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Buddhism - The Question is Buddhism Why. It can be a simple question to answer with something to the affect of, “just because”. To most of us however, this question at some point in our lives, or at this very moment, has plagued us and consumed countless hours of our deepest thoughts. Many have lost sleep over this grouping of 3 random letters from the English alphabet because it is the question that seems impossible to concretely answer. This has been the cause of the birth for numerous religions across the globe and throughout history....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1182 words
(3.4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Many people interpret Buddha as a big fat guy, that will give you luck if you rub his belly. This may be true, but Buddhism is much bigger than that. Buddhism began in Himalaya region and has been around since the first century. In Buddhism, the nature of God is a man named Shakyamuni Buddha. In this paper, we are going to look a little more into Buddhism. We will review responses from an actual Buddhism worshipper. We will also compare Buddhism to other religions. Although the Buddha was apparently an historical figure, what we know about him is sketchy....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1762 words
(5 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism, like most other religions, originated in a particular place at a particular time, and its roots are in forms and ideas that were part of the environment in which it developed. The most important of these areas at the time of the Buddha was the valley of the Ganges river which flows from west to east across most of northern India. It was here that the great religions of India first arose and flourished. Only later did they spread to the south. In the time of the Buddha, about 500 B.C.E., this area was undergoing a period of vigorous religious development....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1056 words
(3 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism As a college student that has lived and grown up in western New York, I do not have too much experience with the other religions of the world. I have grown up a Christian Protestant my whole life, and I am a firm believer in my religion. Soon after reading the chapter on Buddhism in Huston Smith’s book The World’s Religions, I came to understand and respect the Buddhist religion. I came to learn who the Buddha as a man really was, and the steps he took in becoming a religious icon. I know understand that Buddhism is not all meditation and relaxing....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1605 words
(4.6 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism What is Buddhism. Buddhism is a philosophy of life, it was started by Siddhartha Gotma , who is more commonly known as Buddha. Buddha isn’t god to them however he is well respected for passing down knowledge of how to find true happiness. The Buddhists major aim in life is to find enlightenment (true happiness).Buddhist monks live by a strict moral code, in which they are given food, they live a life structured around the teachings of Buddha. Who was Buddha. Siddhartha Gotama was born into a rich royal family, located in Nepal in 563 BC....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1527 words
(4.4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism is the great oriental religion founded by Guatama Buddha, who lived and taught in India in the sixth century BC All Buddhists trace their faith to Buddha and "revere" his person (Frederic 15). Nearly all types of Buddhism include monastic orders whose members serve as teachers and clergy to the lay community (Maraldo 19). However, beyond these common features the numerous sects of modern Buddhism exhibit great variety in their beliefs and practices. In its oldest surviving form, known as Theravada or Hinayana....   [tags: Buddhism India Buddha Religion Essays]
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1175 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism “Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future; it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.” Albert Einstein (Buddhism) Buddhism has affected many people. From the Buddha’s first followers to my next door neighbor, people everywhere have followed the teachings of Buddhism....   [tags: Religion Religious Buddhist Buddhism Essays]
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3724 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism is probably the most tolerant religion in the world, as its teachings can coexist with any other religion's. However, this is not a characteristic of other religions. The Buddhist teaching of God is neither agnostic nor vague, but clear and logical. Buddhism was created by Siddhartha Gautama, who was born in the sixth century B.C. in what is now modern Nepal. Siddhartha grew up living the extravagant life of a young prince. His father was Suddhodana and was the ruler of the Sakya people....   [tags: Synopsis Research Paper Religion Buddhism] 910 words
(2.6 pages)
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Buddhism Breaks Apart - Buddhism Breaks Apart Buddhism is the religion of spiritual enlightenment through the suppressing of one’s worldly desires. Buddhism takes one on the path of a spiritual journey, to become one with their soul. It teaches one how to comprehend life’s mysteries, and to cope with them. Founded in 525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama; Theravada Buddhism is the first branch of Buddhism; it was a flourishing religion in India before the invasions by the Huns and the Muslims, and Mahayana Buddhism formed due to new locations, it was altered according to local influences....   [tags: Buddhism]
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1388 words
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The Dharma of Mahayana Buddhism - Advanced technology and luxurious items seem bring humans into a “Modern World.” However, it seems these 21st Century technologies and items have brought more dissatisfaction, the duhkha. Death, blood and war, these words appear in the newspaper almost everyday. Despite those external dissatisfactions, internally human kind becomes more selfish and lonely. As a matter of fact, a hypochondria is becoming so popular that one in seven adults is facing it. In our society today, Buddhism, especially Mahayana Buddhism, becomes a cure to the duhkha that we are facing today....   [tags: Buddhism] 1067 words
(3 pages)
