Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "Bram Stoker Dracula"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Gender in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Gender in Bram Stoker's Dracula During the Victorian Era, women struggled to attain gender equality by challenging the traditional roles that defined them. These women no longer wanted to remain passive and obey the demands of their husbands nor be domestic and the caretakers of their children. They strived to attain the role of a 'New Woman', an intelligent, liberated individual who was able to openly express her ideas (Eltis 452). Whereas some women were successful in attaining this new role, others were still dominated by their male counterparts....   [tags: Bram Stoker Dracula Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
2702 words
(7.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Use of Secondary Sources in Bram Stoker's "Dracula" - Bram Stoker uses secondary sources all throughout his novel in order to enhance the novel. He inserts a number of journal entries, newspaper articles, etc. instead of using a narrative point of view. By doing this, he has helped the reader understand more about what is going on, almost as if they are getting a behind-the-scenes view on the story, emotionally and physically. If Stoker had only used a narrative point of view, the reader wouldn’t know the character’s thoughts, emotions, or anything they were feeling at that moment....   [tags: Bram Stoker, secondary sources, Dracula] 626 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Homosocial Friendships in Bram Stoker’s Dracula - Bram Stoker was born into a lower-class Irish family in late 1847. He grew up with six siblings, at least four of which were brothers. Throughout his childhood, Stoker was an invalid, sickened with an unknown disease. Many days were spent listening to his mother tell stories of Ireland. It is thought that her stories played a large role in his writing (Stoker 5). Perhaps due to Stoker’s childhood illness and relationship with his brothers, his writing in Dracula exhibited a great deal of homosociality, the idea of same-sex relationships on a social level, rather than romantically....   [tags: Bram Stoker, Dracula]
:: 1 Works Cited
1065 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dracula by Bram Stoker - Evil never conquers because good always overcomes it. A good example of this is the book Dracula by Bram Stoker because the author expresses the nature of good vs. evil. Dracula wants to come to London because he wants to turn everyone into vampires. The basic background of the book Dracula is when Jonathan Harker, a realtor who is sent to Transylvania to complete a transaction with Dracula so he can come to England. What Harker does not know is that Dracula has a plan for world domination....   [tags: Dracula Bram Stoker Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1720 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
What makes "Good" Characters Good in "Dracula" by Bram Stoker - In the book Dracula by Bram Stoker, he portrays the good characters as people who would wilfully go out of their way to help people without expecting anything in return. Some examples of this would be Dr. Van Helsing and his friends and people who try to help Lucy get back to normal. An example of why Van Helsing is so good is that when Dr. Seward asked him to come help Lucy when she was sick, he stopped whatever work he was doing and went to help Dr. Van Helsing was a vital part in helping to stop Dracula because he was an expert on Vampires....   [tags: Dracula, Bram Stoker, good, characters,] 631 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Repressed Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Repressed Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula       Perhaps no work of literature has ever been composed without being a product of its era, mainly because the human being responsible for writing it develops their worldview within a particular era.  Thus, with Bram Stoker's Dracula, though we have a vampire myth novel filled with terror, horror, and evil, the story is a thinly veiled disguise of the repressed sexual mores of the Victorian era.  If we look to critical interpretation and commentary to win support for such a thesis, we find it aplenty "For erotic Dracula certainly is.  'Quasi-pornography' one critic labels it.  Another describes it as a 'kind of incestuous, necrophilious, ora...   [tags: Bram Stoker Dracula Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1412 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula is Anti-Christian - Bram Stoker's Dracula is Anti-Christian There are many ways that Bram Stoker's Dracula can be considered Anti- Christian by showing of Anti-Christian values and perversions of the Christian religion. In chapter one as Jonathan Harker is traveling to Castle Dracula he is met by several people. When he meets these people and tells them where he is going they cross themselves along with doing several other superstiscious actions. One of the women he meets gives him a crucifix to protect him on his journey....   [tags: Bram Stoker Dracula Essays] 1507 words
