellectual. Physical factors are associated with an individual’s health and well being. For instance, if an individual has been infected by a disease or mental disorder their behavior will change. A person that suffers from depression will sleep more than usual, and will lack social interest, and this alters the person physically. Social factors associated with human development are the factors that surround the individual....   [tags: Psychology]
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991 words
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Cognitive Group Therapy - ... The relationship between therapist and client is collaborative and caring. Goals are set by the client with the help of the therapist. The therapy is very goal-orientated and specific. They then work together to assess and then change faulty beliefs that interfere with accomplishing these set goals. The basic goal is to remove biases or distortions that hinder the client from functioning effectively. Changing cognitive schemas can be done in three different ways; reinterpretation, modification, and restructuring....   [tags: Psychology]
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Diversity and Cultural Competence in Family Therapy - ... People may be very social and join groups and some may isolate. In American culture, both are accepted as normal. In Japan, a similar dynamic exists with group membership fostering intimacy, and the second dynamic is the hierarchical organization arising from differences in age, social status, and social roles. These differences create distance among members of society. Understanding these differences will help the therapist guide the client in making changes within their life and managing unwanted behaviors....   [tags: Psychology]
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1048 words
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Naikan Therapy - Naikan Therapy The man responsible for the development of Naikan Therapy is Mr. Ishin Yoshimoto. Mr. Yoshimoto developed Naikan therapy as a short term structural treatment that is useful in treating marital and familial conflicts, interpersonal relationship issues, depression and anxiety, self-esteem issues, behavioral disorders, and addictive behaviors (Ramaswami & Sheikh, 1989, p. 106). Nakian translates to mean 'to look within one's self. The purpose of Naikan therapy is to increase awareness of oneself as well as acceptance without becoming judgmental (Walsh, 1989)....   [tags: Papers] 1548 words
(4.4 pages)
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Therapeutic presence - ... (2009). Mindfulness increases the capacity of the therapist to focus their awareness on the present moment and on the client’s sense of being (Sheppard et al., 2009). This sense of awareness is circumscribed as “being present”, which is complex to quantify but is perceptible to others by various modes such as the quality of listening and the open form of discourse (Sheppard et al., 2009). This sense of awareness fosters empathy in the therapist and strengthens the therapeutic relationship with the client (Sheppard et al., 2009)....   [tags: Psychology]
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Traits of an Effective Counselor - ... Communicative attunement helps the client symbolize, organize, and make sense of inner experiences (Clarke, 2010). As this case study demonstrates the professional counselor used open questions to encourage exploration and to help identify the client’s thoughts. These questions in the case study allow room for the client to respond in numerous different ways, which depends on the needs and intentions of the client in the here- and- now of the counseling session. Open questions allow the professional counselor to pull together the key issues to begin the collaborative process of determining a plan of action for the client....   [tags: Counseling ]
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1081 words
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Identifying Therapeutic Goals - The behavior therapist is likely to work with a client in identifying therapeutic goals through several means. Identifying therapeutic goals is one of his top priorities because only then can he truly go to work to help his client. He has his purpose in mind: to work through a systematic process to help his client to the best of his ability. The behavior therapist has confidence that the behavioral therapeutic models have been tried and tested. He understands that his focus is on his client’s current problems, specific goals and treatment plan....   [tags: Counseling] 889 words
(2.5 pages)
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A Reflective Comparison of the Person- Centred and Reality Therapy Elements in Egan’s (2007) The Skilled Helper, Addressed Within an Educational Conte - ... Marzano and Pickering’s (1997) advised strategy for this to be accomplished is to establish a relationship with the students.(Marzano & Pickering, 1997. pg 16 ) The Skilled helper model comprises of three cycling stages that guide the counselling process. In stage one, the skilled helper is endeavouring to establish the current situation, the client's story, where the therapist is unearthing ‘what’s going on?’. Once the client has established the situation, there is a need to return to specific sections of the story in an attempt to uncover blind spots or gaps through the clients’ perception and assessment of the situation of others....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Therapeutic Alliance - ... Without this feature, the therapists will not be able to develop the kind of relationship needed with the patients to successfully treat them. The therapists are required to develop flexibility, creativity, and compassion. With these attributes, they will have the fundamentals of creating a strong therapeutic alliance with their clients. The therapists should be encouraged in “treating new cases as unique and constructing new theories to fit them, rather than depending on categories of established theory and technique” (Safran & Muran, 2000)....   [tags: Health Care, Treatment] 1120 words