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Animals In Buddhism - When my family first arrived in the dirty city of Bangkok, one of the first things my little sister asked me was “Why are there so many dogs everywhere?” Being the dog lover that she is, she was extremely disappointed to learn that these dogs were not only nobody’s pets, but that she also couldn’t pet them unless she wanted to get some weird fungus or sickness on the first couple days of her vacation. As I explained to them that the reason for all the dogs was because Thailand is mainly Buddhist and it is not in their fashion to kill these dogs, they still had a hard time accepting this fact seeing how miserable many of them look....   [tags: Animals Buddhism Karma] 1918 words
(5.5 pages)
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Buddhism and No-Self - Eastern enlightenment religions have been gaining popularity throughout the western world for the past few decades, with many people attracted to a "different" way of experiencing religion. As with many other enlightenment religions, Buddhism requires disciples to understand concepts that are not readily explainable: one such concept is that of no-self. In this essay I shall discuss the no-self from a number of modern perspectives; however, as no-self is difficult to describe I shall focus on both the self and no-self....   [tags: Religion Religious Buddhism] 1950 words
(5.6 pages)
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Buddhism And The Four Principle Beliefs - BUDDHISM AND THE FOUR PRINCIPLE BELIEFS Buddhism, with about 365 million followers makes up 6% of the world's population and is the fourth largest religion in the world (exceeded by Christianity, Islam and Hinduism). Buddhism was founded in Northern India in the sixth century BCE by the first Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama when he attained enlightenment. Buddhism is made up three main forms. They are Theravada Buddhism found mainly in Thailand, Burma, Cambodia and Laos, Mahayana Buddhism which is largely found in China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia and Vajrayana Buddhism....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1545 words
(4.4 pages)
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A Life of Celibacy; Buddhism and Sex - A Life of Celibacy; Buddhism and Sex Buddhism which just may be the most tolerant religion in the world, constitutes teachings that can coexist with almost any other religions. Buddhism began with Siddhartha Gautama who lived in northern India in the sixth or fifth century B.C.E. The religion has guidelines in two forms in which Buddhist followers must follow. These are the Four Noble Truths and the Eight fold Path. Buddha taught that man is a slave to his ego and that the cause of suffering is desire, essentially the way to end suffering is to overcome desire....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1901 words
(5.4 pages)
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Theravada And Mahayana Buddhism - There are many interpretations of core teachings in most major religions. In Christianity, there was a major split over such teachings which resulted in Catholicism and Protestantism, and then within the Protestant church again which resulted in many differing views on foundational teachings. So it is with Buddhism. Buddha is born in 6th century B.C. as Siddhartha Gautama to a high caste of warriors, Kshatriya. It is said that as a child, he was inspected by a sage and found to be marked, indicating he would be an illustrious person (Experiencing World Religions, pg.121)....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1351 words
(3.9 pages)
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The American Encounter With Buddhism - Before reading "The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent" by Thomas A. Tweed I had no experience with Buddhism except for what I have seen in the movies and in the media. Seeing Buddhism through these different sources, it does not portray an accurate illustration of what the religion is truly regarding. Having little to no knowledge about the background of the religion makes reading this book both interesting and a little difficult to read at the same time....   [tags: Tweed Buddhism Religion] 1390 words
(4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism According to Webster's definition, Buddhism is not a religion. It states that religion is the "belief in or worship of God or gods"(Webster's New World Dictionary pg.505). "The Buddha was not a god"(About Buddhism pg.1). " There is no theology, no worship of a deity or deification of the Buddha"(Butter pg.1) in Buddhism. Therefore "Buddhists don't pray to a creator god"(Buddhism FAQ's pg.1). Consequently, Buddhism is catagorized as a philosophy, but is still regarded it as a religion....   [tags: Papers] 1890 words
(5.4 pages)
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Buddhism - From the beginning of time, many religious groups and colts have formed. Today there are several different colts and religions. There is one that some people really don’t have the clear and defined meaning of. This belief is Buddhism. In the following paragraphs you will learn more about the meaning of Buddhism, where it originates from and the many different Buddhist schools around the world. Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual growth that shows the true nature of life. Some of the Buddhist practices (such as meditation) are ways of changing people in order to develop awareness, kindness, and wisdom....   [tags: essays research papers] 550 words
(1.6 pages)
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Comparing Buddhism and Christianity - Comparing Buddhism and Christianity In the early sixth century Christianity was evolving at a rapid pace. The spread of Christianity was not only moving westward through Europe, but it was also moving eastward down the Silk Road. The eastward spread of Christianity was primarily a form of Christianity known as Nestorianism, after the teachings of Nestorius, a fifth century patriarch. By 635 Nestorian Christianity had reached the heart of China spreading through all of Persia and India. During the middle of the seventh century Nestorian churches were found in cities all along the Silk Road, though there were unquestionably many fewer Christians than Buddhists in Asia Up until the turn of the sixteenth century Christianity endured great persecution in China and Japan....   [tags: Religion Buddhism Christianity Essays]
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buddhism - Buddhism is a major religion, founded in northeastern India. Buddhism was based on the teachings of Siddhartha Guatama, who is known as “Buddha” The Enlightened one. Buddha is divided into two major groups known as “The way of the Elders” and “Mahayana” the great vehicle. Siddhartha Guatama was born in 563 BC in Kapilavastu near the Indian-Nepal border. The young prince withdrew all his luxury and went on a quest for peace and enlightenment. When he attained the enlightenment he had been seeking, Buddha began to preach....   [tags: essays research papers] 388 words