(4.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula - Bram Stoker's Dracula In act 2 scene 6 and act 3 scene 6 of the play ‘Dracula’, the playwrite creates impressive tension by using spine-chilling, ghostly settings, and slyly showing us situations in which characters such as vampires, prey on vulnerable characters such as Mina. Also, he uses soliloquies to give the opposing character no power. Also, by using soliloquies in these scenes he gives the point of view from the weak characters’ eyes. Firstly, the playwrite creates impressive tension by using shadowy, ghostly settings....   [tags: Bram Stoker Dracula Essays] 649 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Female Characters in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Female Characters in Bram Stoker's Dracula Having studied Bram Stoker's Dracula as part of my GCSE English Course, I am going to consider the representation of women in the novel. The three main characters I will study are Mina, Lucy, and the three female vampires (belonging to Dracula). I am going to consider the similarities and differences of each character, and how well they compare to traditional Victorian women. I will support my answers with quotes and evidence. During the early twentieth century, the traditional Victorian ideal would be a lady of leisure....   [tags: Dracula Bram Stoker Victorian Women Essays] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
An Analysis of Bram Stoker's Dracula - Bram Stoker’s Dracula is the story about how the small company of men and a woman lead by Professor Abraham Van Helsing combats against Count Dracula, who moves from Transylvania to England in order to manipulate people as “foul things of the night like him, without heart or conscience, preying on the bodies and the souls of those [they] love best” (223). Stoker employs an epistolary format in this novel and nowadays, Dracula becomes one of popular literary works representing epistolary novels written in the nineteenth century....   [tags: literature, epistolary representation]
:: 2 Works Cited
879 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula - Bram Stoker's Dracula Bram Stoker's Dracula is one of the most renowned British novels of all time. It has left its marks on many aspects of literature and film. Many thematic elements are present throughout the story and have been interpreted in many ways. Stoker uses his characters to manifest the themes that he wishes to imply. Three themes that present themselves throughout the book are the theme of Christian Redemption, science and technology, and sexual expression. Christian Redemption is shown in many ways throughout the book....   [tags: Dracular Bram Stoker] 1686 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula, by Bram Stoker - In the year 1897, Bram Stoker releases the crown jewel of the 20th century: his vampire epic Dracula. Ever since Dracula, Transylvania, and castles have been associative of vampirism, the world has become “bloody”. There are slight deviations to the novel, but the majority of them are fairly partial to the novel. Worldly views show Dracula as an old man with a new face. The inception of Bram Stoker’s Dracula has been the melting pot of the recreations and incarnations of the world’s deadliest, bloodsucking vampire, Count Dracula....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 904 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Dracula by Bram Stoker - As the saying goes, “Women can do everything Men can do.” In the Gothic Novel Dracula by Bram Stoker, there is a constant theme of sexuality, from both male and females in society. In the Victorian era, the roles of male and females have caused a lot of tension. After reading Dracula, some would argue the roles men and women hold in society. As mentioned in Dr. Seward’s Dairy from Val Halsing., “Ah, that wonderful Madam Mina. She has man’s brain—a brain that a man should have were he much gifted—and a woman’s heart....   [tags: Men, Women, Gender Roles, Gothic Novel]
:: 3 Works Cited
971 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula and the Fears of Victorian England - In periods of cultural insecurity, when there are fears of regression and degeneration, the longing for strict border controls around the definition of gender, as well as race, class, and nationality, becomes especially intense. If the different races can be kept in their places, if the various classes can be held in their proper districts of the city, and if men and women can be fixed in their separate spheres, many hope, apocalypse can be prevented and we can preserve a comforting sense of identity and permanence in the face of that relentless specter of millennial change....   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2747 words
(7.8 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Paternalism in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Paternalism in Bram Stoker's Dracula      Paternalism is the domination of a society by a male or parental figure that leads or governs much like the way a father would direct his family.  In Victorian society, the idea of paternalism was prevalent.  The idea was also frequently used as a motif in western literature.  Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, published in 1897, depicts a paternalistic society through a repression of the female sex and a continuous exaltation of the domineering male sex.  Stoker communicates this idea through an abundant use of prominent male characters, the presence of merely two women, who are each extremely suppressed, either sexually or intellectually, and...   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