(3.2 pages)
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My Personal Theory of Counseling as Demonstrated in My Practice - ... Level ones are generally those who are in court-mandated or involuntary counseling or treatment; level twos through fives tend to present at mental health centers, private practice, and short-term psychiatric treatment. Reality therapy is concerned with the realistic and attainable. To that end, the therapist works to establish a relationship that is warm, open, nonjudgmental, and respectful. The therapist listens to the client's story, focuses on the present, on strengths, and on things the client can control....   [tags: Counseling ]
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Brief Therapy - ... Changing the mind, leading the client to solutions through specific questioning techniques will allow the client to formulate ideas. "Furthermore, Selekman believed there are assumptions that benefit those who deal with resistant adolescents and their families. The assumptions are extremely practical and provide therapists a new lens for viewing the tough adolescent case. Each of the guiding assumptions provides a wellness perspective on adolescent problems, families, and brief therapy. Matching our treatment to the state of change will foster a cooperative relationship....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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Cognitive Therapy - Beck and his theories of cognitive therapy seem to provide a good balance between the amount of direction and authority the client and therapist each have. I like that Beck does provide direction and insight, but in a way that does not make him seem like he is just dictating a diagnosis. Beck discusses what he thinks is going on with the client and explains what he thinks and why. The idea of collaborative empiricism is one that empowers the client to go out into his or her world and test his or her biases, but this is also done with the help of the therapist who can guide the process....   [tags: Psychology] 436 words
(1.2 pages)
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Humanistic Psychology - The focus of this paper is the person-centered approach, which is the understanding of personality and human relationships in psychotherapy and counseling in the areas of client-centered therapy, education of student-centered learning, organizations, and other group settings. Even though psychoanalysis and behaviorism have made major contributions to psychology, it has influenced the understanding and practices of the humanistic movement, specifically with the therapies for the different mental disorders....   [tags: Psychology]
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Breach Of Confidentiality: The Legal Implications When You Are Seeking - Breach of Confidentiality: The Legal Implications When You Are Seeking Therapy Abnormal Psychology 204 November 2, 1996 Breach of Confidentiality: The legal Implications when You are seeking Therapy I. The need for confidentiality in therapy A. Establish trust B. A patients bill of rights Thesis: The duty to warn has created an ethical dilemma for psychological professionals. II. Therapists face a moral problem B. Requirement by law to breach confidentiality C. Exceptions for breaching confidentiality D....   [tags: essays research papers] 1908 words
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The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy - The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is based on the concept that behavior change may be achieved through altering cognitive processes. The assumption underlying the cognitively based therapeutic techniques is that maladaptive cognitive processes lead to maladaptive behaviors and changing these processes can lead to behavior modification. According to Mahoney (1995), an individual's cognitions are viewed as covert behaviors, subject to the same laws of learning as overt behaviors....   [tags: Papers] 2421 words
(6.9 pages)
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Use of Interpreters in Psychological Therapy with Deaf Patients - ... However, in some cases depending on how the interpreter thinks or feels, both the client and therapist can be influenced cognitively or behaviorally during a therapy session. Since communication is critical for the entire therapeutic process, the language barrier with deaf patients is the principal issue. The gap in available services makes it apparent that when problems such as depression, drug abuse, and other psychological issues arise and go untreated the Deaf run the risk of not successfully integrating socially through employment, social activities, or culture....   [tags: Psychology]
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1401 words
