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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Buddhism"
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The Dharma of Mahayana Buddhism - Advanced technology and luxurious items seem bring humans into a “Modern World.” However, it seems these 21st Century technologies and items have brought more dissatisfaction, the duhkha. Death, blood and war, these words appear in the newspaper almost everyday. Despite those external dissatisfactions, internally human kind becomes more selfish and lonely. As a matter of fact, a hypochondria is becoming so popular that one in seven adults is facing it. In our society today, Buddhism, especially Mahayana Buddhism, becomes a cure to the duhkha that we are facing today....   [tags: Buddhism] 1067 words
(3 pages)
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Buddhism Breaks Apart - Buddhism Breaks Apart Buddhism is the religion of spiritual enlightenment through the suppressing of one’s worldly desires. Buddhism takes one on the path of a spiritual journey, to become one with their soul. It teaches one how to comprehend life’s mysteries, and to cope with them. Founded in 525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama; Theravada Buddhism is the first branch of Buddhism; it was a flourishing religion in India before the invasions by the Huns and the Muslims, and Mahayana Buddhism formed due to new locations, it was altered according to local influences....   [tags: Buddhism]
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1388 words
(4 pages)
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Theravada Buddhism Versus Engaged Buddhism and Their Beliefs on Homosexuality - All religions have had to face changing social norms since their early stages, and Buddhism has been no exception to this challenge. Acceptance of homosexuality is just one of the many social issues that has emerged since Buddhism began that has rattled traditional ideas and views amongst its members. Homosexuality itself has been around since the beginning of human existence, but more recent occurrences like the gay rights movement that came about because of the sexual revolution of the 1960’s and the HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 1980’s have brought the issue to the forefront of the current human rights debate....   [tags: doctrine of elders, buddhism]
:: 9 Works Cited
897 words
(2.6 pages)
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Buddhism: Past and Present - Overtime many significant events have shaped history, from natural disasters, wars and the never ending feud of politics they have all played a significant role in history. But there is one that has had the most influential effect of all, religion. Throughout time there has been an abundance of different religions and practices formed over the years, from Christianity to Judaism, each of them having their own impacts on culture and society, one of the major religions that formed was Buddhism. Today we will discuss how Buddhism was founded, the practices of it, and how it has changed as it has entered a new area and interacted with a new people....   [tags: Buddhism Essay]
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660 words
(1.9 pages)
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Buddhism and Science - Buddhism places a high value on finding the truth. This fundamental principal allows for an acceptance of science, as it is seen as a modern truth to most. Furthermore, Buddhists believe in the evolution of human consciousness—this evolution, along with the truth presented from science, allows for an over arching acceptance of biological evolution. Even more interesting is that in the Agganna Sutta, a sacred Buddhist text, Buddha explains the world as having evolved over time. Though there is no mention of biological evolution, there is still an emphasis of evolution as a whole—both physically and spiritually....   [tags: Buddhism and Biological Evolution]
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1899 words
(5.4 pages)
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Tannisho: Master of Shin Buddhism - The Tannisho are the teachings of Shinran, Master of Shin Buddhism, which is a form of Shingon or Esoteric Buddhism. Shin Shingon Buddhism is also known as Pure Land Buddhism. This school of thought, therefore, comes out of the Mahayana tradition. It holds that the Dharma has become too corrupt to lead anyone on Earth to nirvana. Instead, there are “Buddha fields” (Gethin, 263) that one can be reborn into and obtain freedom from samsara through nirvana there. Through the Tannisho Shinran explains how one can call on the name of one of these Buddhas, and thus be saved from samsara by calling on the name of the compassionate Amida, Lord of the Western Paradise, Buddha of Immeasurable Light....   [tags: Amida, buddhism, shin shingon, mahayana]
:: 7 Works Cited
1187 words
(3.4 pages)
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Nhat Hanh and His Impact in Buddhism - “If you know how to maintain enlightenment and happiness, then your sorrow, your fear, your suffering don't have a lot of chance to manifest. If they don't manifest for a long time, then they become weaker and weaker. Then, when someone touches the seed of sorrow or fear or anger in you and those things manifest, you will know to bring back your mindful breathing and your mindful smiling. And then you can embrace your suffering.” (Nhat Hanh, 2) Rather than perceiving enlightenment as a big image, Nhat Hanh suggests that small moments of enlightenment have to succeed....   [tags: belief, enlightenment, Engaged Buddhism] 517 words
(1.5 pages)
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Mahayana Buddhism - History proves that as Buddhism spread throughout the Asian world in the early 1st century, it was occasionally altered to fit the specific needs and beliefs of people it touched. Mahayana Buddhism is one such example of this gradual evolution. It was primarily a movement started and kept alive by monks that slowly gained popularity amongst lay people but was in no way a unified movement. Mahayana Buddhism still adheres to the basic fundamental beliefs presented in the Pali Canons, however, it Sutras often expand upon these basic ideas and traditions in order to answer the questions of a later generation....   [tags: Mahayana Buddhism]
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1382 words
(3.9 pages)
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The spread and localization of Buddhism and Islam into Southeast Asia - The spread of religion first began through contact with neighbouring countries which gradually expand throughout the years. Buddhism and Islam are one of the most widespread religions across Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. Trade merchants and imperial support of the religion played as major factors which facilitated and localised the spread of Buddhism and Islam within various countries. However, there were limitations present which hindered the development of each religion in Southeast Asia as introduction of newer religions and changes within imperial power which would have affected their progression to become fully localise...   [tags: Religion, Buddhism, Islam] 677 words
(1.9 pages)