908 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Hypnotism’s Influence on Bram Stoker and Dracula - The use of hypnotism is extensive throughout the last few chapters of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Van Helsing places Mina in a hypnotic state or trance numerous times in order to locate Dracula and to learn about his premeditated actions. Stoker’s great use of hypnotism is what leads to Dracula’s destruction in the end. However, what influences Stoker to use hypnotherapy in order to kill off the most important character in his book. Taking a New Historical approach can help a reader understand how Stoker was influenced by his culture to incorporate hypnosis into Dracula and why he chose it as a method for destroying Dracula, while healing Mina....   [tags: Character Analysis, Dracula] 2905 words
(8.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula - Victorian Women were highly held back in their full potential. Their main role in the household was to “be happy - a sunbeam in the house, making others happy” (Hardy, E.J. 1887). On top of this, Women in the Victorian era were not allowed to display their sexuality or “tempt” men in public; they were meant to be submissive and meek (Causey S., 2008). The Victorian era lasted from 1837 til 1901, with women being punished everyday for crimes that are nowadays just part of living for a woman. Bram Stoker was born during this era and wrote his most famous novel, Dracula (Miller, E....   [tags: WOmens Discourse, Vicctorian Era]
:: 4 Works Cited
566 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Comparison of Dracula and Bram Stoker's Dracula - Compare/Contrast Dracula and Bram Stoker's Dracula A noticeable difference in the way movies have changed over the years is evident when comparing and contrasting two films of different eras which belong to the same genre and contain the same subject matter. Two vampire movies, Dracula and Bram Stoker's Dracula, present an interesting example of this type of study. Comparing the 1931 version of Dracula, starring Bela Lugosi, with Frances Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula 1993 version yields some similarities....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1456 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Literature of Psychology in Dracula by Bram Stoker - ... As Harker tries to comfort the old lady, so he can presume his journey, she reaches over and offers him a crucifix off her neck. Harker does not know what to do, as he is an English Churchman, but he accepts the crucifix to calm her down. As his journey continues, Harker finally reaches the territory of the Mansion. Upon entering the mansion, he notices Count Dracula, “His face was strong-very strong-aquiline, with high bridge of the thin nose and peculiarly arched nostrils; with lofty domed forehead, and hair growing scantily round the temples but profusely elsewhere.” (Stoker 165)....   [tags: analysis, introspection, experiment] 1367 words
(3.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Good and Evil in Dracula by Bram Stoker - What if in between good and evil did not exist. Where would you stand. Today, it is believed that everyone was born with the slightest bit of evil in them. In the Victorian Era, this theory would be considered very wrong, because one would either be all good, or all evil. In Dracula, by Bram Stoker, good versus evil was symbolised throughout the book as two antithetical forces without an in between. By clearly demonstrating the relationship between the dualistic ideas of intuition versus logic, good characters facing figures comparable to the devil, and symbolism within the natural world, Bram Stoker effectively recounts a “holy war” between the antagonistic forces of good and evil....   [tags: evil, good, world, natural] 635 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Feminist Interpretation of Bram Stoker's Dracula - In his Literary Theory: The Basics, H. Bertens classifies stereotypes of women in literature into a number of categories; dangerous seductress, self-sacrificing angel, dissatisfied shrew, and defenseless lamb, completely incapable of self-sufficiency, or self-control, and dependent on male intervention. Bertens concludes that the primary objective of these women – or “constructions” – is to serve a “not-so-hidden purpose: the continued cultural and social domination of males”. One such novel that came under feminist scrutiny for these particular reasons was Bram Stoker’s Dracula, although this perlustration didn’t occur until 70 years after Stoker originally penned his masterpiece....   [tags: Women's Role, Allusion] 1558 words
(4.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
An Analysis of the New Woman Phenomenon Present in Bram Stokers Dracula - The gothic vampire classic Dracula, written by Bram Stoker, is one of the most well known novels of the nineteenth century. The story focuses on a vampire named Dracula who travels to England in search of new blood, but who eventually is found out and driven away by a group of newly minted vampire hunters. A major social change that was going on during the late nineteenth century, around the time of that this novel was being written, was the changing roles of women in British society which constituted as the “New Woman” movement and the novel seems to explore and worry about this subject extensively....   [tags: new woman, dracula, bram stoker]