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Psychoanalysis vs. Person-Centered Therapy - ... Dysfunction is caused by the incongruence between self and experience. In that, their perceptions of the self and their experience are not consistent with reality. Healthy individuals, are congruent, and their perceptions are in tune with reality. They do not operate on conditions of worth and are able to experience unconditional positive regard (Murdock, 2009, p. 1661). According to Rogers, a “lack of congruity within the self creates psychological problems” (Carver & Scheier, 2008, p. 343)....   [tags: Psychology, Worth, Positive Regard] 1708 words
(4.9 pages)
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Approaches to Therapy - ... The views of human nature can form from a valid hypothesis, beliefs or convictions, philosophy and personalities from the individual who created the theory. Key factors that account for changes in behavior Developing goals for clients are essential for a productive treatment. There are different behaviors therapists must observe to have knowledge that the techniques that were incorporated are benefiting the client and the client is becoming well. The person centered and psychoanalytic approaches have key components that emphasized that the techniques incorporated by the therapist are sufficient for the client....   [tags: Psychology] 2047 words
(5.8 pages)
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Five Factors Theorized to be Important in Countertransference - Five Factors Theorized to be Important in Countertransference countertransference and the expert therapist, this study looks at how beginning therapists rate five factors theorized to be important in countertransference management: (I) anxiety management, (2) conceptualizing skills, (3) empathic ability, (4) self-insight and (5) self-integration. Using an adaptation of the Countertransference Factors Inventory (CFI) designed for the previously mentioned studies, 48 beginning therapists (34 women, 14 men) rated 50 statements as to their value in managing countertransference....   [tags: Papers] 611 words
(1.7 pages)
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A Case Study of Ethics in Psychology - ... Given this ethical guideline, it would be ethically permissible for the psychologist to establish a therapeutic relationship with the client as long as the psychologist recognizes the potential impact the previous relationship could have on the therapeutic relationship and does everything to minimize potential harm to the client. The second ethical issue occurred when the psychologist disclosed information about Mr. Hartwig’s to his psychiatrist without Mr. Hartwig’s consent. The psychologist motivations for contacting Mr....   [tags: Ethics, Psychology]
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Ethics in the Mental Health Profession - ... For instance, if you attend a large university that your therapist also happens to attend, this may be potentially safe, though it can potentially affect your confidentially, or make you feel very uncomfortable when you meet your psychologist in a public setting. The psychologist is still held by confidentiality, and cannot reveal that you are his or her client. Yet, a client can violate any boundaries without any scolding. For that reason, in the mental health professions, dual relationships are generally not recommended....   [tags: Psychologyy]
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An Overview of Counseling and Psychotherapy - An Overview of Counseling and Psychotherapy I. Title Overview of Counseling and Psychotherapy II. Definition Psychotherapy is the treatment of individuals with emotional problems, behavioral problems, or mental illness primarily through verbal communication. At one time the term psychotherapy referred to a form of psychiatric treatment used with severely disturbed individuals. Counseling, on the other hand, refers to the treatment of people with milder psychological problems or to advice given on vocational and educational matters....   [tags: Papers] 1103 words
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Interpretation in The Deaf Community - ... neutral, slightly cheerful, etc.) (Brunson and Lawrence, 2002). These shifts in moods have the potential to negatively affect the Deaf patient because they may feel unaccepted based on the reaction of the interpreter. This can lead to the patient feeling isolated. If an unbiased communication bridge is not established immediately, the therapist runs the risk of his or her patient not fully participating for fear of judgment or quitting therapy. Also noted in the study, was that interpreters are able to function successfully in many settings without partiality, however in counseling there is a higher emotional import of feelings and thoughts, which may create a problem of using an interpreter in this context....   [tags: Disability Therapy]
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Characteristics and behaviors of an effective counselor - ... In this case study, the counselor reflects on progress that the client has made and then begins to talk about the next session. He uses this planning summary as a way of closing their time together. Ineffective Characteristics and Behaviors Sheperis and Ellis (2010) describe the informed consent process and intake as an important part of establishing the structure and boundaries of the client relationship. In this scenario, the counselor asks some intake questions but neglects to cover the informed consent information regarding confidentiality limits....   [tags: Psychology]