(1.1 pages)
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Buddhism - ... The strong emphasis of truth means that one must come to understand one their own: “Buddhism encourages us not to believe what we’ve been told is the truth, but instead to seek the truth through our own experience.” The third and fourth reasons for the acceptance of biological evolution are the general acceptance of impermanence and the belief in continuity of evolution and dharma. Spirits and beings continue to evolve throughout time and there is never one entity that stays the same no matter what....   [tags: Religion]
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1899 words
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buddhism - Zen; Buddhism's trek through history, politics, and America Zen, or Zenno (as it is known by the Japanese word from which it derives), is the most common form of Buddhism practiced in the world today. All types of people from intellectuals to celebrities refer to themselves as Buddhist, but despite its popularity today in America, it has had a long history throughout the world. "Here none think of wealth or fame, All talk of right and wrong is quelled. In Autumn I rake the leaf-banked stream, In spring attend the nightingale....   [tags: essays research papers] 1222 words
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Buddhism - People around the world speak of American influence in politics, business, and merchandise. The terms ‘globalization’ or ‘global interdependence’ are recently being more understood by most when defining them with relation to corporations, environmental issues, and the modern economy. Can these terms be used to describe the religious beliefs in Canada. The religious life of North American society does not find its roots here at home. We live in a Christian domain. Its roots are 2000 years old and lie half way around the world....   [tags: essays research papers] 1142 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism, one of the major religions of the world, was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, who lived in northern India from 560 to 480 B.C. The time of the Buddha was one of social and religious change, marked by the further advance of Aryan Civilization into the Ganges Plain, the development of trade and cities, the breakdown of old tribal structures, and the rise of a whole spectrum of new religious movements that responded to the demands of the times (Conze 10). These movements were derived from the Brahmanic tradition of Hinduism but were also reactions against it....   [tags: essays research papers] 1383 words
(4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism is a unique religion. The teacher of Buddhism is Siddahartha Gautama Buddha. Siddahartha was the son of the king of Nepal. Buddha’s father was warned that his son was going to become a monarch and that he would be murdered. So, Siddaharta’s father imprisoned him within the palace so that he would never see anyone suffer or grow old. When Siddaharta grew older, he wanted to know what it was like on the other side of the palace walls; just like we all think the grass is greener on the other side....   [tags: Papers] 1295 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism is a strict religion with restrictions that determines how a follower of the religion must live life. Buddhism is a large part of culture and society in south- eastern Asian countries. In the western hemisphere, there are simply not enough Buddhists to have a large impact on western society. A Buddhists ultimate goal is to reach their state of nirvana. To reach this state, their life is guided by firm presets. Buddhists believe that their lives they are living now were shaped in a previous life....   [tags: essays research papers] 358 words
(1 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism: Things I Find Interesting As I was reading the selected portions of the book for this chapter, I came across a few things that I found interesting. At first I did not catch them, but after I went back and reread the selections, I found these things, that I thought were intriguing. Buddhism is supposedly a non-theistic religion. However, in the reading titled "The Majjhim-Nikaya: Questions Which Lend Not to Edification" (5.1) and in "Realizing the Four Noble Truths" (5.3, the Buddha is continually referred to as "The Blessed One"....   [tags: essays research papers] 389 words
(1.1 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism For over 2000 years Buddhism has existed as an organized religion. By religion we mean that it has a concept of the profane, the sacred, and approaches to the sacred. It has been established in India, China, Japan and other eastern cultures for almost 2000 years and has gained a strong foothold in North America and Europe in the past few centuries. However, one might ask; what fate would Buddhism face had Siddartha Guatama been born in modern times; or more specifically in modern day North America....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Buddhism - High in the mountains of the Himalayas chants ring out from the Tibetan monastery. For most this is a dream-like vacation to a far away land. For some of the people who live in Tibet and India this is everyday life as a Buddhist. Buddhism revolves around a strict code of daily rituals and meditations. To an outsider they can seem mystical or even odd, but these are the paths to enlightenment and spiritual salvation. Throughout the centuries, Buddhism has evolved into a major religion in Asia and other parts of the world....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism is one of the biggest religions founded in India in the 6th and 5th cent. BC by Siddhartha Gautama, called the Buddha. One of the great Asian religions teaches the practice of the observance of moral precepts. The basic doctrines include the four noble truths taught by the Buddha. Since it was first introduced into China from India, Buddhism has had a history that has been characterized by periods of sometimes awkward and irregular development. This has mainly been the result of the clash of two cultures, each with a long history of tradition....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Buddhism - Buddhism Works Cited Missing Buddhism is the religion of about one eighth of the world's people (Gaer 27). Buddhism is the name for a complex system of beliefs developed around the teachings of a single man. The Buddha, whose name was Siddhartha Gautama, lived 2,500 years ago in India. There are now dozens of different schools of Buddhist philosophy throughout Asia. These schools, or sects, have different writings and languages and have grown up in different cultures. There is no one single "Bible" of Buddhism, but all Buddhists share some basic beliefs....   [tags: Papers Religion India Essays Religious] 2242 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism has grown to become a major world religion since its founding by Siddharta Gautama, known as the Buddha, in 5th and 6th centuries. It now has over 300 million followers. Buddha, or enlightened one, was born around 563 BC in the town of Kapilavastu, what is now Nepal. He was born a prince, son to King Siddhartha and Queen Maya. He was raised in the palace and never left the grounds. At the age of 29, he ventured from there. Outside of the city he saw four things that changed his life: He saw old age, sickness, death, and a holy man....   [tags: Papers] 593 words