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Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism: Similar Views of Life - Buddhism According to Communication between cultures by Larry A.Samovar, Richard E. Porter and Edwin R.McDaniel, Buddhism was originated in Indian by the prince named Siddharth Guatama in about 563 B.C. Siddharth was born into a great luxury. He was married and by the age of 29 disillusioned with his opulence and ventured out of his palace. For the first time, the prince was encountered old age, sickness, and death. He was so moved with the painful realities of life that he left his wife and comfortable home to search for an end to human suffering....   [tags: religion, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, ]
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2658 words
(7.6 pages)
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Buddhism And The Four Principle Beliefs - BUDDHISM AND THE FOUR PRINCIPLE BELIEFS Buddhism, with about 365 million followers makes up 6% of the world's population and is the fourth largest religion in the world (exceeded by Christianity, Islam and Hinduism). Buddhism was founded in Northern India in the sixth century BCE by the first Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama when he attained enlightenment. Buddhism is made up three main forms. They are Theravada Buddhism found mainly in Thailand, Burma, Cambodia and Laos, Mahayana Buddhism which is largely found in China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia and Vajrayana Buddhism....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1545 words
(4.4 pages)
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A Life of Celibacy; Buddhism and Sex - A Life of Celibacy; Buddhism and Sex Buddhism which just may be the most tolerant religion in the world, constitutes teachings that can coexist with almost any other religions. Buddhism began with Siddhartha Gautama who lived in northern India in the sixth or fifth century B.C.E. The religion has guidelines in two forms in which Buddhist followers must follow. These are the Four Noble Truths and the Eight fold Path. Buddha taught that man is a slave to his ego and that the cause of suffering is desire, essentially the way to end suffering is to overcome desire....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1901 words
(5.4 pages)
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Theravada And Mahayana Buddhism - There are many interpretations of core teachings in most major religions. In Christianity, there was a major split over such teachings which resulted in Catholicism and Protestantism, and then within the Protestant church again which resulted in many differing views on foundational teachings. So it is with Buddhism. Buddha is born in 6th century B.C. as Siddhartha Gautama to a high caste of warriors, Kshatriya. It is said that as a child, he was inspected by a sage and found to be marked, indicating he would be an illustrious person (Experiencing World Religions, pg.121)....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1351 words
(3.9 pages)
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Animals In Buddhism - When my family first arrived in the dirty city of Bangkok, one of the first things my little sister asked me was “Why are there so many dogs everywhere?” Being the dog lover that she is, she was extremely disappointed to learn that these dogs were not only nobody’s pets, but that she also couldn’t pet them unless she wanted to get some weird fungus or sickness on the first couple days of her vacation. As I explained to them that the reason for all the dogs was because Thailand is mainly Buddhist and it is not in their fashion to kill these dogs, they still had a hard time accepting this fact seeing how miserable many of them look....   [tags: Animals Buddhism Karma] 1918 words
(5.5 pages)
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Buddhism and No-Self - Eastern enlightenment religions have been gaining popularity throughout the western world for the past few decades, with many people attracted to a "different" way of experiencing religion. As with many other enlightenment religions, Buddhism requires disciples to understand concepts that are not readily explainable: one such concept is that of no-self. In this essay I shall discuss the no-self from a number of modern perspectives; however, as no-self is difficult to describe I shall focus on both the self and no-self....   [tags: Religion Religious Buddhism] 1950 words
(5.6 pages)
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The American Encounter With Buddhism - Before reading "The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent" by Thomas A. Tweed I had no experience with Buddhism except for what I have seen in the movies and in the media. Seeing Buddhism through these different sources, it does not portray an accurate illustration of what the religion is truly regarding. Having little to no knowledge about the background of the religion makes reading this book both interesting and a little difficult to read at the same time....   [tags: Tweed Buddhism Religion] 1390 words
(4 pages)
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The Sacred Books In Hinduism And Buddhism - Sacred Books, in my opinion, are the most important things that can preserve the knowledge of religion. When transmitted orally certain interpretations may occur, especially when translated into different languages. India was a mother of many religions, particularly Hinduism and Buddhism. Hinduism “has no one identifiable founder, no strong organizational structure to defend it and spread its influence, nor any creed to define and stabilize its beliefs; and in a way that seems to defy reason, Hinduism unites the worship of many gods with a belief in a single divine reality.” (Molloy: 74) The Hindu scriptures are divided into two parts, the shrutis (what is heard) and the smritis (what is re...   [tags: Hinduism Buddhism Religion ] 1581 words
(4.5 pages)
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Buddhism - Every Moment We Live is an Opportunity (for understanding) - Every Moment We Live is an Opportunity (for understanding) Something that interests us all is ourselves - because we are the subject and main focus of our lives. No matter what you think of yourself, there is a natural interest because you have to live with yourself for a lifetime. The self view is therefore something that can give us a lot of misery if we see ourselves in the wrong way. Even under the best of circumstances, if we don't see ourselves in the right way we still end up creating suffering in our minds....   [tags: Buddhism] 862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Chinese Buddhist Miracle Stories - As the Han Empire fell into disarray, so did the Confucian ideological framework. The significance and importance of the supernatural and nether world heightened as scholars and intellectuals began to raise their interest towards the new explanations. This newly formed interest resulted in the creation of indigenous Chinese tales, often with unusual and extraordinary storylines. At the same time, this “new philosophical inquiry” sparked off Buddhism’s influence. As Buddhism spread throughout the country, many foreign Buddhist literatures were translated where most of these tales and stories were of didactic nature....   [tags: Buddhism] 1067 words
(3 pages)