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Dual Relationships and Self-Disclosure - Dual Relationships and Self-Disclosure Chemical Dependency counselors have quite a few ethical dilemmas to deal with. Therapists that are in recovery may confront some even more complex dilemmas, opposed to those who are not. There is a high percentage of addiction counselors that are in recovery. In fact, 55% of 36,000 members of the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Counselors (NAADAC) are recovering alcoholics and 21% are recovering from some other chemical dependency. This brings up two sides to counselors in recovery....   [tags: Papers] 1117 words
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A Career in Multicultural Counseling - The basic concepts and purposes of multicultural counseling include the following answers. The main purpose of multicultural counseling is creating a positive and friendly environment, when counseling clients from an ethical or racial background or minority group. The main goal for counselors is to recognize issues of multicultural diversity in today’s society. These potential clients can include people in business, medical, or manufacturing as well as, students, and immigrants. The culture centered approach to counseling in a positive way but these behaviors can have no meaning, until both the client and the therapist understand the cultural context....   [tags: multicultural counseling, counseling, ] 489 words
(1.4 pages)
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Art of Psychotherapy - ... In order to receive reimbursement and compete with psychopharmacology there is a growing necessity for the reliance on empirically validated therapy (Reisner, 2005). Psychotherapy has recently been relying more on the treatment techniques and less on the art in order to provide more competitive therapeutic options. Yet, if managed care begins to dictate what treatments have to be used, then empirically validated treatments will be used against psychologists as a form of restriction that may inhibit the success of the therapeutic process (Scaturo, 2001).However, certain artful tactics involved in psychotherapy will never be completely removed, such as the development of a therapeutic relationship (Allen, 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, Psychotherapy] 1295 words
(3.7 pages)
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Psychoanalysis Therapy - ... If they behave badly, it is a mismatch that results from neglect of self-actualization needs in childhood, but also in adulthood. The individual strives for self-realization, growth, and autonomy. This therapy presupposes that patients know the factors in life that make them unhappy and they are able to change them (Corey, 2009; Raskin, Rogers, & Witty, 2008). In the case described by Yalom, the patient is aware of what is making him unhappy; however, he needs help changing the circumstances that he has control over....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Life As An HIV/Aids Counselor - ... The ability to cope with chronic illness is difficult. For the therapist, it will be a journey of support that will most likely be unmatched when working with other patients. I would begin treatment by compiling, with each client, a list of their problems, and let them reflect on what they want out of my services and out of their personal life. From there, it is my job, as counselor, to assist the client to identify possible solutions to these problems. When appropriate, I would encourage clients to come up with their own solutions because clients will be more likely to carry out solutions that they find feasible and practical....   [tags: Counseling ]
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The Integration of Cognitive and Behavior Therapy - ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy by far does not in any way tell people how they should feel. In other words, it is not the stimulus itself which somehow elicits an emotional response directly, but our evaluation of or thought about that stimulus. However, when most people seek this type of therapy, they want to rid themselves of the ways they have been feeling. CBT also puts emphasis on the fact that we have our undesirable situations whether we allow them to upset us or not. Basically saying that if we are upset about our problems, we then have two problems: #1 the original problem, and #2 ourselves being upset about it....   [tags: Psychology]
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Psychotherapy - ... However, certain artful tactics involved in psychotherapy will never be entirely removed, such as the development of a therapeutic relationship (Allen, 2008). With the rise of EVT, there is a possibility that managed care may dictate the exact treatment techniques that must be used for a particular disorder, and then EVTs will be used as a form of restriction that will inhibit the use of the art of psychotherapy (Hopko & Hopko, 1999). One ideal way to prevent the complete loss of the art of psychotherapy is to use both the art and science together....   [tags: Psychology, Empirically Validated Treatments] 988 words
(2.8 pages)
