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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Brave New World"
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No Control of Happiness in Brave New World - Brave New World, acknowledges government control which results in the failure of a society. It is a world created where everything is under control, being observed, and synthetic. The society was manufactured in a test tube therefore, it was factory made. The people were born and developed in the test tubes, so their human nature became adapted so an individual cannot identify or approach it. Every little detail of a person's life is prearranged. These people's lives revolve around their community, their existence, and security; never their individual happiness....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1594 words
(4.6 pages)
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A Brave New World - In this world where people can acquire anything they need or want, we have to wonder, “Is the government controlling us?” Both the governments in A Brave New World and in the United States of America offer birth control pills and have abortion clinics that are available for everyone, thus making birth control pills and abortion operations very easy to acquire. Although both governments offer birth control pills and abortion clinics, A Brave New World’s government requires everyone to take the pills and immediately get an abortion when pregnant....   [tags: A Brave New World, Govenrment Control]
:: 5 Works Cited
1161 words
(3.3 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World introduces us to a futuristic technological world where monogamy is shunned, science is used in order to maintain stability, and society is divided by 5 castes consisting of alphas(highest), betas, gammas, deltas, and epsilons(lowest). In the Brave New World, the author demonstrates how society mandates people’s beliefs using many characters throughout the novel. John, a savage, has never been able to fit in society. Moving through two contradicting societies, John is unable to adapt to the major differences of the civilized society due to the different ways upon how it is conducted....   [tags: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World] 939 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Delusion of Happiness in Brave New World and Canada - Abraham Lincoln once said, “Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.” Thus, implying happiness can be determined by ones mindset. However, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World creates a vision of a utopian society that achieves happiness by altering the mindset of its populace to believe they are happy. In a society depicting such a strange ideology of the future, people are no longer as happy as they make their minds up to be, but as happy as the government allows them to be....   [tags: brave new world, huxley]
:: 7 Works Cited
1344 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Death of John Savage in Brave New World - A “utopia is that which is in contradiction with reality,” said the famous French novelist Albert Camus in his collection of essays, Between Hell and Reason. History shows us that seemingly exemplary ideals in practice have led to the collapse of societies. Just examine the two most prominent attempts at a utopia: Hitler’s attempt to socialize all of Europe and create the “perfect” Aryan race coupled with Karl Marx’s beliefs to instate communism into society. The final result was the destruction of their perspective visionary worlds....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
2206 words
(6.3 pages)
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Use of Propaganda in the 1930’s and in Brave New World - Life in the 1930’s for Americans was very bewildering since the country was just coming out of the Red Scare. Aldous Huxley published a dystopian book, Brave New World, in which the fictional “controllers” in the novel could easily manipulate the ignorance of people through drugs and conditioning. The government used the drug soma as a way to make everyone high and agree to anything that the hierarchy wanted. Taking soma makes everyone crave it even more because it is an addictive drug....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 13 Works Cited
1141 words
(3.3 pages)
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Satire in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Aldous Huxley. The very name summons psychedelic visions and utopian nightmares to the western psyche. He was born on the 26th of July in 1894, and died on the 22nd of November 1963. He saw the turn of the century, two world wars, the decline of the British lion, the ascendance of the American eagle and the Cuban missile crisis. In short, he lived through some of the most unstable times man has seen as a species. His work was varied. He began his career as a satirist of the class system he endured in England....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1235 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Role of Technology in Huxley's Brave New World - Technology, which has brought mankind from the Stone Age to the 21st century, can also ruin the life of peoples. In the novel Brave New World, the author Aldous Huxley shows us what technology can do if we exercise it too much. From the novel we can see that humans can lose humanity if we rely on technology too much. In the novel, the author sets the world in the future where everything is being controlled by technology. This world seems to be a very perfectly working utopian society that does not have any disease, war, problems, crisis but it is also a sad society with no feelings, emotions or human characteristics....   [tags: Brave New World] 1093 words
(3.1 pages)
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Use of an Outsider’s Perspective in Brave New World - Aldous Huxley uses the viewpoint of an outsider, or Savage, to give the reader different perspectives of his dystopian world in Brave New World. After traveling to the World State from the reservation, John (the savage) disagrees with the lack of intimacy, the lack of morality, and the lack of free will that he witnesses there, which shows the reader a very different side of the World State. These imperfections, along with many other factors, cause John to plunge into insanity and eventually commit suicide....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1543 words
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A Brave New World: Was Aldous Huxley Correct? - A Brave New World, written by Aldous Huxley, is a book that to me is more of a warning then entertainment. In the book, Huxley writes about a future civilization and all how everything in life is simplified. Babies are created in factories and are designed however scientists want them to be. Relationships are completely irrelevant and frowned upon in this world. People are distracted from true beauty and left to submit their selves into a false world. Since this book was written in 1931, Huxley obviously had no knowledge of new age technology....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
1442 words
(4.1 pages)