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Comparing Buddhism and Christianity - Comparing Buddhism and Christianity In the early sixth century Christianity was evolving at a rapid pace. The spread of Christianity was not only moving westward through Europe, but it was also moving eastward down the Silk Road. The eastward spread of Christianity was primarily a form of Christianity known as Nestorianism, after the teachings of Nestorius, a fifth century patriarch. By 635 Nestorian Christianity had reached the heart of China spreading through all of Persia and India. During the middle of the seventh century Nestorian churches were found in cities all along the Silk Road, though there were unquestionably many fewer Christians than Buddhists in Asia Up until the turn...   [tags: Religion Buddhism Christianity Essays]
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1397 words
(4 pages)
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Ancient Chinese Civilization, East Asia, and Spread of Buddhism - Today I will be discussing china’s classical age to 256 B.C.E, East Asia and the spread of Buddhism from 256 B.C.E. to 800 C.E., and continue East Asia ‘s history to 1400. China’s classical age consists of its emerging civilization, the early Zhou dynasty, the warring states period, Confucius and the several different schools of thought. From the period of 256 B.C.E and 800 C.E. China was expanded and Buddhism began to spread rapidly. It was also during this period that China shaped much of eastern Asian culture....   [tags: buddhism, China, Zhou dynasty, Asian cultures] 1937 words
(5.5 pages)
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Christianity And Buddhism Compared - Buddhist and Christian Prayer: A Comparison in Practice and Purpose At first glance the traditions of Christianity and Buddhism appear very different from each other. One centers around a God that was at one time physically manifest on earth in the human form of his "son" Jesus Christ, the other primarily worships a historical figure that gained divine status through enlightenment. This assessment is broad at best, especially in the case of Buddhism where the Theravada and Mahayana traditions differ significantly....   [tags: Comparison Religion Christianity Buddhism] 1502 words
(4.3 pages)
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Comparison of Buddhism and Hinduism - Comparison of Buddhism and Hinduism “Thank goodness for eastern religion, I’m going to yoga class now and I redid my room to improve like my Zen, it really works…” for many in the western world, this is the most that is understood about eastern religions, particularly Buddhism and Hinduism. Although many would be interested to know that yoga is not just an exercise class; there are many more important details about Buddhism and Hinduism we are misinformed about, Especially, the differences of these two religions....   [tags: Buddhism Hinduism Compare Contrast Religion] 1007 words
(2.9 pages)
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Differences Between the Laity and Monastic Worshippers Within Buddhist Tradition - The differences between the laity and monastic worshippers within Buddhist tradition are distinguished by the extent to which these two groups are willing to follow the middle-way as taught by Buddha. Typically, in order to have a functional Buddhist society, there must be the devout, and those who support the devout, giving aid in the form of food, monies, shelter, transportation, etc. The devout who sacrifice the purity of a true monastic lifestyle in order to support the community (who in turn are the recipients of merit or punya; a bank of ‘good’ actions tied to ‘good’ karma) (Gethin 101), from the monastic worshippers, are called the laity; upasakas (men laity) and upasikas (women laity...   [tags: Buddhism]
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1759 words
(5 pages)
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Buddhism Vs Christianity - Religion is a fundamental element of human society. It is what binds a country, society or group of individuals together. However, in some instances it destroys unity amoungst these. Religion is a belief in a superhuman entity(s) which control(s) the universe. Every religion has its differences but most strive for a just life and the right morals. The three major groups are the primal regions which consist of African, Aboriginal and Native American religions, Asian which consist of South Eastern Asian religions and Abrahamic religions which consist of Middle Eastern religions....   [tags: Comparison Religion Buddhism Christianity] 1047 words
(3 pages)
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Buddhism - The Question is Buddhism Why. It can be a simple question to answer with something to the affect of, “just because”. To most of us however, this question at some point in our lives, or at this very moment, has plagued us and consumed countless hours of our deepest thoughts. Many have lost sleep over this grouping of 3 random letters from the English alphabet because it is the question that seems impossible to concretely answer. This has been the cause of the birth for numerous religions across the globe and throughout history....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1182 words
(3.4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Many people interpret Buddha as a big fat guy, that will give you luck if you rub his belly. This may be true, but Buddhism is much bigger than that. Buddhism began in Himalaya region and has been around since the first century. In Buddhism, the nature of God is a man named Shakyamuni Buddha. In this paper, we are going to look a little more into Buddhism. We will review responses from an actual Buddhism worshipper. We will also compare Buddhism to other religions. Although the Buddha was apparently an historical figure, what we know about him is sketchy....   [tags: Religion, Buddhism]
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1762 words
(5 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism, like most other religions, originated in a particular place at a particular time, and its roots are in forms and ideas that were part of the environment in which it developed. The most important of these areas at the time of the Buddha was the valley of the Ganges river which flows from west to east across most of northern India. It was here that the great religions of India first arose and flourished. Only later did they spread to the south. In the time of the Buddha, about 500 B.C.E., this area was undergoing a period of vigorous religious development....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1056 words
(3 pages)
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Buddhism - As a college student who has lived in Smallville, USA, I do not have much experience with the other religions of the world. I have grown up a Christian Protestant my whole life, and I am a firm believer in my religion. Soon after reading the chapter on Buddhism in Huston Smith’s book The World’s Religions, I came to understand and respect the Buddhist religion. I came to learn who the Buddha as a man really was, and the steps he took in becoming a religious icon. I know understand that Buddhism is not all meditation and relaxing....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1585 words