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Talking Therapy - Verbal and non-verbal components commonly used in talking therapies can enhance the therapeutic value of dialogue. The theory and practice that underpins these components will be explored and critically debated in relation to metaphors and their meaning. Encouraging clients to become autonomous and self directed through an enhancement of responsibility for their therapy progression, is an approach that was first introduced by Carl Rogers in 1951 (Hough 2007). This Person-Centred approach permits the therapist to take a nondirective role, allowing clients to become their own person and fulfil their unique potential in therapy sessions (Nelson-Jones 2006)....   [tags: Psychology] 519 words
(1.5 pages)
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Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Key points: There were several key points described in this chapter that validated psychosocial treatments. This analysis will only focus on the discussion of the research study that focused on the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bipolar affective disorder. This chapter discussed a study of twenty-eight people (Cochran, 1984) who received outpatient CBT for a bipolar disorder diagnosis. The study was designed to change the way half of the participants (14) would think and behave so that they would better comply with their medication regime....   [tags: Papers] 5098 words
(14.6 pages)
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The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy - ... It helps the client show the actual situation by focusing on facts. The therapist uses an inductive method to help the client determine the elements that upset him. For support, the therapist can also introduce homework to the patient or client (Alexander, 2007). In general a lot can be said about the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy but almost all literature states a positive effect for this kind of therapy. The effectiveness holds for both clinical and non clinical settings. It hold also for people of all ages, although differences in how people react to the therapy can be contributed partially to the age of the person....   [tags: Health, Treatment] 2559 words
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The Integration of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Clinicians use three important techniques when working on resolving the client’s current depressive episode: role-play, encouraging affect, and communication analysis. Role-playing is used as a way to change the client’s behavior, and to uncover the client’s communication style. Once the client can see the ways in which they communicate ineffectively, they can work on new communication strategies in role-plays with the therapist. For example, if during role-plays the client discovers they are passive aggressive during fights with their partner, they can act out fights with the therapist and try different ways to communicate that change the outcome of the fight....   [tags: Psychology]
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2241 words
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Psychology Annotated Bibliography - ... Psychotherapy Research 15(1-2), 25-33. The authors of this article wanted to examine the relationship conditions, outcome, and working alliance significance in process-experiential psychotherapy (PET) and/or (CBT) cognitive behavioral psychotherapy. By examining the bond between a therapist and his client we can further understand how important the role of therapeutic alliance is in treatment outcome. The authors point out that therapeutic alliance plays a major positive impact on the outcome of therapy....   [tags: Bibliography ]
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1344 words
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Reflection Paper: active listening and rapport building - ... Both therapists established great rapport with their clients. Patricia remained in the exploration stage longer than Mary. However, as stated by Hill (2009), there will be flow in and out of the different stages. Insight and action do not always have to come only after exploration is complete (p. 37). In the session where I played the therapist, I found it easy to keep my attention on the client. However, there was a lot of list making and juggling in my head when she would say things that I wanted to revisit when she had a break in speech....   [tags: Psychology]
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1359 words
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Counseling Ethics Case Study - ... He has entered a dual relationship with Gwen that could potentially cause harm to her or create a conflict of interest. Since Ken is Gwen’s supervisor, he has more power over the relationship than Gwen does. This power can easily be abused by Ken, even if that was not his intent. Gwen might feel pressured into counseling or continuing her work with Ken because he is an authoritative figure to her. He might also present a biased decision because he thinks Gwen is a great counselor and does not want to see her quit, which could be the best thing for Gwen’s well-being....   [tags: Counseling ]
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Confidentiality in Counseling - ... Should the counselor tell Michael’s wife. Should the counselor have more details before making any decisions. There are several major issues that can arise when discussing confidentiality and a person who is HIV positive: the relationship between the counselor and client and the duty to treat, the measurement of the level of dangerousness, the presence of an identifiable third party that the client has been exposed to a level of dangerousness, and the counselor taking the appropriate steps to work with person who have HIV/AIDS (Cottone & Tarvydas, 2007)....   [tags: Counseling ]