(1.7 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Illusions In life, too many things are taken for granted. We take for granted the most valuable things in our life; the love from our families and friends, the roof over our heads, and even the air we breathe. Unfortunately, most people don’t appreciate what they have until it’s gone. So many people have become victims of depression, aggression, loneliness and selfishness. All around the world, especially in America, people are suffering. Thanks to the nightly news we are constantly reminded of all the insanity and corruption that surrounds us....   [tags: Papers] 909 words
(2.6 pages)
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Buddhism - Everything is suffering. Humans define their existence by misery and suffering. The four Noble Truths are all about suffering. Suffering, the origin of suffering, Nibbana, and the Path. The word suffering is utilized throughout all the texts and teachings of Buddhism. Suffering is defined as; to feel pain or distress; sustain loss, injury, harm, or punishment. Buddhist uses a deeper meaning of suffering, which is a change or ultimate unsatisfactory. Even if one is happy they can not be happy forever, so when they are no longer happy they are suffering....   [tags: essays research papers] 668 words
(1.9 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism In reading this account on Buddhism, the goal is, for you (the reader) to understand a fascinating belief system, that has been around since before Christ ever set foot on this earth. This will provide a connection to the minds and hearts of the people who live and die in this sacred world, so that an understanding may be arroused and ultimatly give an acceptance as well as a clear path to minister to these people. The most important aspect of reaching out to people of other cults or religions could possibly be an understanding and common ground with your neighbor....   [tags: essays research papers] 3679 words
(10.5 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Incomplete Essay Buddhism is one of the major world state religions. It is also one of the oldest in the world. It began over 2000 years ago in northeast India, with the teachings of Siddharta Gautama the founder, otherwise known as the Buddha. Buddhism has spread all over India and through the Himalayan Mountain passes into China, Tibet, Korea, Japan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, and Vietnam, Europe, USA, and even Australia. The number of Buddhists in the world is estimated to be about 300 million....   [tags: Papers] 956 words
(2.7 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism, founded in the late 6th century B.C.E. by Siddhartha Gautama (the "Buddha"), is an important religion in most of the countries of Asia. Buddhism has assumed many different forms, but in each case there has been an attempt to draw from the life experiences of the Buddha, his teachings, and the "spirit" or "essence" of his teachings (called dhamma or dharma) as models for the religious life. However, not until the writing of the Buaciha Charija (life of the Buddha) by Ashvaghosa in the 1st or 2nd century C.E....   [tags: Papers] 876 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism Works Cited Not Included Buddhism is one of the biggest religions founded in India in the 6th and 5th century B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama, also known as “the Buddha.” As one of the greatest Asian religion, it teaches the practice and the observance of moral perceptions. “Buddhism begins with a man. In his later years, when India was afire with his message, people came to him asking what he was....   [tags: Papers Religion Buddha Essays Papers] 3222 words
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Christianity And Buddhism Compared - Buddhist and Christian Prayer: A Comparison in Practice and Purpose At first glance the traditions of Christianity and Buddhism appear very different from each other. One centers around a God that was at one time physically manifest on earth in the human form of his "son" Jesus Christ, the other primarily worships a historical figure that gained divine status through enlightenment. This assessment is broad at best, especially in the case of Buddhism where the Theravada and Mahayana traditions differ significantly....   [tags: Comparison Religion Christianity Buddhism] 1502 words
(4.3 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Gautama Buddha, previously known as Prince Siddhartha (before his enlightenment) founded the religion of Buddhism. Gautama Buddha was born to Queen Maha-Maya at Kapilavastu, Nepal, Indian. Buddha taught and organized the Sangha, monastic orders, until his death at Kusinagara, at the age of 80. There are 308,000,000 Buddhist devotees in the world today. They believe that there has been Buddha before Him; Bodhisattvas who come as Saviors of all and that all beings are Buddha whether they realize it or not....   [tags: Religion Buddha Essays] 2602 words
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Buddhism - Before Buddha had started teaching, many people were ignorant of their feelings and could not understand a lot of their senses. Before Buddha, people suffered without understanding why. Buddha taught people how to release themselves from this daily suffering. They learned that the pathway to self-righteousness was bordered with the release from suffering. Buddha’s way of life has benefited the whole world because now people can choose to understand why we are suffering, and how we can be released from it....   [tags: essays research papers] 915 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism In a world filled with technology and industry, it can become increasingly difficult to take a step back and view the world in its natural state. In essence, we are humans trying to figure out how we fit into a world seemingly contradictory to the path of humanity. We look to nature for answers. We look to each other, as well as to one another’s accomplishments for these same answers. In the end, our entire species comes to the same conclusion. In order to fully understand our world, we must first seek inner-peace and come to understand how we can relate to one another on a spiritual level....   [tags: Papers] 6632 words