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Analysis of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - In our world, there is a plethora of societies. Different societies have different approaches to freedom, and have different ideas of what freedom is. In our society, we are taught that freedom is something that everybody should have no matter who they are or where they are from. In A Brave New World, Huxley gives us two examples of societies. These societies are the World State and the Reservation and they both have very different types of and views on freedom. By using these two examples and providing the readers with multiple characters that live in each society, Huxley clearly shows us his view on the subject of freedom....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1445 words
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New Meaning in a Brave New World - New Meaning in a Brave New World The motto of the "Brave New World" was "Community, Identity, and Stability." In the following essay the actual meanings of these terms will be addressed. The term "Community" really did not have the meaning that we are accustomed to hearing and speaking in the modern day and age (1996). Instead it stands for almost a lack of "Community", meaning that there is no choice of where one ranks in the "Community", instead you are assigned even before production (natural birth is non-existent) your place in society and a person could never know what are the differences between being an Alpha or a Gamma....   [tags: Brave New World] 903 words
(2.6 pages)
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A Reflection on Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Literature is both shaped by our culture and shapes it. Because of this it is an effective representation of the culture of a time. One can tell how people were affected by the events of the times by how it comes through in their writing. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is a prime example of this. The work was targeted at people in a post WWI world. This is a time between WWI and WWII where the world is still shocked by how rapidly the science of war had advanced. People also continue to be appalled with the mass death of a World War caused by such technology and therefore yearn for a more stable world....   [tags: Brave New World Literary Analysis ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1607 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Downside of Technology Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Brave New World illustrates a utopian societie; however, the utopia Brave New World attempts to create is primarily governed by technological progress. The novel shows that an obsession with technological progress creates a dystopic society. Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World illustrates a utopian society; however, the utopia that Brave New World attempts to create is predominantly governed by technological progress. Throughout the novel, Aldous Huxley shows that an obsession with technological progress creates a flawed and dystopic society....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
531 words
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Suppression of Individuality in Huxley's Brave New World and Rand's Anthem - Fahrenheit 451, a Ray Bradbury book, possesses a stereotypical citizen named Guy Montag. Guy sees the world just the same as any other individual. No true happiness or emotion is ever evoked. In his society, Montag becomes aware that books and other censored items exist in the world, but their presence has no impact on him until a female character enters the story. Talking one afternoon, Montag becomes interest in this female’s opinions on society. He soon concludes that the government is repressing individuality by censoring numerous avenues of entertainment that allow people to form their own thoughts and judgments; done so to maintain social stability....   [tags: brave new world, anthem] 1682 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Critical Response to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - After writing an incredible novel that to some was quite controversial due to its antigovernment subject, Aldous Huxley became one of the greatest writers of his time with his novel Brave New World. Huxley’s background had a significant influence on his writings and to the subject of his marvelous novel. The period in which Brave New World was written, along with the historical and cultural conditions of the time, also had an immense affect on the work. As an illustrious writer with such a controversial novel, many had their own critical responses to this piece of literature....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 11 Works Cited
1706 words
(4.9 pages)
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Technology's Control Over Society Illustrated in Aldus Huxley's Brave New World - Technology is defined as using the entire body of science, methods, and materials to achieve an end. In the novel, technology is used to control the life of everyday people to develop new ones. The author Aldus Huxley set the world in the future where everything is being controlled by technology. Even the new born are controlled way before they were born. This is a scary society because everything is being controlled even before someone is born, in a test tube, where they get to be determine of what class they are going to belong, how they are going to look like and beyond....   [tags: Brave New World] 680 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Role of Government and Technology in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Merriam Webster’s definition of satire is a type of literary work used to ridicule human vices and follies. This type of work is presented in Aldous Huxley’s, Brave New World, when criticizing the power and control of the World State through the use of advanced technology towards the members of the World State. Throughout the novel the World State is portrayed as a totalitarian government controlling every aspect of its citizens lives. This controlling is made possible through all the advanced technology available within the World State....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 648 words
(1.9 pages)
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Comparing the Dystopian Society in Brave New World and Modern Society - The meaning of happiness is a vague concept. Mankind has always tried to achieve this state of well-being even though there isn’t a clear definition. Brave New World tells the story of a society where there is nothing but happiness, just like a utopia, but it is considered a dystopian setting by the modern society. In modern society, there is a simple road that most people follow to achieve happiness: earning enough money for education, getting a university degree, a prestigious and high-paying job, and a stable marriage....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1458 words