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Event-Cognitive Theory - ... Some theorist would argue poking the bear is not the affective approach to any given situation. However, it is through complete analysis of past interpersonal interactions that will help the client recognize possible faulty thinking, creating a disruption in a client’s cognition resulting in undesirable behavior. For example, children who have been either sexually and or verbally abused exhibit undesirable behaviors as dictated by society. Applying Event-Cognitive Theory a counselor would work with the client to examine and analyze past events....   [tags: Psychology]
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Group Therapy Theory Comparison - looking for new and more effective ways to treat the issues of their clients, counselors and therapists may often begin to consider leading a group therapy session. Group therapy is a form of therapy in which a therapist either treats or provides psychoeducational skills to a small, carefully planned target group of individuals in an effort to ameliorate the issues and dysfunctions of each individual in that particular group of patients together (Scheidlinger, 2004). In this group, therapists often utilize some of the psychotherapy theories such as Gestalt, transactional analysis, psychotherapy or psychodrama which they often use to treat clients individually....   [tags: Psychology]
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Strangely Ordinary People - ... Because of his depression and self alienation from even his best friends and family as well as constant concern for him shown by his father, Conrad decides to go and see a psychiatrist. Dr. Berger, the local recommended psychiatrist, presents as a very busy lightly interested man. He is very casual, close to being too casual, who is open and blunt. His style of therapy relates closely to the Gestalt therapeutic approach. In the second session Dr. Berger starts talking about being awake, the here and now....   [tags: Movie Film Analysis]
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Good Will Hunting - Good Will Hunting is a film which conveys many interlocking themes and messages to its viewers. One of these nicely woven themes is placing trust in the people we care about as well as people we have only recently become acquainted with. Another message, arguably more significant than the last is finding and pursuing the potential one has and bringing meaning into our lives in any form we choose. I believe the potential and success this film demonstrates is that success, growth, and meaning in a person’s life does not always have to come in the form of advancing in a career or social status but rather in the form of overcoming hardships and developing close reciprocating relationships....   [tags: Film Analysis]
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Gestalt Therapy and Role Playing - Now, more than ever, with the gradual reduction of resources available to the social services department, the social workers no longer have the time available to devote to each individual client. A good alternative to this ever increasing dilemma is group treatment. Gestalt Therapy is a form of therapy which is used in group treatment and has enhanced progress in this area. German-born psychiatrist, Fritz Perls, conceptualized and developed this theory called Gestalt therapy. The German word gestalt cannot be translated into an equivalent, English term....   [tags: Gestalt theory, Therapy, Role Playing, psychology,]
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Using the Ethical Principles of the American Counseling Association - Using the Ethical Principles of the American Counseling Association Operating within the bounds of the principles asserted by the American Counseling Association (American Counseling Association [ACA], 2010) is a moral and ethical mandated for all counselors. Implementing the principles of, autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and fidelity can stimulate the creation of a healing environment wherein clients feel safe to explore the benefits of a therapeutic relationship (ACA, 2010). Often times, clients are unconsciously viewed and deemed vulnerable based on the severity of the circumstances that initiate the need for counseling....   [tags: Ethics ] 1771 words
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Music Therarpy - Music therapy is the prescribed use of music and musical interventions in order to restore, maintain, and improve emotional, physical, physiological, and spiritual health as well as a person’s well being. Music Therapy facilitates the creative process of moving toward wholeness in the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual self in areas such as: independence, freedom to change, adaptability, balance and integration. The implementation of Music Therapy involves interactions of the therapist, client and music....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Music Therapy for Autistic Children - ... III. Autism Autism has been found to be the fastest increasing medical problem after cancer (A-5). It has even been stated that “If autism does not affect your family now, it will. If something does not change – and change soon – this is almost a mathematical certainty.” (B-1). Finding the best treatment for an autistic child can cost over $100,000 per year (A-8). Music therapy helps because as autistic children withdraw from the outside world, and instrument is a non-threatening object that can get inside their own little world (M-2)....   [tags: Health, Treatment] 2102 words