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Buddhism - In the early parts of my life, I learned about all of the laws that restrict our actions, as practitioners of Buddhism. I was educated about the four basic truths that all Buddhists believe. The four basic truths are Dukkha, Samudaya, Nirodha, and Marga (Anderson 24). Dukkha, or its meaning in English, suffering, tells of all the frustration in life. In order to find the end of suffering, I found that one must review the purpose for the suffering to being in one’s life (Harvey 49). the second holy truth, Samudaya deals with the origin of suffering....   [tags: essays research papers] 769 words
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Buddhism - Buddhism 1.) The First Noble Truth - "Dukkha" A.) The First Noble Truth seems to be an intrinsic understanding that all things are impermanent. This impermanence causes us to feel frustrated when we can't hold on to people or things we think we need. This need helps us feel wanted and/or important. Dukkha can also be described as the suffering we experience and see in our lives. Unpleasant conditions such as being sick, seeing our loved ones get sick and die, getting aggravated over things our children do, losing a job, etc....   [tags: essays research papers] 1851 words
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Buddhism - The origin, traditional Buddhism began in the 6th century BC with the historical personage born Siddhartha Gautama, but better known by a variety of titles including Shakyammi, Tathagata, or most commonly Buddha, the enlightened one. The legend of the Buddha’s life has acquired plenty of variations and embellishments over the years, but the basic facts are accepted as traditional, including the dates of his birth and death (563-489 BC by Western reckoning, 624-544 according to Sri Lankan tradition)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Sacred Books In Hinduism And Buddhism - Sacred Books, in my opinion, are the most important things that can preserve the knowledge of religion. When transmitted orally certain interpretations may occur, especially when translated into different languages. India was a mother of many religions, particularly Hinduism and Buddhism. Hinduism “has no one identifiable founder, no strong organizational structure to defend it and spread its influence, nor any creed to define and stabilize its beliefs; and in a way that seems to defy reason, Hinduism unites the worship of many gods with a belief in a single divine reality.” (Molloy: 74) The Hindu scriptures are divided into two parts, the shrutis (what is heard) and the smritis (what is remembered)....   [tags: Hinduism Buddhism Religion ] 1581 words
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Buddhism Vs Christianity - Religion is a fundamental element of human society. It is what binds a country, society or group of individuals together. However, in some instances it destroys unity amoungst these. Religion is a belief in a superhuman entity(s) which control(s) the universe. Every religion has its differences but most strive for a just life and the right morals. The three major groups are the primal regions which consist of African, Aboriginal and Native American religions, Asian which consist of South Eastern Asian religions and Abrahamic religions which consist of Middle Eastern religions....   [tags: Comparison Religion Buddhism Christianity] 1047 words
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Comparison of Buddhism and Hinduism - Comparison of Buddhism and Hinduism “Thank goodness for eastern religion, I’m going to yoga class now and I redid my room to improve like my Zen, it really works…” for many in the western world, this is the most that is understood about eastern religions, particularly Buddhism and Hinduism. Although many would be interested to know that yoga is not just an exercise class; there are many more important details about Buddhism and Hinduism we are misinformed about, Especially, the differences of these two religions....   [tags: Buddhism Hinduism Compare Contrast Religion] 1007 words
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The spread and localization of Buddhism and Islam into Southeast Asia - ... Till this day, Theravada Buddhism persists predominant in Southeast Asia. Theravada Buddhism focuses their beliefs on the personal liberation whilst Mahayana Buddhism regards itself on the teaching of compassion for every living being (Berzin 2010). The spread of Buddhism, mainly Theravada, first began around early 3rd century BCE when Buddhist emissaries were sent to Indonesia and Burma by Indian emperor Asoka (Gosling 2002, 84-85). During and after his reign, his constant advocacy had sustained the faith’s position throughout Southeast Asia, influencing his children to introduce Buddhism into Sri Lanka during the first and second century CE (Gosling 2002, 82) which spread across to Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam (Swearer 1997, 90)....   [tags: Religion, Buddhism, Islam] 677 words
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Notions of Selflessness in Sartrean Existentialism and Theravadin Buddhism - Notions of Selflessness in Sartrean Existentialism and Theravadin Buddhism ABSTRACT: In this essay I examine the relationship between Sartre's phenomenological description of the "self" as expressed in his early work (especially Being and Nothingness) and elements to be found in some approaches to Buddhism. The vast enormity of this task will be obvious to anyone who is aware of the numerous schools and traditions through which the religion of Buddhism has manifested itself. In order to be brief, I have decided to select specific aspects of what is commonly called the Theravadin tradition as being representative of Buddhist philosophy....   [tags: Buddhism Sartre Essays]