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A Brave New World is Pending - A Brave New World is Pending In the March 6 issue of Science News, J. Raloff wrote "If pregnancies early in adulthood reduce a woman's lifelong risk of developing breast cancer, could short-term hormonal treatments that simulate aspects of pregnancy do the same thing. A new study suggest that the answer is yes." Reading that fast-forwarded my imagination to a horrible future, one described in Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World," where women of the future undergo surrogate pregnancies....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 1335 words
(3.8 pages)
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Isolation in Brave New World - Isolation in Brave New World   "If one's different, one's bound to be lonely."  -John "The Savage" In the Brave New World, people who are different from the normal standard are alienated and isolated from society because of their individuality. The society of the Brave New World is structured and ordered – the government attempts to control everything. Alienation in the Brave New World can be categorized into three areas, appearance, intellect, and morals.               Bernard Marx was alienated in the Brave New World because of his general appearance....   [tags: Brave New World] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Distortion in Brave New World - Distortion in Brave New World Distortion is an image of a thought or idea that appears to have a single affect on a society, but in actuality provides one that is totally different. Often times in order for readers to understand the realism of today's society and the point that the author tries to make in presenting its flaws, the writer must distort reality. In doing this he urges the reader to engage in a deep thought process that forces them to realize the reality of a situation, rather than perceiving it to be good or evil based on the dilutions of individuals....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 707 words
(2 pages)
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Imagine a Brave New World - Imagine a Brave New World         Imagine living in a world without mothers and fathers, a place in which all those around you are human clones with no personality, a vast array of people that are not seen as individuals but a social body. This society results from the absence of spirituality and family, the obsession with physical pleasure, and the misuse of technology. The society described above, becomes a reality in A Brave New World, a novel depicting how the advancement of science effects humanity....   [tags: Brave New World] 1241 words
(3.5 pages)
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1984 and Brave New World - 1984 and Brave New World Undoubtedly, the thought of living in, or forming a utopian society has flashed through nearly every person’s mind. A few people have even tried to make this ideal dream society a reality. Unfortunately, within the pursuit of these societies the leaders become corrupt and begin to become paranoid with the fear of rebellion. Hundreds of people were murdered during the reigns of Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin in what they considered measures to maintain peace and stability within their respective “perfect” society....   [tags: 1984 Brave New World] 1312 words
(3.7 pages)
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Civilization in Brave New World - Civilization in Brave New World        The dictionary defines civilized as "advanced in social customs, art, and science".  The keyword here is social customs.  A persons idea of what is civilized is relative to his culture.  Through out the history of man, one can see many changes in customs, and customs is what defines our idea of what is civilized.  The word civilized is one of the most relative concepts.        Time and distance are what have shaped our customs for thousands of years.  If we look back throughout history we can see many customs that may seem odd, or even barbaric, to us but were everyday events to these ancient people.  For example, the Aztec conducted sacrific...   [tags: Brave New World] 641 words
(1.8 pages)
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Conformity in Brave New World - Conformity in Brave New World    The novel, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley first published in 1932, presents a very bleak out look of what future society will be like. The novel presents a future of where almost total conformity is a carefully guarded aspect of society. Even before one is "decanted" they are conditioned to fill a specific roll and to act a certain way.   Everyone, while still in their jar, is conditioned to fit into a specific caste. The castes range from Alpha Double Plus down to Epsilon Semi-Moron....   [tags: Brave New World] 1131 words
(3.2 pages)
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Happiness in Brave New World - Happiness in Brave New World Huxley implies that by abolishing nastiness and mental pain, the brave new worlders have got rid of the most profound and sublime experiences that life can offer as well. Most notably, they have sacrificed a mysterious deeper happiness which is implied, but not stated, to be pharmacologically inaccessible to the utopians. The metaphysical basis of this presumption is obscure. There are hints, too, that some of the utopians may feel an ill-defined sense of dissatisfaction, an intermittent sense that their lives are meaningless....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 1227 words
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Brave New World and Gattaca - Brave New World and Gattaca Huxley  Living in a genetically perfect world is not necessarily a great achievement to mankind.  It makes one think, "where do you draw the line in the advancement of eugenics?"  Both worlds, the Brave New one and Gattaca, are alternative futures (clearly dystopic), written and shown in a believable way (not as much in BNW, though) through the use of satire.  Also, for GATTACA, the director incorporates the traditional elements of movie - a murder-mystery tied in with a love story PLUS a science fiction touch - very effectively.  Satire in Huxley's novel is glaringly obvious (mockery of the education system and the morals of today along wi...   [tags: Brave New World] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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Brave New World - Technology - Brave New World - Technology Technology, what is it. It’s usually something new, and better than the old idea. Technology started with cars, stoves, TV, radios, etc. Cars takes somebody from one place to another, faster than walking, running, or biking and one could go places without getting tired. Stoves allowed one to conveniently be able to turn on and off heat to a cooking utensil with less clean up. The biggest contributor to making our lives easier would be computers, which has come a long way since its introduction to the world....   [tags: Brave New World] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Brave New World: Helplessness - Brave New World: Helplessness How can one distinguish happiness from unhappiness if unhappiness is never experienced. It's the bad that makes the good look good, but if you don't know the good from the bad, you'll settle for what you're given. Can people judge their feelings without a basis or underlying "rubric" to follow. Such rudimentary guidelines are established through the maturation process and continue to fluctuate as one grows wiser with a vaster array of experiences. Aldous Huxley creates a utopia filled with happiness, but this is merely a facade to a world which is incomplete and quite empty since the essential "experiences" are replaced with "conditioning." Perhaps th...   [tags: Brave New World] 1084 words