(4.5 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism What is Buddhism. Buddhism is a philosophy of life, it was started by Siddhartha Gotma , who is more commonly known as Buddha. Buddha isn’t god to them however he is well respected for passing down knowledge of how to find true happiness. The Buddhists major aim in life is to find enlightenment (true happiness).Buddhist monks live by a strict moral code, in which they are given food, they live a life structured around the teachings of Buddha. Who was Buddha. Siddhartha Gotama was born into a rich royal family, located in Nepal in 563 BC....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1527 words
(4.4 pages)
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Notions of Selflessness in Sartrean Existentialism and Theravadin Buddhism - Notions of Selflessness in Sartrean Existentialism and Theravadin Buddhism ABSTRACT: In this essay I examine the relationship between Sartre's phenomenological description of the "self" as expressed in his early work (especially Being and Nothingness) and elements to be found in some approaches to Buddhism. The vast enormity of this task will be obvious to anyone who is aware of the numerous schools and traditions through which the religion of Buddhism has manifested itself. In order to be brief, I have decided to select specific aspects of what is commonly called the Theravadin tradition as being representative of Buddhist philosophy....   [tags: Buddhism Sartre Essays]
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4179 words
(11.9 pages)
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A Shifting Image of Buddhism in America - When I visited the Phat Da Buddhist Congregation in San Diego, a Vietnamese Buddhist temple in San Diego, I was taken by surprise that the service was given in Vietnamese. The decorations on the wall, the sacred images displayed at the altar, and the vibrant color of the monk’s robe were still familiar, but what was being said was (very) foreign to me. I quickly became impatient and preoccupied with the question on why I was there in the first place. What would I write about for my final Buddhism assignment if I could not understand what was being said....   [tags: buddha, christianity, vietnamese buddhist]
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1204 words
(3.4 pages)
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Buddhist Steles - Buddhist steles are typically large, stone carvings meant to act as markers in prominent locations, such as temples, crossroads, or other Buddhist sites, in order to promote Buddhism. This stele in particular, entitled Shakyamuni and Prabhutaratna, is carved stone, standing 19.7” high. The work was created in China during the Eastern Wei period, sometime around 500 CE, and features indications of the late 5th-early 6th century such as the two seated buddhas and the dense robes worn by the buddhas....   [tags: Buddhism] 733 words
(2.1 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism Buddhism is the great oriental religion founded by Guatama Buddha, who lived and taught in India in the sixth century BC All Buddhists trace their faith to Buddha and "revere" his person (Frederic 15). Nearly all types of Buddhism include monastic orders whose members serve as teachers and clergy to the lay community (Maraldo 19). However, beyond these common features the numerous sects of modern Buddhism exhibit great variety in their beliefs and practices. In its oldest surviving form, known as Theravada or Hinayana....   [tags: Buddhism India Buddha Religion Essays]
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1175 words
(3.4 pages)
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Buddhism - Buddhism is probably the most tolerant religion in the world, as its teachings can coexist with any other religion's. However, this is not a characteristic of other religions. The Buddhist teaching of God is neither agnostic nor vague, but clear and logical. Buddhism was created by Siddhartha Gautama, who was born in the sixth century B.C. in what is now modern Nepal. Siddhartha grew up living the extravagant life of a young prince. His father was Suddhodana and was the ruler of the Sakya people....   [tags: Synopsis Research Paper Religion Buddhism] 910 words
(2.6 pages)
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How Does Buddhism Relate And Help To Formulate A Local Understanding Of Transsexuals In Thailand - How does Buddhism relate and help to formulate a local understanding of Transsexuals in Thailand. Thailand beholds the highest rate of Transsexuals throughout the world. According to Sam Winter, the numbers differ from about 10,000 to (unofficial) 300,000. Even if the number of 10,000 was "an accurate one, it would still represent an incidence substantially above that estimated for transgender in most other parts of the world" (6). To explain the case for this high number of transsexuals, I will refer to the impact of localization of Buddhism in Thailand and how it leads to the understanding of transsexuals in the current day....   [tags: Religion Buddhism Gender] 1873 words
(5.4 pages)
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Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism - There are two forms of Buddhism that are still prevalent in society today, these are Theravada and Mahayana. Both these traditions have existed for many centuries and encompass important beliefs derived from the Pali Canon and other ancient Indian Buddhist literature. They revert back to the orthodox teachings presented by the historical Gautama Buddha such as The Four Noble Truths and The Eightfold Path. Both these forms of Buddhism stay devoted to the traditional beliefs that the religion was built from and they accept the same basic understandings....   [tags: The Path To Enlightenment]
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2762 words
(7.9 pages)
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The Most Important Buddhist Sites - As a student that is just beginning to learn and discover all that encompasses Buddhism, it is easy to get wrapped up in the facts and to never truly feel connected to the religion. I believe that the best way to fully understand something is to experience it first hand. Throughout this semester, I have learned the values, history, teachings, and practices of Buddhism but I have been lacking the opportunity to see and experience any of these things first hand. While there are many important Buddhist sites scattered throughout India and Nepal, I would choose four as amongst the most significant to arrange a tour to for myself and for my fellow classmates....   [tags: Buddhism Essays]
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979 words
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Zen Buddhism In Japan - Art would not usually dare comment on life's ugliness that is all over the world when people are not ready to accept it; it is much more safe to comment on the beauty instead. In fact, being shattered by the loss of a child is not a subject usually addressed by this medium, but Bergman does confront the issue of postpartum depression in Persona. The inner struggles of two very different, yet strikingly similar women erupt in Persona. Elizabeth's withdrawal from society does not protect her from the pain she is feeling over her loss....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1673 words