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Definitions for Humor - ... Most of the risks involved deal with the therapist and his or her ability to competently and skillfully integrate humor into therapy as a means of benefiting the client. Both Prerost (1983) and Yonkovitz (1997) agreed that while humor cannot be taught, understanding when its use is appropriate (which can depend on the client’s humor style, the presenting problem, and the therapeutic relationship) must be developed. Gladding (1995) suggested using discretion, as an abundance of humor in therapy can sidetrack or stagnate the client’s growth in therapy....   [tags: Psychology]
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... Theory of Personality Trait theory is a major approach to the study of human personality. Trait theorists are concerned with human traits which define behavior, thoughts and emotions. Traits differ for people for example, some people are outgoing, other people are introverted. Traits are relatively stable over time and influence behavior. Traits are what make a person who they are. The main human traits are known as the Big Five are openness, Conscientiousness, Extroversion/introversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism or the acronym OCEAN....   [tags: Psychology]
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Music: The All Powerful Medicine - ... The findings were published by doctors at the Royal Free Hospital; they titled the paper The Lancet (Callous Disregard) and the children “The Lancet 12” (Callous Disregard). The Lancet Paper stated that “The children presented with autistic regression and gastrointestinal symptoms.” (Callous Disregaurd). As well as stating that “Had the children’s regression followed natural chicken pox, this book would never have been written. It didn’t; for nine children (as it turns out) behavior changes and subsequent development regression followed exposure to the MMR vaccine and thereby hangs this tale.” (Callous Disregard)....   [tags: Music ]
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Spiritual Needs and Occupational Therapy - ... In a study done by Donica (2008) it was defined and illustrated how to apply psycho spiritual integration clinically in occupational therapy practice. An independent single qualitative case study design was used in order to identify problems and occupational concerns of an individual aging after suffering from a stroke. A psycho spiritual integration frame of reference was a template for data collection. This framework is defined and applied to the participant’s life following the stroke. Therapists must have a thorough understanding of spirituality and how to incorporate it into practice....   [tags: Spirituality] 1351 words
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Divorce or Annulment - ... This provision perceives that forensic practice involves a relationship with patients that is different from a therapeutic practice. As Greenberg and Shuman (1997) state, these dual roles are incompatible. Chrisler and McCreary (2010) believe that this is a challenge in certain areas of forensic research that deals with the victimized, hospitalized and incarcerated populations. In some cases, the dual roles must be avoided to except in situations wherein the possible risks are outweighed by justification (p.590)....   [tags: Social Issues, Custody of the Children] 2021 words
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Adlerian Psychotherapy - Understand, interpret, direct. This statement is an oversimplification of sorts, but defines the essence of Adlerian psychotherapy. From this minimal overview of Adlerian theory, we can begin to elaborate and explore the intricacies of individual psychology. Adlerians are concerned with understanding the unique and private beliefs and strategies of the individual (private logic and mistaken notions) that we create in childhood, and which serve as a reference for attitudes, private views of self, others and the world, and behavior (lifestyle)....   [tags: Adlerian Psychotherapy]
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The Interrelationship Between Theories of Psychotherapy and the Techniques Used By Those Theories - ... “As long as a treatment makes sense to, is accepted by, and fosters the active engagement of the client, the particular treatment approach used is unimportant. In other words, therapeutic techniques are placebo delivery devices” (Anderson et al., 2010, p. 150). While I agree that most forms of therapy are equally effective, this statement is problematic. Mainly, it suggests that, as long as the client accepts the treatment, believes in it, and actively interacts with it, any treatment will be successful....   [tags: Article Review]