(3.1 pages)
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Quest for Truth Depicted in Swift's Gulliver's Travels and Huxley's Brave New World - The search for the truth may take a lifetime, while for others it may take a year. It all depends on the person and how eager he acts to seek out the truth. The truth within every human being describes an individual’s thoughts that we hold sacred, that make us unique. The following expression “the truth will set you free”, has swept across the nation, through movies and other types of media entertainment. With the knowledge of truth comes great power which houses both good and evil thoughts. If used for evil, it can imprison a person, while for good it can release a man from prison....   [tags: Gulliver's Travels, Brave New World]
:: 4 Works Cited
1153 words
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King Lear and a Brave New World: Similar Themes and Motifs - In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New world and William Shakespeare's King Lear, the reader will find that both works use similar motifs that mirror each other to increase further the similarities and significance of the works. The Brave new world tries to destroy any of human emotion, which is why Huxley has chooses Shakespeare as the basis of John's system of beliefs involved in personal connection. Although the story lines in both of the publications are quite different from one another, there is no doubt that there are themes that allow one to create a comparison between the two books....   [tags: King Lear, Brave New World, ] 786 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Application of Utopia in Brave New World - The Application of Utopia in Brave New World      Aldous Huxley's Brave New World illustrates the loss of morality when established standards are replaced by amoral criteria.  In his novel, Huxley criticizes the practical applications of Utopia in actual society. Huxley's depiction of love, science, and religion support the ineffectiveness of implementing Utopia in everyday life.         In Brave New World, Huxley shows contempt for the human emotion of love.  The people that make up his imaginary society have no conception of love or any other passion, and actually scorn the idea.  Huxley believes that along with passion comes emotional instability.  The Utopian state...   [tags: Brave New World]
:: 3 Works Cited
1192 words
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The Price of Perfection in Brave New World - The Price of Perfection in Brave New World Aldous Huxley's Brave New World presents a portrait of a society which is superficially a perfect world. At first inspection, it seems perfect in many ways: it is carefree, problem free and depression free. All aspects of the population are controlled: number, social class, and intellectual ability are all carefully regulated. Even history is controlled and rewritten to meet the needs of the party. Stability must be maintained at all costs....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 640 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Death of Creativity in Brave New World - The Death of Creativity in Brave New World Aldous Huxley, in his distopian novel,Brave New World, presents a horrifying view of a possible future in which society has become a prisoner of the very technology it hoped would save us. In Brave New World Huxley's distortion of technology, religion, and family values, is much more effective than his use of literary realism found in his depiction of a savage reservation. Through his use of distortion Huxley tells a classic tale with the theme of, be careful what you wish for, because it may not truly be what you wanted....   [tags: Brave New World] 740 words
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The Significance of John in Brave New World - The Significance of John in Brave New World In Brave New World, there are three societies: the civilized society of Bernard and Mustapha Mond, the savage society of John and Linda, and the old society, which is not explicitly in the book but is described by the characters. These societies are vastly different. The old society is 20th century Western society; the civilized society creates people and conditions them for happiness and stability; and the savage society is very far behind the civilized society technologically, and is very religious....   [tags: Brave New World] 791 words
(2.3 pages)
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A Dystopian Future in Brave New World - Brave New World is a remarkable journey into the future wherein mankind is dehumanized by the progress and misuse of technology to the point where society is a laboratory produced race of beings who are clones devoid of identity only able to worship the three things they have been preconditioned to love:  "Henry Ford, their idol; Soma, a wonder drug; and sex" (Dusterhoof, Guynn, Patterson, Shaw, Wroten and Yuhasz  1).  The misuse of perfected technologies, especially those allowing the manipulation of the human brain and genes, have created a pleasure-seeking world where there is no such thing as spiritual experience, just pleasures of the flesh.  In the face of a transcendent religion, the...   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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4103 words
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Brave New World: The Key to Happiness - Brave New World: The Key to Happiness The novel, Brave New World is like no other, it predicts a future overpowered by technology where the people have no religion. Has Huxley written about a degrading way of life or has he discovered the key to a perfect world that should be called Utopia. The society presented in the novel is as completely rational as our own and all the precautions that are taken are needed to preserve their lifestyle. However different and horrible as the lives of individuals seem to be, in actuality they are much better than ours are....   [tags: Brave New World] 1828 words
(5.2 pages)
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Aldous Huxley And The Brave New World - Within any novel, there are always elements taken directly from the author's life and experiences. Their thoughts and opinions will also be imparted to the novel, delivering a direct message to the reader and perhaps arguing their opinions, to persuade the audience. These influences on and from his environment are apparent in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. In the 1930's, the time the book was written, many world-scale events were taking place, and society was changing as a whole. All of this no doubt affected Huxley, and resulted in one the most powerful, thought provoking novels....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley] 1433 words
(4.1 pages)