(4.8 pages)
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Buddhism in Japan - “Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future; it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.” Albert Einstein (Buddhism) Buddhism has affected many people. From the Buddha’s first followers to my next door neighbor, people everywhere have followed the teachings of Buddhism....   [tags: Buddhist Research Paper 2015]
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3770 words
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The Accidental Buddhist - The Accidental Buddhist: Mindfulness, Enlightenment, and Sitting Still by Dinty M. Moore is a personal memoir about Moore’s journey into the world of American Buddhism. Although Moore is an Irish-American who lives in central Pennsylvania, was raised in a Catholic family, and attended Catholic school, he decided at a young age that God had let him down, he gave up religion. However, later on in his adult life he came across the book Being Peace by Thich Naht Hanh, and desired to know what the “Buddhists had discovered” and what he was “missing” (19)....   [tags: Dinty Moore, American Buddhist, buddhism]
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1617 words
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The Evolution of Buddhism - Buddhism is a unique religion that bestows upon its members that their actions accumulate karma and too much bad karma leads to rebirth. A person reaches Nirvana (also known as heaven) when achieving enlightenment and is no longer subjected to rebirth. Buddhism also believes there is no one almighty god, but rather many gods, which they refer to as deities. Dharma is commonly known as the sacred teachings of a deity. The Buddha is only born in certain situations that members are in need of re-teaching the Dharma....   [tags: Religion]
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1175 words
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The Origin and Mystery of the Aniconic Buddha - For most, it is difficult to describe Siddhārtha Gautama (the Historical Buddha) without imagining the round, jovial human form we have become accustomed to in popular culture. For five hundred years, however, Buddhism existed entirely without a human depiction of its leader; Instead, ancient Indian cultures produced various symbols to represent him in their artwork. The symbolic meaning of these images still remains a hotly debated subject between scholars, art historians, and archeologists. Nonetheless, these emblems should not be viewed as solely Buddhist, as they carried multiple meanings that accounted for Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike....   [tags: Buddhism ]
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1656 words
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The Story of Buddhism - Buddhism is a unique religion. Unlike most mainstream religions, Buddhists do not believe in any Gods, or souls. They instead believe in training the human mind to extinguish all negative desires, and thus become free of an eternity of suffering. The story of Buddhism started around 2500 years ago in India when Siddhartha Gautama was born into a royal family. His upbringing was the finest imaginable, being the son of a king. He was extremely well-educated and had all the qualities one would desire of a future king....   [tags: History, Four Noble Truths, Realms]
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1728 words
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The Universe in a Single Atom - The Dalai Lama the acclaimed spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism was forced into exile in 1959. He now resides in Dharamsala, India but considers himself to be a citizen of the world. The first of his pragmatic words to make an impression upon me was this statement. “If scientific analysis was to conclusively demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims”. The mere articulation of these words by an eminent religious world leader is enough to cause me to pause and listen with rapture to what this ecumenical gentleman has to disseminate....   [tags: Buddhism ] 897 words
(2.6 pages)
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Simple Traditions of a Buddhist - While studying the World religion textbook one of our chapters assigned was about Buddhism. I found the chapter very intriguing, since I am Christian that has not had much religion experiences outside of Christianity. The Buddhism chapter was very refreshing to read. I was captivated by the culture that I had to know more about it. That is why I decided to write about early Buddhism origins and practices in India. The word Buddhism represents “to awaken”. It emanates from two thousand five hundred years ago when the Buddha touched Nirvana....   [tags: buddhism, christian, religion]
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1509 words
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The Life of Buddhist Monks - The life of a Buddhist monk involves a considerable amount of patience. One must go through an immense amount of training which requires a great amount of time to accomplish to become a Buddhist monk. One must also become familiar with the background behind Buddhism to fully understand the life of Buddhist monks. The restrictions on their daily life also allow us to visualize the life of Buddhist monks. A person seeking insight on Buddhist monks’ lives should learn about meditation in Buddhism to increase background knowledge....   [tags: buddhism, noble truths, meditations]
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2048 words
(5.9 pages)
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Buddhism and Christianity - Systems of faith and religious practices have been a part of human society dating back 30,000 years ago during the Late Stone Age. Religion has been accepted as one of the cultural universals, which is a trait common to all human cultures worldwide throughout the history of humanity. While it is somewhat unclear exactly why the theory of religion has been formulated, it is clear that many societies have used a variety of religions as mediums to communicate and establish a general code of ethics to certain groups of people around the world....   [tags: religion, Tipitaka, afterlife, death, Holy Bible]
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1606 words
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Hinduism and Buddhism - Religion can be described as a centralized belief in which a group of people live their lives according to a set of practices, relating to the existence of a particular deity in order to fulfill a purpose. Religious studies are categorized so that each religion may be conveyed in an understandable way in which they are intended to. Many religions attribute, intentionally or not, to what is known as philosophical parallels. Attaining to these parallels involves a big problem with the way vocabulary is utilized....   [tags: Religion]
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1901 words
(5.4 pages)