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Periodic Self-Assessment - ... Sometimes, I find myself too unhealthily engaged emotionally in her issues. The other four children are either in college or living on his or her own, but they still need Mom and Dad from time to time. Recently, I have experienced stress because of illnesses to my friends or their spouses. In the last six months, my good friend died of cancer within a six-month diagnosis; another good friend’s husband is meeting with a surgeon as I write this because he has prostate cancer; a co-worker’s husband who is 30 has just been diagnosed with cancer, and a small child in our church has been diagnosed with cancer....   [tags: Psychology]
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Short-term or Brief CounselingTherapy and the Current Mental Health System - Short-term or Brief CounselingTherapy and the Current Mental Health System Abstract “Short-term” or “Brief Counseling/Therapy” and the current mental health system seem to be inexorably linked for at least the foreseeable future. This paper discusses the history, objectives, appropriate clientele, efficacy, and the other benefits, and short comings, of this therapeutic/counseling modality and its relevance to my present career direction, College Counseling....   [tags: Papers] 3043 words
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REVIEW OF THE PROFILE OF CREATIVE ABILITIES - ... However, the standardization sample doesn't carefully match the U.S. Census when it comes to gender (e.g., 46% from the standardization sample are male whereas 51% from the U.S. school-age human population are male), and family earnings (30% from the sample possess a family earnings of $75,000 and also over whereas 19% of U.S. families come with an earnings within this upper range). Evidence meant for construct validity was supplied by study of group differentiation across different cohorts....   [tags: Assessment ]
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Three Main Approaches in Counseling Psychology - This essay will choose one of the three main approaches in counselling psychology. And comment on how and why you understand it to be effective. How has this approach developed over time. Who were the main practitioners responsible for creating this approach. The essay will explore What does it offer which is different to the other two main approaches the essay will also Consider aspects such as the therapeutic relationship versus the importance of techniques in bringing about positive change in the client (Relation ship) between Clint the therapist .Therapy Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) was an Austrian physician In 1900 he was both the medical doctor(nurologist) and philosopher, Fraud who was founder of the study of psychoanalysis also known as the study of the unconscious mind A key assumption of the psychoanalytic theory is that much of human behaviour is determined by unconscious thoughts, wishes, memories and so on....   [tags: Counseling Psychology] 2507 words
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Hippotherapy - ... Therefore, classical hippotherapy is based on German model and it involves one rider and one therapist. It is based on horse movement and patient’s response to the movement. Patient needs to do exercise and it can be positioned on horse in different directions or it can lie or sit on a horse. Thus, “this therapy, based on the positive effect of the horse’s movement on the person, is beneficial for the rehabilitation of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and cardiopulmonary dysfunctions” (Granados and Agis 192)....   [tags: Health, Animals]
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Therapeutic Writing - ... Consequently, none of the participants’ behaviors changed permanently. However, the study participants articulated that blogging was therapeutic in nature. Ethical Considerations Advocates for writing and blogging in therapy offer recommendations for therapists in reference to ethical challenges that may arise. Consistent in blogging and journal writing research literature is the discussion of privacy and confidentiality. Baikie and Wilhelm (2005) suggest informing clients that their writing does not need to be shared....   [tags: Counseling ]
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A Case Study Depicting the Importance of Ethics in Medicine - To protect the individual’s right and confidentiality, the client involved would be referred to as ‘Marge’. Introduction ‘Work for health requires moral commitment’ (Seedhouse, 2009 p. xiviii). Therefore, the obligation rests on healthcare professionals faced with ethical dilemma in their practice to make moral decision which should promote and enhance health ( Rumbold, 1999; Sim, 1997). Ethics is concerned with the basis on which an action is determined as either right or wrong (Rumbold, 1999; MacIntyre, 2005)....   [tags: Medical Ethics, Nursing]
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4552 words
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Home of the Brave - ... According to Hutchinson, the meaning of post traumatic stress is “a set of symptoms experienced by some trauma survivors that include reliving the traumatic event, avoidance of stimuli related to the event and hyperarousal” (Hutchinson, 2008, p.604). Will appeared to be in denial with his feelings regarding the experiences he faced while at war. Part of Will denial progressed to where he began abusing alcohol. Again this was Will’s method of suppressing his feelings regarding the ordeal he faced at war and to face the reality of life after the war....   [tags: Film Analysis ]
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