:: 6 Works Cited
1730 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula as the Persecuted Outsider in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Dracula as the Persecuted Outsider in Bram Stoker's Dracula Bram Stoker's Dracula is highly acclaimed and has received many different interpretations which deal with complex symbolisms and metaphors. These interpretations often require a great deal of knowledge in psychology, political science, anthropology, and other non-literary disciplines. These interpretations may be valid, as they are related to the disciplines on which their arguments are based, but the true power of the novel is due to a very simple theme that lies beneath the other, more convoluted interpretations....   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1692 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula and Women in Bram Stoker's Dracula - In the 19th century Bram Stoker wrote the infamous novel, Dracula. This novel was composed in the style of letters, journal entries, newspaper articles and telegrams in order to convey to the reader a realistic story. The story of Dracula is about an ancient vampire who moves to London from his native country of Transylvania. In London, Dracula seduces and bites a young woman by the name of Lucy Westenra. When Lucy falls sick, no one knows how to help her because while Dracula has bitten her many times she has always been in a trance....   [tags: essays research papers] 1796 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula, by Bram Stoker - The term Gothic originates from the Northern tribes that invaded Europe in the 4th, 5th, and 6th centuries. When founded, Gothic writings were created to express new feelings toward order, nature, and emotion. Resulting from connecting all key elements together, Bram Stoker created one of the most well written Gothic novels of all time. Stoker includes gothic elements in his characterization, setting, and plot to expand the consciousness of his characters and readers, while simultaneously expanding the boundaries of the Victorian World....   [tags: Gothic Theme]
:: 2 Works Cited
1020 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dracula by Bram Stoker - Throughout the Victorian era, a woman’s sole purpose was to marry, produce children, keep the house clean and have dinner on the table by the time their husband returned from work. They were restricted to working tedious jobs at minimum wage until they were married and were not allowed to receive a real education. Once married, a woman was expected to become a fulltime mother and house wife tending to the needs in the home on command. All these lovely skills were that of the traditional Victorian women....   [tags: victorian era, women's role]
:: 1 Works Cited
1158 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula as a Romantic Myth - Bram Stoker's Dracula as a Romantic Myth In this paper, I will present my reflections and thoughts on the myth of Dracula in particular, and the vampyre in general, as a love story and show the deeply rooted links between the two myths and Christianity, as refracted through the prism of Francis Ford Coppola's film Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992). One of the most well known aspects of a vampyre is that it must feed upon the blood of the living; Dracula must drink to survive, (akin to people drinking the blood of Christ--the blood of divine life)....   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
4302 words
(12.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Treatment of Women in Bram Stoker's Dracula - The Treatment of Women in Bram Stoker's Dracula   In reading Bram Stoker's Dracula, I find the treatment of the two main female characters-- Lucy Westenra and Mina Harker-- especially intriguing. These two women are two opposite archetypes created by a society of threatened men trying to protect themselves. Lucy is the Medusa archetype. She is physically attractive, and wins the heart of any man who comes near her (e.g. Arthur, Quincey, Jack, and Van Helsing). Her chief quality is sensual beauty, but her sexual desire is repressed and not allowed to communicate....   [tags: Dracula Essays Females]
:: 1 Works Cited
1042 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Victorian Women in Dracula - Bram Stoker’s “Dracula,” came to print in 1897, at the height of Nineteenth century Victorian life in Europe, a progressively modern era that saw much medical and technological advancement. This era brought with it the contentious idea of an empowered woman, the “New Woman,” a woman who aspires to be educated as well as sexually and economically independent. Stoker gives a contrasting view of this notion in “Dracula.” While the main characters, Lucy and Mina, are clearly opposite in personality, they are both portrayed as unequal, defenseless objects that are to be protected and desired....   [tags: Dracula, Bram Stoker] 947 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Novel Dracula - ... She is seen as a marginal figure whose narrow-minded thoughts make her vulnerable in society and consequently Dracula’s first victim in England. Since women began changing and challenging the views of society, Lucy’s desire to break the social confines grew larger, therefore making her vulnerable to Dracula’s advances. At one point she says to Mina, "Why can't they let a girl marry three men, or as many as want her, and save all this trouble?" This symbolises her reluctance to marry one man, hence suggests her subtle promiscuity and desire to break the social stigma confined to women....   [tags: story and character analysis] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