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Morals of Buddhism - Buddhism consists of several morals throughout the religion that guide the way one should live. The overall goal of Buddhists is to become enlightened. “Enlightenment is one’s actions in this life that will determine the nature of future rebirths” (Hardy, 1). In order to become enlightened, Buddhists must follow morals and certain guidelines that were created by the Buddha. For example, the Four Noble Truths are guiding morals for followers in order to become enlightened. In particular, moral action is heavily displayed in the fourth truth, the Eightfold Path....   [tags: religion, enlightenment, karma, rebirth, Buddha]
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1383 words
(4 pages)
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The Power of Karma in Buddhist and Hindu Cultures - “Why are you acting like that. Don’t you want to go to heaven?” Chances are we have all heard something like this at some point in our lives because in Western society the dominant religion is Christianity. This religion brings the promise of heaven and eternal life to its greatest followers. However, this is not the case in the Eastern world particularly in India where Hinduism brings the promise of moksha to its followers and Buddhism brings the promise of nirvana to its followers. Since Buddhism originated during the time of Hinduism dominance there are some core similarities....   [tags: Buddhism, hinduism, karma, religion, ] 682 words
(1.9 pages)
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Buddhism: The 4 noble truths - Buddhism’s Four Noble Truths Siddharta Gautama was twenty-nine years old when he abandoned his family to search for a means to bring to an end his and other’s suffering after studying meditation for many years. At age thirty-five, Siddharta Gautama sat down under the shade of a fig tree to meditate and he determined to meditate until he reached enlightenment. After seven weeks he received the Great Enlightenment which he referred to as the Four Noble Truths and the Eight-fold Path. Henceforth he became known as the Buddha....   [tags: Buddhist Buddha essays research papers] 2086 words
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Buddhist Religion Experience: Personal Narrative - I was always fascinated in the Buddhist religion and this class assignment was a great opportunity for me to take advantage of my curiosity. I decided I would visit a Buddhist center. With the company of my mother, I went to the Diamond Way Buddhist Center in Miami. According to my interview with the Buddhist that instructed the meditation service, every Monday and Friday they have a meditation service for the 16th Karmapa meditation from 8:00pm to 8:30pm. This center is part of the Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism (Anonymous)....   [tags: Buddhism, Religion, Assignment]
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Buddhism and Meditation - Meditation is one of the practices that many religious and non-religious people use today. In Christianity, meditation is looked at in a form of prayer. When someone prays to God, they are meditating on their thoughts towards God. In Islam meditation is similar with Christianity. Meditation to them is reciting the Qur’an five times a day, which helps them to become closer to God. In Hinduism, they practice meditation by sitting down and reciting mantras, or in other forms is known as yoga. The Hindu meditation focuses more on physical needs and becoming closer in touch with the Brahman....   [tags: religion, christianity, God]
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Wat Buddharangsi Buddhist Temple - On Sunday, September 8, 2013, I visited the Wat Buddharangsi Buddhist temple of Miami in Homestead. Every Sunday, they present a meditation service in English for two hours from three to five in the afternoon. Once I parked, the place of ritual was conveniently located across the parking lot. There was a shoe rack outside of the temple. Before I came to this temple, I read the guidelines from their website. The requirements for new guests are to remove your shoes before entering inside. Therefore, when I saw the shoe rack, I was not in shock....   [tags: buddhism, Buddha, religion]
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The Path of a Buddhist - The Path of a Buddhist Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama. Today, Buddhism has an estimated seven hundred million followers, known as Buddhists. Most practicing Buddhists believe in ideas such as karma, dharma, samsara and nirvana. In addition to these, Buddhists base their lives and actions on the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. Taught by Gautama, the Noble Eightfold path is a theory, that when put into action, serves as a way to end suffering (The Noble Eightfold Path)....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1292 words
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The Effects of Buddhist Teachings - In this paper I will explore the effects of Buddhist teaching used by these two organizations: The Cambodian Buddhism Association for Vulnerable Children and the ACT Alliance. Using these two foundations I will focus on the work of Buddhist monks, nuns and lay people on how they use a Buddhist approach to tackle poverty and hunger in their designated areas. Buddhist monks believe they can influence development in a positive way and actually have a way responsibility to do so from a Buddhist perspective; it is the monks’ duty to instruct the lay-population in Buddhist teachings and ethics, to give moral support and become engaged in activities that reduce dukkha (suffering)....   [tags: Cambodian Buddhism Association for Vulnerable Chil]
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Buddhism and the Collapse of the Tang Dynasty - Religion has always had an impact on an individual’s perspectives and the government, and this can clearly be seen with Buddhism and the Tang Dynasty. Before Buddhism pervaded China, the traditional religion in China was Confucianism, and the majority of individuals strictly followed the rules and principles of Confucianism. When Buddhism was introduced, every person engendered their own views on Buddhism and the influences the religion would have on the government. The Tang Dynasty generated a prosperous time in China, until the dynasty spiraled down into its demise in c....   [tags: Chinese History, Han Yu, Morals and Values] 2246 words
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Relationship of Buddhism with the Tang Government - Relationship of Buddhism with the Tang Government Since the introduction of Buddhism into China, it was not well received by the population as its foreign beliefs clashed with pre-existent principals of Confucianism and Taoism. On top of that, it was alienated by the Confucianism-based government in the late Han Dynasty. All in all, Buddhism was not a common nor a popular religion throughout China at first. Nevertheless, this all changed after the rise of the Tang Dynasty. There is no doubt that Buddhism and the Tang administration under Wu’s reign formed a critical symbiotic relationship with one another....   [tags: China] 1239 words