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Dehumanization In Brave New World And 1984 - Imagine a world where mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters are no longer a part of society. Imagine a world of lifeless shells of humans. Both Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, and 1984, by George Orwell, portray such societies that have been degraded by the idea of ‘utopia'. In such a distraught society it's no surprise that people will loss their humanity. For those characters that still had sanity, the impact of this world would twist their minds to the limit. To be human is to be able think and learn without any restraints....   [tags: 1984 Brave New World] 1201 words
(3.4 pages)
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Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World - Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World "Community, Identity, Stability" is the motto of the World State in the Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, a state intent on keeping itself intact. In the stable state, the people must be happy with the status quo; they must not be able to imagine a better world, and must not think of a worse one. In the stable state, a few people must be able to cope with unexpected change, but they should be unable to initiate it. In the stable state, the population must have certain proportions of satisfied citizens and innovators that can coexist....   [tags: Brave New World] 915 words
(2.6 pages)
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Last Chapter of A Brave New World - Last Chapter of A Brave New World John's eyes fluttered open and he cautiously surveyed his surroundings. Where was he taken. Who knocked him unconscious and carried him from his solitude at the lighthouse. He did not have to wait long for his answer, when he saw his friend standing over him, shaking him to awareness. "It's about time you came to," said Bernard Marx, "we've been worrying about you." Helmholtz laughed as he came around to the bed John was laying on. "Don't look at us like that, Savage....   [tags: A Brave New World] 589 words
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Brave New World: Out of Control - Brave New World: Out of Control In the 1932 satirical novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley describes an emotionless, mechanized world of the future, set mostly in London, in which individuality is eliminated, creativity is stifled, and such institutions as marriage, family, and church are unpleasant artifacts of a world long gone. In this society, people are mass-produced; human eggs are artificially engineered by technicians. Happiness is achieved through physical gratification and peace is safeguarded by the conditioning of youth and by dispensing soma, a tranquilizer....   [tags: Brave New World] 1019 words
(2.9 pages)
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Postman's Analysis of Brave New World - Postman's Analysis of Brave New World As analyzed by social critic Neil Postman, Huxley's vision of the future, portrayed in the novel Brave New World, holds far more relevance to present day society than that of Orwell's classic 1984. Huxley's vision was simple: it was a vision of a trivial society, drowned in a sea of pleasure and ignorant of knowledge and pain, slightly resembling the world of today. In society today, knowledge is no longer appreciated as it has been in past cultures, in turn causing a deficiency in intelligence and will to learn....   [tags: Brave New World] 772 words
(2.2 pages)
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Brave New World – Individual Needs - Brave New World – Individual Needs Brave New World Sometimes very advanced societies overlook the necessities of the individual. In the book Brave New World, Aldous Huxley creates two distinct societies: the Savages and the Fordians. The Fordians are technologically sophisticated, unlike the Savages. However, it is obvious that, overall, the Savages have more practical abilities, have more, complicated, ideals, and are much more advanced emotionally, which all help the individual to grow....   [tags: Brave New World] 799 words
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Emotional Disconnect in Alex Proyas’ I, Robot and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Often times issues are acknowledged and nothing is done to stop them. In other cases, they are put to an end. In Alex Proyas’ I, Robot and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, although they both demonstrate the theme of emotional disconnect and have a character who does not possess the strong loss of emotions that the other characters do, the characters in Alex Proyas’ film show a deeper understanding regarding the problems that emotional disconnect may cause them, and made an effort to stop what was happening....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley brings a futuristic novel, riddled with human follies and satire. Huxley wrote during the progressive and post-depression periods, which is reflected by the issues in which he satirizes. Brave New World is a futuristic novel that explores the hypothetical advancements of technology and effects or improvements on society. The novel sets a social system similar to that of medieval England in which people are “born” into castes. This sets the stage for the numerous social battles, which ensue as the novel develops....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley] 1263 words
(3.6 pages)
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Brave New World Ultimate Destruction - Brave New World Ultimate Destruction In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley tries to convey the belief that every invention or improvement for the “betterment” of mankind is only an instrument for his ultimate destruction. “We are,” he said, “on the horns of an ethical dilemma and to find the middle way will require all out intelligence and all out good will.” This goes for all fields of life, medical, technical, social, etc. Not only in the book, but also in real life, one can see that this belief is evidently true....   [tags: Brave New World] 1086 words
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Huxley's Brave New World - Huxley's Brave New World Today, in 21st century United States, people are concerned with the fast pace of new and growing technology, and how these advances should be used. In the last decade alone we have seen major advancements in technology; in science, cloning has become a reality, newer, more powerful drugs have been invented and, in communications, the Internet has dominated society. There is a cultural lag due to the fast rate of increasing technology, and while the governments of the world are trying to keep up their role as censors and lawmakers, we as individuals are trying to comprehend the effects it has on our lives....   [tags: Huxley Brave New World Essays]
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Humans have transformed their social organization, time and time again. Social separation has existed since the Neolithic Revolution. Very recently, we have begun to head down a dangerous path to what we can call a Brave New World. A “Brave New World” is one in which those in charge begin to intrude on the lives of individuals to the extent that the government has so much control that it begins to create human beings artificially. This path first started with encroaching technologies such as cameras and wire-tapping....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 1118 words