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Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism: Similar Views of Life - Buddhism According to Communication between cultures by Larry A.Samovar, Richard E. Porter and Edwin R.McDaniel, Buddhism was originated in Indian by the prince named Siddharth Guatama in about 563 B.C. Siddharth was born into a great luxury. He was married and by the age of 29 disillusioned with his opulence and ventured out of his palace. For the first time, the prince was encountered old age, sickness, and death. He was so moved with the painful realities of life that he left his wife and comfortable home to search for an end to human suffering....   [tags: religion, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, ]
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How Does Buddhism Relate And Help To Formulate A Local Understanding Of Transsexuals In Thailand - How does Buddhism relate and help to formulate a local understanding of Transsexuals in Thailand. Thailand beholds the highest rate of Transsexuals throughout the world. According to Sam Winter, the numbers differ from about 10,000 to (unofficial) 300,000. Even if the number of 10,000 was "an accurate one, it would still represent an incidence substantially above that estimated for transgender in most other parts of the world" (6). To explain the case for this high number of transsexuals, I will refer to the impact of localization of Buddhism in Thailand and how it leads to the understanding of transsexuals in the current day....   [tags: Religion Buddhism Gender] 1873 words
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Zen Buddhism In Japan - Art would not usually dare comment on life's ugliness that is all over the world when people are not ready to accept it; it is much more safe to comment on the beauty instead. In fact, being shattered by the loss of a child is not a subject usually addressed by this medium, but Bergman does confront the issue of postpartum depression in Persona. The inner struggles of two very different, yet strikingly similar women erupt in Persona. Elizabeth's withdrawal from society does not protect her from the pain she is feeling over her loss....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1673 words
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Buddhism - Every Moment We Live is an Opportunity (for understanding) - Every Moment We Live is an Opportunity (for understanding) Something that interests us all is ourselves - because we are the subject and main focus of our lives. No matter what you think of yourself, there is a natural interest because you have to live with yourself for a lifetime. The self view is therefore something that can give us a lot of misery if we see ourselves in the wrong way. Even under the best of circumstances, if we don't see ourselves in the right way we still end up creating suffering in our minds....   [tags: Buddhism] 862 words
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Nietzsche On Buddhism - Nietzsche repeatedly refers to Buddhism as a decadent and nihilistic religion. It seems to be a textbook case of just what Nietzsche is out to remedy in human thinking. It devalues the world as illusory and merely apparent, instead looking to an underlying reality for value and meaning. Its stated goals seem to be negative and escapist, Nietzsche sometimes seems to praise certain aspects of Buddhist teaching—and some of his own core ideas bear a resemblance to Buddhist doctrine. What exactly is Nietzsche’s evaluation of Buddhism....   [tags: Religion] 1686 words
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Buddhism in Vietnam - Buddhism in Vietnam The Vietnamese people have said to have first appeared in the Christian era, because the religion that was first adapted was Christianity. This would explain why the Vietnamese people are such religious people. But it does not really explain there major religion change to Buddhism, because Buddhism is really not a religion that is native to Vietnam. Buddhism my be one of the most known religions in the world by name, but not by what is actually involved in it. Christine the girl that I interview said “that many people think that the religion is a cult but she says that it is anything but what would be classified as a cult to Americans (Eng).” ‘“Historically, Buddhism played a significant role in the definition of the classical South East Asian states....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Buddhism in China - Buddhism in China Between the third and ninth centuries C.E. China underwent a number of changes in its cultural makeup. Foremost amongst them was the adoption of Buddhist religious practices. I must stress that this was not a formal or universal change in religion but a slow integration of a system that permitted adaptation of its own form to promote acceptance as long as the fundamental theories and practices remained the same, unlike most religions. Buddhism worked its way into the court and decision makers of the Chinese state and that was the major sticking point for the religion in China....   [tags: Papers] 807 words
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Buddhism in the West - Albert Einstein once said, “the religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend a personal god, avoid dogmas and theology. Covering both the natural and spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all natural and spiritual and a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that would cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism.”# Many great minds like Albert Einstein have converted or become Buddhists....   [tags: essays research papers] 1128 words
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Korean Buddhism - Korean Buddhism Buddhism was first brought from China to the Korean peninsula in the year 372 CE. At this time the dominant and traditional religion was Shamanism. While Shamanism was the belief in animism and nature-spirit worship, Buddhism expressed the idea that human beings as well as nature possess spirits and should be included in the rites of worship. This had no conflict with Shamanism and so it was easily adapted. The early elementary forms of Buddhism believed primarily in cause and effect related to the path of happiness (Buddhapia)....   [tags: Religion Korea Religious Essays]
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Zen Buddhism - Ch’an and Zen Buddhism Throughout the early years in many East Asian countries, there were many people who were looking for answers to this world’s, and otherworldly, questions. When Gotama became enlightened, and began preaching the practices of Buddhism, it came at such a time when the Han dynasty was collapsing, citizens were tired of Confucianism and looking for a new ideology that they could put there hearts and souls into. Over the years, Buddhism proved to be much more than just a religion; it became a way of life....   [tags: essays research papers] 1937 words