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Relationship of Buddhism with the Tang Government - Since the introduction of Buddhism into China, it was not well received by the population as its foreign beliefs clashed with pre-existent principles of Confucianism and Taoism. On top of that, it was alienated by the Confucianism-based government in the late Han Dynasty. All in all, Buddhism was not a common nor a popular religion throughout China at first. Nevertheless, this all changed after the rise of the Tang Dynasty. There is no doubt that Buddhism and the Tang administration under Wu’s reign formed a critical symbiotic relationship with one another....   [tags: Chinese History, Church&State, Empress Wu] 1910 words
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Seven Dimensions of Religion in Buddhism - Buddhism can be indirectly defined by using Ninian Smart’s Seven Dimensions of Religion. Ninian Smart pioneered the idea of secular religious study (Ninian Smart). In 1968, he tried to define religion by defining the shared “dimensions,” or properties, rather than creating a dictionary definition of the word. Initially, there was six dimensions, but in 1998, he updated the list to seven (Smart, Blackboard, Religion 100). The first dimension is ritual and practical, which are the practices directly involving a religion, such as prayer and weekly worship services....   [tags: rituals, doctrine, emotionals dimension, religion]
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Differences Between Buddhism and Christianity - People who come from different areas may have same cultures and language while people who come from different countries may eat different food. However, people who live in the different places may have different religions. Two different religions that have a certain differences are the Buddhism and Christianity such as lifestyle, beliefs, and vies on universe. Although the Buddhism and Christianity could share similarities in some ways, the differences between them are more significant. As we can know, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islamism are the three largest religions all over the world....   [tags: Concept of Sin, Doctrine]
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The Seperation of Hinduism and Buddhism - The origins of Hinduism can be traced back to the Vedic traditions of the Indus Valley Civilization (Mittal and Thursby 23) where as Buddhism can be seen as originating from Hinduism, and yet they are seen as two completely different religions. Why. These religions do share some of the same practices, however there are also vast differences. The caste system is a major social institution of Hinduism, but Buddhism rejects the caste system. Buddhism opposes the idea of a soul, while Hinduism perceives the soul as being one with Brahman....   [tags: Caste System, Soul]
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The Contribution of the Kushan Empire to Buddhism - The material world constantly changes according to the natural law of impermanent. History had shown that while one civilization perished, another develops. However, for some disappeared civilization, vast information remained intact, while other buried in ruins or even no trace is left behind. It is essential to note that without past there would not be possible for current and future. Therefore, history is very important. According to David Hume: History is not only a valuable part of knowledge, but opens the door to many other parts, and affords materials to most of the sciences....   [tags: Kushan Empire]
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Masters and Gautama: A Synthesis of Buddhist Philosophy - Masters and Gautama: A Synthesis of Buddhist Philosophy Regardless of who we are or where we come from, we are unlucky enough to be subject to a world consisting of modifiers, pre-established social elements, systems of opinion and belief, which, though we may be unaware of them while they work their magic on us, ultimately serve to wrap us in a prison of thought. At the same time, there exist modifiers which may serve to free us. Depending on the right conditions, the time, we can be fortunate enough to see through the shroud pulled over our head at birth, to the true explanation of why we’re here, the truth of our existence....   [tags: Buddhism Buddhist Philosophy Papers]
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Similarities Between Buddhism and Christianity - In present-day society, the globalization, briefly including economics, and culture, has become an unstoppable tendency. With its rapid development and cultural communication, some controversies have emerged. Religious conflicts are characteristic examples showing the detrimental influences of cultural globalization. It is generally acknowledged that Buddhism and Christianity are ancient and global religions; however, whether the belief in Buddhism is credible or not, has sparked spirited debate....   [tags: Religion] 823 words
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Spread of Buddhism in China - It is believed that Buddhism spread to China through the Silk Road. When the Silk Road opened in the 2nd century BC, missionaries and pilgrims spread Buddhism to China. Chang Ch’ien was recorded to first bring Buddhism to China when he heard about India and Buddhist beliefs on his way back to China. In about the 1st century BC, a Buddhist community is said to have been living in China. But the most well-known story of the spreading of Buddhism is when Han emperor, Mingdi, had a dream about Buddha in 68 CE and sent Cai Yin, his official to learn more about it....   [tags: Chinese History] 771 words
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Theravada Buddhism and Escaping Rebirth - Many of the mainline religions have the ultimate goal of receiving enlightenment. Most of which, enlightenment comes in the form of eternal afterlife in a superior setting with the higher power. Buddhism however, reaches enlightenment or also known as Nirvana by escaping the cycle of rebirth. Buddhism has been around as a religion for quite some time now an in today’s society it may seem too be viewed a bit different but still the main principles it was founded on still stand. Buddhism gets more in detail and specific if it is being observed to that extent, into three branches also known as "vehicles"....   [tags: Religion]
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The Significance of Self-Immolation in Buddhism - In the scope of Buddhism, and in religion in general, rituals are very important. When defining faith, the easiest ways to do so are to look at scriptures, material objects, and rituals. In Buddhism there is a wide variety of rituals practiced by a large group of people; however, I found interest in the lesser known, less popular rituals. One such ritual which grabbed my attention was self-immolation, specifically auto-cremation. Especially with the protests in Vietnam against the government led by Ngo Dinh Diem that oppressed the Buddhists there, auto-cremation is an important Buddhist tradition that people underestimate the historical and religious importance of....   [tags: Self-Immolation]
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Nietzsche’s Meditation on Buddhism - Many of us have been taught at a really early age what religion we are to follow and, what God is our God. We don’t have a say or don’t even think we have a say. At a certain age you stumble on a person that changes your prospective on life and makes you question everything. Nietzsche was that person that yanked my comfortable welcome carpet off my feet. Religion and all that came with it was nothing but an afterthought. When again I stumbled on an amazing person that I see in every Asian restaurant we come across by....   [tags: religion, Buddha, Zarathustra]