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Distortion is an image. An illusion of a thought or an idea that appears to have a single affect on a society; however, it provides an image on society that is completely different....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley] 967 words
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Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World The New World, a man-made Utopia, governed by its motto, Community, Identity, Stability (Huxley 3). A man-made world in every way. Human beings fertilized in bottles. Identity, gender, intelligence, position in society, all predestined. Human beings classified in the order of precedence: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Every one conditioned to be a certain way. Every one works for every one else (Huxley, 74). All man-made to ensure social stability. Is society in the New World truly better than in the 2000s....   [tags: Technology A Brave New World Essays]
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's Brave New World I stood in front of the television screen in horror and disbelief at 10 o'clock on September 11, 2001. Watching as the second plane struck the World Trade Center in a fiery ball of destruction, I thought for sure that this world as we know it was coming to an abrupt end. Seeing the first tower fall and then the second, with over 100 stories each now a pile of twisted steel and death made me want to vomit. In two short hours, the stability of America’s foundation became questionable....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 1367 words
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Free Brave New World Essays: Huxley and Shakespeare - Huxley and Shakespeare "Do they read Shakespeare?" asked the Savage as they walked, on their way to the Bio-chemical Laboratories, past the School Library. "Certainly not," said the Head Mistress, blushing. In Aldous Huxley's “Brave New World", allusions to William Shakespeare and his works emphasize the contrast between the ""Brave New World"" and the world in Shakespeare's time and even the current time period. Enhancing the work's meaning, the allusions and character's reactions to the allusions reveal the positive and negative aspects of our society today....   [tags: Brave New World] 543 words
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The Society in Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World - The Society in Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World The society in A Brave New World is very similar to the society of today. Though the society is scientifically created, it still shows much resemblance to that of our naturally formed society today. The system of classes is nearly identical to the class system of the present. The main difference is the scientific engineering of the people in each class. Obviously, in our society people are not altered scientifically in order to fit into a social class....   [tags: A Brave New World] 488 words
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Dangers of a Totalitarian Society Exposed in Brave New World - Dangers of a Totalitarian Society Exposed in Brave New World On a superficial level Brave New World is the portrait of a perfect society. The citizens of this Utopia live in a society that is free of depression and most of the social-economic problems that trouble the world today. All aspects of life are controlled for the people of this society: population numbers, social class, and intellectual ability....   [tags: Brave New World] 2698 words
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Brave New World - A Wake-Up Call for Humanity - Brave New World - A Wake-Up Call for Humanity (this essay has problems with the format) Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in England, human society has had to struggle to adapt to new technology. There is a shift from traditional society to a modern one. Within the last ten years we have seen tremendous advances in science and technology, and we are becoming more and more socially dependent on it. In the Brave New World, Huxley states that we are moving in the direction of Utopia much more rapidly than anyone had ever anticipated....   [tags: Brave New World]
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Brave New World: Hitler and the Iron Curtain - Brave New World: Hitler and the Iron Curtain In his foreword to the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisioned what the world would be like if we were all "under the iron curtain" when he wrote: "To make them love it is the task assigned, in present- day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda…." (Huxley page #) Thus, through hypnopaedic teaching (brainwashing), mandatory attendance to community gatherings, and allusions to prominent political dictators, Huxley bitterly satirized totalitarian propaganda and political technique to point out the problems of a dystopian society....   [tags: Brave New World] 752 words
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Utopian Society in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - In the novel Brave New World written by Aldous Huxley a dystopia is presented of a Utopian society where happiness is brought through a drug and your predestined life follows. Aldous Huxley conveys different conflicts with characters being isolated from the society they are being forced to live within. In which, these characters, are brought about reliance of soma, a drug, to stabilize their life. As well as this, the novel expresses the on going battles of having a society that is "perfect". Therefore, because of the isolated, delusional nonperfected-society, the World State introduced in Brave New World defines a Utopian Society....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 2036 words
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Free Essays - A Personal Utopia in Brave New World - A Personal Utopia: An Analysis of a Key Passage in Brave New World The key passage of Aldous Huxley’s Brace New World takes place after John has been arrested and is a conversation with Mond. When John and Mond speak of ideal societies, a major part of Brave New World, the aspect of human nature which makes us search continuously for our personal Utopia, becomes apparent. In Mond’s study, the sacrifices each character makes in order to find a Utopia are interconnected. The search for a personal Utopia reveals Huxley’s view on human nature of sacrificing everything to live with self-fulfillment....   [tags: Brave New World] 977 words
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Freedom is the Cost of Stability in Brave New World -        David Grayson once said that "Commandment Number One of any truly civilized society is this: Let people be different". Difference, or individuality, however, may not be possible under a dictatorial government. Aldous Huxley's satirical novel Brave New World shows that a government-controlled society often places restraints upon its citizens, which results in a loss of social and mental freedom. These methods of limiting human behavior are carried out by the conditioning of the citizens, the categorical division of society, and the censorship of art and religion....   [tags: Brave New World]