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The Spread of Buddhism - The Spread of Buddhism Buddhism is a philosophy, a moral code, and, for some a religious faith which originated in 530 BC in India. Buddhism evolved as a modification of Hinduism when Hinduism started to become very complicated due to too many sacrifices in the name of God. Today, an estimated 300 million people follow one of the many varieties of Buddhism. Budda, or Siddhartha Guatama which means "the awakened one" had the religion named after him because he founded the ideas behind Buddhism....   [tags: Papers] 1143 words
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What Is Buddhism? - What is Buddhism. Buddhism is a path of teaching and practice. Buddhist practices such as meditation are means of changing oneself in order to develop the qualities of awareness, kindness, and wisdom. The experience developed within the Buddhist tradition over thousands of years has created an incomparable resource for all those who wish to follow the path of spiritual development. Ultimately, the Buddhist path culminates in Enlightenment or Buddhahood. Who was the Buddha. The word Buddha is a title not a name....   [tags: essays research papers] 1037 words
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Shintoism and Buddhism - Shintoism and Buddhism The Japanese religions, including Shintosim and Buddhism, are rich and complex, and it contains many condradictory trends which may puzzle a Westerner. In the center of the tradition is Shinto, the "natural" religion of Japan. Also in the center is Buddhism, the Indian religion that was brought to Japan in the sixth century from Korea and China. Throughout the history of Japan, it has been these two religions that have contributed most to the Japanese understanding of themselves and their surroundings, and also to many important events....   [tags: Papers] 1195 words
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Women in Buddhism - Women in Buddhism The role of women in religion, especially Eastern religions, is a strange one. Western religions are fairly straightforward about a women's place. For example, most Western religions (excluding the Roman Catholic Church) allow women in leadership roles within the religious community. Judaism allows women rabbis, most Christian religions allow women ministers, and even Islam, which does not allow women mullah, have had many influential female sufi's throughout Islamic history....   [tags: Religion Religious Philosophy Essays]
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Hinduism and Buddhism - Hinduism and Buddhism Works Cited Not Included      Throughout the world, different nations have different beliefs or religion. Some religions evolve from others, and others are combination of other religions. Religion is a way of life, a lifestyle; it should dictate how you live your life. For instance, in India, Buddhism evolved from Hinduism, a religion were people believe in 300, 000 gods. Even though, Hinduism and Buddhism have different similarities such as believes in god, soul, and rituals, which in some ways connected to each other, both religions believe of what happens after life....   [tags: Religion Religious Essays Papers] 1023 words
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Hinduism and Buddhism - Hinduism and Buddhism The concept of God It is first of all necessary to establish what is meant by the term "God". This term is used to designate a Supreme Being endowed with the qualities of omnipotence and omniscience, which is the creator of the universe with all its contents, and the chief lawgiver for humans. God is generally considered as being concerned with the welfare of his human creatures, and the ultimate salvation of those who follow his dictates. God is therefore a person of some kind, and the question whether such an entity exists or not is fundamental to all theistic systems....   [tags: Religion religious Compare Contrast Essays]
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Buddhism And Islam - Buddhism and Islam Religion is defined as "the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God" . There are many recognised religions of the world, which all teach its followers to live life "the right way", whose definition varies according to the religion itself. They have some beliefs and practices that distinguish themselves from each other. Some examples are differences and similarities of Buddhism and Islam. Buddhism originated from India, and was founded by Prince Siddharta Gautama, who later came to be known as Buddha, or the enlightened one....   [tags: Religion Muhammad Buddha Essays]
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Buddhism in "Animekalai" - Religion is a strong aspect in most people's lives, and it can be as complicated as being in a theater play or movie or as simple as merely having faith in a certain belief or figure. It can be analogous to acting in that much practice is needed to perfect your faith and corresponding rituals since there may be countless rituals and steps to the religion that needs to be performed and remembered very precisely. Also, to fully play your role in that theater play or movie, you may need to do some research and learn about the character as much as possible....   [tags: World Literature] 1277 words
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Confucianism And Buddhism - Are Confucianism and Buddhism religions. To answer this question one must first find the definition of the word religion. According to our text book the word religion come from the Latin word religio which means awe for the gods and concern for proper ritual (experiencing the worlds religion 3). The definition of the word religion according to several dictionaries is a belief in a divine or superhuman power or powers to be obeyed and worshiped as the creator and the ruler of the universe, or any specific systems of belief, worship or conduct often involving a code of ethics and philosophy....   [tags: Comparative Religion] 973 words
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The Evolution of Buddhism - ... Professor Ch’en describes the four noble truths best when ha says “Life is suffering. Suffering has a cause. Suffering can be suppressed. The way to suppression of suffering is the noble eight fold path, which consists of right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration,” (CH'EN 33). The teachings of the Buddha held a person to high morals and conduct. If a person went against these values, it would be considered the ultimate sin and would, therefore, be trapped in the vicious cycle of rebirth....   [tags: Religion]