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Buddhism and the Four Noble Truths - Tilopa once said, “It is not the outer objects that entangle us. It is the inner clinging that entangles us.” Over 2500 years ago, Buddha outlined the framework for Buddhist thought in which he declared that he taught suffering, its origin, cessation and path. The four noble truths contain the basis of Buddha’s ideas which he attained while meditating under a bodhi tree, which would later become a Buddhist symbol. While Buddhism is not practiced by many, its affect in the world can be seen in the utilization of the four noble truths that Buddha was enlightened with....   [tags: Siddhartha Guatama, tilopa]
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History of Korean Buddhism - Buddhism had its beginnings in one of the world’s earliest civilizations, the Indus valley culture known as the Harappan. This area would later become India. Outsiders known as the Indo Aryans, who had migrated from the Russian steppes, would later assimilate the indigenous peoples there. (Reat, 1994:3) These nomadic pastoralists brought with them sacred texts known as the Vedas. Each Veda contained a section called the Upanishad. While the rest of the Vedas contained poems and hymns or practical instructions for rituals and sacrifices, the Upanishads focused more on meditation....   [tags: induism, harappan, cultural revolution]
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Buddhism and Western Psychology -   Western Psychology and Buddhism Western psychology is concerned with the investigation of understanding the negative aspects of human behavior, emotions and the mind, and to some extent, with changing them. The Buddhist approach to the investigation of the mind is unscientific, as defined by the science of Western Psychology. It is not concerned with laboratory conditions, control groups, or ‘objectivity’ in the sense of the experimenter being separate from and impartial to the subject (Nettle, 2005)....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Asceticism in Buddhism and Hinduism - Asceticism in Buddhism and Hinduism Asceticism is derived from the Greek word “askesis”, meaning practice, bodily exercise, and athletic training (Cambell). Early Christians adopted this concept to foretell of the spiritual things in order to acquire habits of virtue. Virtue is the behavior showing high moral standards. There also is natural asceticism in meaning it is for self-improvement and aims directly to natural virtues such as temperance, patience, and chastity. The following will explain what asceticism is, why asceticism is practiced, and the nature of asceticism practices in Hindu and Buddhist traditions....   [tags: Self Improvement, Temperance, Patience, Chastity]
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Buddhism, Jainism and Hinudism - Jainism, in many respect, is the most prominent religion in India, it is also associated with other major religions e.g. Hinduism and Buddhism. In the past, it was considered that Jainism was a stem either of Buddhism or of Hinduism. However, nowadays it is a well-known reality that Jainism is a separate religion of India but not a branch of either Buddhism or Hinduism. It is accepted that Jainism is the primordial religion of India. As Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism, are the most prominent religions of India, and have existed side by side for many centuries, it is accepted that they have impacted one another in several ways....   [tags: world religions, comparative religios]
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Mahayana Branch of Buddhism - One branch of Buddhism is Mahayana, which literally means the Great Vehicle. Mahayana can more easily be defined as a loose collection of teachings with large and extensive principles that coexist all together. Mahayana defines itself as penetrating further and more deeply into the Buddha's Dharma, or the way of the Buddha. This practice originates in India, and slowly spread across Asia to countries as China, Japan, Korea through the missionary activities of monks and the support of kings. However, the roots of this religion are still not completely known....   [tags: Religious Texts, Dharma] 1123 words
(3.2 pages)
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Buddhism: The Hinayana Sect - Centuries after the death of Buddha, followers of his teachings multiplied as his influential ideas spread throughout the region. But discontent amongst the followers began to accumulate as Buddha’s vague teachings were constantly interpreted and re-interpreted, leading to many discrepancies. These discrepancies lead to different ideologies and the division of the religious order into various sects. The two main sects became the known as the Mahayana school and the Hinayana school but despite the artificial differences resulting from the division of the Mahayana sect from the earlier Buddhist teachings (Hinayana), the essence of their beliefs is two of the same....   [tags: Mahayana, duddha] 1087 words
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Buddhism in Fight Club - “Whenever we find one who has come unscathed through every test in childhood, youth, and manhood, we shall set him as a Ruler to watch over the commonwealth; he will be honoured in life, and after death receive the highest tribute of funeral rites and other memorials.” Great philosophers like Plato and Machiavelli raised a lot of arguments in how a true guardian is like. Although there have been some oppositions on how guardians should execute duties, it is noticeable that both philosophers agree that a true guardian is more than just a leader....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Korean Buddhism - The most fascinating aspect in Korean history prior to the 1500’s is the introduction and influence of Buddhism. Although Buddhism was introduced into the Korean society in early years, it was not accepted until many years later. After acceptance, Korean Buddhism began to grow, develop and spread throughout the country. With Buddhism, came many distinctive aspects. These very distinctive Buddhist characteristics have influenced Korean culture throughout the different time periods in many ways such as art, architecture, spiritual civilization, and Korean society as a whole....   [tags: monks, philosophy, culture] 833 words
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Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism - Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism constitute the essence of the traditional Chinese culture. The relationship among the three has been marked by both competition and complementation in history, with Confucianism playing a more dominant role. Confucianism emphasized a reiteration of current moral values and Taoism developed a system of based upon a harmonization of man with the natural order. These two popular philosophies, however, developed into popular religions eventually. Besides the major religions, ancestor worship and animism also have strong support in China....   [tags: Chinese Culture, Politics, Social Life] 1035 words
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