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Dystopia in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Dystopia in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World It's hard to imagine yet somehow so extremely close to us is the possibility of a world of ideal perfection where there is no room or acceptance of individuality. Yet, as we strive towards the growth of technology and improvement of our daily living we come closer to closing the gap between the freedom of emotions, self understanding, and of speech and the devastation of a dystopia. A utopia, or perfect world, gone awry is displayed in Aldous Huxley's provocative novel Brave New World....   [tags: Brave New World] 2053 words
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Happiness in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - When we look to define happiness, many different ideas come to mind. Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary uses three definitions for happiness: good fortune, a state of well being and contentment, and a pleasurable satisfaction. In Brave New World, Aldus Huxley argues that a society can redefine happiness through the government’s manipulation of the environment and the human mind itself. The government accomplishes this by mind conditioning throughout the process of maturing, keeping a caste-based society, and obliterating problems....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 717 words
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Welcome, You’ve Got a Brave New World - Welcome, You’ve Got a Brave New World                            The task of predicting the future is difficult at best, yet Huxley’s predictions of the future have proven to be eerily accurate in several areas. Many of Huxley’s predictions are being realized today, have already been realized or will be realized in a few short years. These specific predictions, which are closely related to today are our sexual practices, an obsession with youth and beauty, the minimal role of parents and the practice of religion.    In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World people treat sex as a form of entertainment rather than an expression of love between a couple.  Most forms of entertainment in Brave...   [tags: Brave New World] 2019 words
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Brave New World: Can Man Create Utopia? - Brave New World: Can Man Create Utopia. Brave New World, a novel by Aldous Huxley, was published during the time, socialism and dictatorship were the key concepts of the day. These governments believed that having total power would engender a perfect society. Karl Marx (Bernard Marx), and Nikolai Lenin (Linina), are two men who decide to pursue this concept. Through examples of these characters, it is demonstrated that a government that completely controls a nation will fail. Many of the ideas that the governments thought would contribute to success were the cause of their failure....   [tags: Brave New World] 703 words
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The Pursuit of Happyness in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 - Would one rather have a life with no control over what happens; or would one want to have a life with some power, but a limited pursuit of happiness. The Government in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 let the citizens do whatever they want to do. The only exception is that they are not to be left alone to think about life and the enjoyments that are involved; they are supposed to live and forget. Illegal activities are considered normal in these novels. America’s society compared to these two Utopias is completely different....   [tags: Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451]
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Brave New World: Utopia Without Shakespeare? - Brave New World: Utopia Without Shakespeare. The Utopia of the future- something every human seemingly wants, but is it worth it to throw away everything for happiness and live in a world where only a few people can recall a man named Shakespeare. In Aldous Huxley's satirical novel, "Brave New World," this cellophaned world, polished and regulated to perfection, is a reality. In this Utopia, people like Bernard Marx, an intelligent and adverse Alpha, the highest class of humans, are conditioned to worship the Great Ford, to believe everything the Controllers say, to amuse themselves with sports, "feelies" and non-utilitarian relationships and, most of all, to take soma, a drug simulating...   [tags: Brave New World] 1115 words
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Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World London, the year is a.f. 632 . Your life consists of three things, sex, drugs and violence. Although an inconceivable thought, it is not far from our present culture. In 1932, Aldous Huxley finished a novel that can now be seen as a social foreshadowing that circulates in the bloodstream of contemporary American culture. Sex, drugs, and total social perversion; Brave New World is a racy novel that, for its time, was nothing short of a prophecy. When Huxley wrote this book, little did he know that his fictitious novel would become a desensitized reality....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 1525 words
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Analysis and Critique of Brave New World - Analysis and Critique of Brave New World The novel opens in the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre, in the years A.F., or After Ford. Ford is the God-surrogate, a corruption of the name Freud, the controversial psychosexual psychologist. The Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning is leading a tour group of young students around a lab. He explains the scientific process by which human beings are fertilized and custom-made, and shows them the Social Predestination room, where workers create the social castes....   [tags: A Brave New World Aldous Huxley Essays] 1010 words
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Experiencing Brave New World in 1998 - Experiencing Brave New World in 1998 Since good literature transports the reader to immersion, absorption and sensation of plot, the successful literary experience often unveils a segment of the self's concealed character. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World immerses the reader in a State scientifically constructed to produce perpetual happiness without hardship. Six centuries into the future, a world leader has designed a civilization flabbily devoid of balancing challenges by eliminating illness, geriatrics, fear of death, passion and love, parenting, poverty, and pursuit of anything....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World Essays]