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Hinduism and Buddhism - ... This particular discipline is known as yoga. Like many practices in religions, there are different types of yoga that individuals do in order to maintain development. The first is the karma yoga which represents one’s ritual action, meaning fulfilling one’s social role. Secondly, there is Jnana yoga, which is used and performed by individuals of wisdom/philosophically minded. Thirdly, the bhakti yoga is used to function as a type of worship or devotion to a god. The practices of yoga are used to connect with one’s atman thus, closer to moksha....   [tags: Religion]
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Islam and Buddhism - Islam and Buddhism Islam and Buddhism are two distinct religious traditions that provide their own meaningful responses to the fundamental questions about life. Their views on issues relating to the possibility of a Supreme Being, the purpose of life and their understanding of the cycle of life and death are all quite distinct from each other, but at the same time, having certain similarities. All Muslims profess the existence of the One and Only God, God Almighty who is also referred to as 'Allah'....   [tags: Papers] 389 words
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Theravadan Buddhism - Theravadan Buddhism Throughout history there have been numerous religions and theologies that men and women have entrusted their lives and ways of living to. One of the most intriguing is that of Buddhism. The great Buddha referred to his way as the middle way, and he, as the "Enlightened One" began the teachings of the religion with his first five Ascetics who he shows his middle way. This great occasion is the start to what will be known as Theravadan Buddhism. Although Theravadan Buddhism would later be seen as the "small vehicle," it provides the first idea of the doctrine anatman or having no-self that shapes the ideas of every Buddhist today....   [tags: essays research papers] 1151 words
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Zen Buddhism - Zen Buddhism No other figure in history has played a bigger part in opening the West to Buddhism than the eminent Zen author, D.T. Suzuki. One of the world's leading authorities on Zen Buddhism, Suzuki authored more than a hundred popular and scholarly works on the subject. A brilliant and intuitive scholar, Dr. Suzuki communicated his insights in a lucid and energetic fashion. Diasetz Teitaro Suzuki was born in Japan in 1870, received his philosophical training as a Buddhist disciple at the great Zen monastery at Kamakura, and was a distinguished professor of Buddhist philosophy at Otani University, in Kyoto, Japan....   [tags: Papers] 1183 words
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Zen Buddhism - ... This theory of doing to learn, rather than learning to do is presented by Hori when he discusses the responsibilities of incoming officers in Rinzai monasteries-- “...the incoming officer cannot apprentice himself to the outgoing officer to learn the ropes. The new officer must perform his duties without receiving prior instruction. If the new tenzo, or cook, makes a mistake...a senior monk will surely give him a tongue-lashing in front of everyone. The cook will be criticized if the rice is too hard, the soup is too salty, the vegetables have been cut too small, the tea is lukewarm, the faucet is left dripping” (Hori, 13-14)....   [tags: Religion] 1209 words
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Buddhism Speech - Today I am giving an informative speech on Buddhism. Now, "informative" is the key word here. I just want to reasure everyone that I am simply going to explain some of the philosophy of Buddhism. I am not, however, trying to sway your beliefs or views on life in ANY way. Instead, I'm going to share with you some of the basic things that I know, and however you choose to use the information, if at all, is totally up to you. In fact, one of the strongest beliefs of a Buddhist, is that their "way of life" is NEVER forced on anyone....   [tags: essays research papers] 834 words
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Buddhism and Ecology - If there was ever a culture that truly cared for the Earth, it was that of Buddhism. Buddhism itself is often known for commitment to World ecology. This is explored in the essay, Relational Holism, by David Landis Barnhill, in the book, Deep Ecology and World Religions. The subject of holism is brought to us many times and often acknowledgement of critical views is used to help convey the information. Beginning with a strong statement by Barnhill, “Critics of deep ecology have often attacked its holistic views of self and cosmology....   [tags: essays research papers] 316 words
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The Story of Buddhism - The Story of Buddhism The story of Buddhism might be said to have begun with a loss of innocence. Siddhartha Gautama, a young prince of the Shakhya clan in India, had been raised in a life of royal ease, shielded from the misery and cruelties of the world outside the palace gates, distracted by sensual pleasures and luxurious living. But one day the fateful encounter with the real world occurred, and Siddhartha was shaken to the core. There in his own kingdom, not far from his gardens and delights, he encountered people suffering from sickness, old age and death; he brooded over these things, deeply disturbed that such was the fate of all beings....   [tags: Papers] 2156 words
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Buddhism 101 - Buddhism is a well-known world religion, a religion that touch people heart with it great compassion together with the notion to spread the seed of wisdom to all sentient beings, to help them reach their enlightenment state, so that they can be liberate from the samsaric (suffering) world. However, to understand the teaching of Buddhism, we needed to know who is the founder, where is it originated, it teaching, and it history. Through these, we can be able to grasp the fundamental ideas or the basic teachings such as the Four Noble Truth and The Noble Eightfold Path....   [tags: Religion]
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Buddhism and Suicide - Buddhism and Suicide In his 1983 paper "The 'Suicide' Problem in the Paali Canon," Martin Wiltshire wrote: "The topic of suicide has been chosen not only for its intrinsic factual and historical interest but because it spotlights certain key issues in the field of Buddhist ethics and doctrine."[1] I think Wiltshire was right to identify suicide as an important issue in Buddhist ethics:[2] it raises basic questions about autonomy and the value of human life, and plays a pivotal role in related questions such as physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia....   [tags: essays research papers] 5996 words
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