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's Brave New World In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley deftly creates a society that is indeed quite stable. Although they are being mentally manipulated, the members of this world are content with their lives, and the presence of serious conflict is minimal, if not nonexistent. For the most part, the members of this society have complete respect and trust in their superiors, and those who don’t are dealt with in a peaceful manner as to keep both society and the heretic happy. Maintained by cultural values, mental conditioning, and segregation, the idea of social stability as demonstrated in Brave New World is, in my opinion, both insightful and intriguing....   [tags: Social Stability Brave New World Essays] 1172 words
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Brave New World by Huxley and Future Predictions - Brave New World by Huxley and Future Predictions Due to the “Enlightenment” belief in understanding through science and the scientific innovations of the “Industrial Revolution” during the 18th and 19th Centuries in Europe and America, the notion that society could be vastly improved through scientific progress pervaded “western” culture. Naturally, these advances were expected to culminate in the 20th Century. However, the shear brutality and scale of World War I and the hopelessness of the world economic depression of the 1930’s destroyed prior expectations and new socio-economic and political movements emerged, such as: Social Darwinism, Eugenics, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, Fordism (whic...   [tags: Brave New World Huxley Essays]
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The Absence of Social Conflict Social Stability in Brave New World - The Absence of Social Conflict Social Stability in Brave New World In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley introduces the dystopia of a society created on the principle of social stability at all costs. Huxley wrote this book in 1932 hoping to warn future generations of what he feared might happen if society did not do something to stop the inevitable. The leaders of our society today hope for and work towards social stability without taking away primitive rights. Social stability can only be achieved by a society whose beliefs in social and ethical issues are never challenged....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 1239 words
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The Use of Soma to Shape and Control Society in Huxley's Brave New World - The Use of Soma to Shape and Control Society in Huxley's Brave New World The future of the world is a place of thriving commerce and stability. Safety and happiness are at an all-time high, and no one suffers from depression or any other mental disorders. There are no more wars, as peace and harmony spread to almost every corner of the world. There is no sickness, and people are predestined to be happy and content in their social class. But if anything wrong accidentally occurs, there is a simple solution to the problem, which is soma....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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Negative Effects of Technology Depicted in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Negative Effects of Technology Depicted in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Imagine a life where the technology is so great that no one ever has to be worried about being sad or bothered by all the day to day stress. In Brave New World published in 1932, Aldous Huxley brings the reader into the future of London to see just what technology can do to a society. As the novel opens, the reader learns about how the futuristic London is a Utopia, what life is like, and all about the great technological advancements....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World by Aldous Huxley was published in 1932 after two major global events- World War Two from 1914-1918 and The Great Depression of 1929-1933. These two events changed the way people saw the world and made people see the events were beyond the control of individuals and even governments. Also at this time the world was seeing the rise in technology and the view that science could help solve some of the problems. Much of the technology has been developed because of the war and the mass of people had suffered because of it....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley Essays] 2288 words
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Sympathy for Two Characters in Brave New World - Sympathy for Two Characters in Brave New World Bernard Marx and John "the savage" are both outcasts in their societies. Haunted by their own inadequacies and inability to fit in. They are the two characters in "Brave New World" whom, for numerous reasons and in many ways, the reader can feel the most sympathy for. Bernard's physical appearance was one of his main insecurities and so he can be sympathised with because of it. As an Alpha male, society expected him to be taller, better looking and more masculine than he was....   [tags: Brave New World Bernard Max John Essays] 1973 words
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Brave New World - Is Individuality a Threat to Society, or a Gift to Society? - As man has progressed through the ages, there has been, essentially, one purpose. That purpose is to arrive at a utopian society, where everyone is happy, disease is nonexistent, and strife, anger, or sadness is unheard of. Only happiness exists. But when confronted with Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, we come to realize that this is not, in fact, what the human soul really craves. In fact, Utopian societies are much worse than those of today. In a utopian society, the individual, who among others composes the society, is lost in the melting pot of semblance and world of uninterest....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley] 1573 words
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The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Since the first day that humans were put on this earth, they have been curious and have searched for ways to become more efficient. Throughout the years they have created tools to better serve them, created clothing to keep them warm, built homes to protect them from the elements, and produced transportation methods to transport them across the world. In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932), the human race has evolved to being extremely efficient in everything that they do....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley]
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Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World One may think that the society in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a gross representation of the future, but perhaps our society isn’t that much different. In his foreword to the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisioned this statement when he wrote: "To make them love it is the task assigned, in present-day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda...." Thus, through hypnopaedic teaching (brainwashing), mandatory attendance to community gatherings, and the use of drugs to control emotions, Huxley bitterly satirized the society in which we live....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 864 words
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