A Summary of Bram Stoker's Dracula - A Summary of Bram Stoker's Dracula Dracula is an epistolary novel, meaning that is composed from letters, journal and diary entries, telegrams, and newspaper clippings. Jonathan Harker, Mina Murray (later Mina Harker), and Dr. Seward write the largest contributions to the novel although the writings of Lucy Westenra and Abraham Van Helsing constitute some key parts of the book. The novel has a slightly journalistic feel, as it is a harrowing account supposedly written by the people who witnessed the book's events....   [tags: English Literature] 1055 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Cultural Aspect of Dracula in Bram Stoker's Dracula - The Cultural Aspect of Dracula in Bram Stoker's Dracula In Bram Stoker' s Dracula, vampires act as principles of mixing in many ways. Dracula comes from Transylvania, which is a land of many people, and his castle is located on the border of three states. Dracula himself describes the place as the "whirlpool of European races", and boasts, "in [his] veins flows the blood of many brave races" (p. 28). Dracula wishes to go to London, to the crowded streets with a variety of people. He takes blood from everybody, and gives it to others (Mina, albeit for his own purposes)....   [tags: Papers] 975 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dracula by Bram Stoker: Modern Man to Enduring Romance - In Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Dracula is representative of the superhuman ideal that man is striving to achieve. Dracula is a strong willed, powerful, brilliant masculine figure, and through these characteristics, he appeals to the contemporary reader. By the late 20th and early 21st century, vampires have been transformed into creatures that offer endless happiness and immortality on earth. Such a transformation can be seen in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 production of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Instead of viewing the Faustian dream of endless self-gratification and fulfillment as potentially evil, popular culture depicts these satanic creatures as morally justified, and actually good....   [tags: superhuman, power, mina, elizabeta]
:: 4 Works Cited
1694 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Inverted Gender Roles: Dracula by Bram Stoker - There’s a Hidden “Monster” in Everyone In Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, Stoker’s use of inverted gender roles allows readers to grasp the sense of obscureness throughout, eventually leading to the reader’s realization that these characters are rather similar to the “monster” which they call Dracula. Despite being in the Victorian era, Stoker’s use of sexuality in the novel contributes to the reasoning of obscureness going against the Victorian morals and values. Throughout the novel the stereotypical roles of the Victorian man and woman are inverted to draw attention to the similarities between Dracula and the characters....   [tags: monster, gender roles]
:: 6 Works Cited
1455 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Style and Lore within Bram Stoker's Dracula - A man of the night; a creature of human destruction, Dracula is a force to be reckoned with. Johnathan Harker struggles throughout trying to escape from or stand against the count. Bram Stoker uses his personal styles to create a creature of Transylvanian lore known as Dracula. Bram uses several different styles to tell his tale of the count and Jonathan. Bram’s novel is written in a gothic style sometimes referred to as a gothic romance (Garen 3). Bram’s use of the supernatural and the vampyric character as the main character....   [tags: character and story analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
686 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Different Perception of Women: Dracula by Bram Stoker - In the late 19th century, when Dracula by Bram Stoker is written, women were only perceived as conservative housewives, only tending to their family’s needs and being solely dependent of their husbands to provide for them. This novel portrays that completely in accordance to Mina Harker, but Lucy Westenra is the complete opposite. Lucy parades around in just her demeanor as a promiscuous and sexual person. While Mina only cares about learning new things in order to assist her soon-to-be husband Jonathan Harker....   [tags: lucy, housewives, women]
:: 7 Works Cited
1857 words
(5.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Embracing Female Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, written in 1897 during the Victorian era depicts and delves through the historical context of what society was like in the past. His extraordinary piece places a strong emphasis on sexuality by contrasting it with the conventional and stereotypical views towards sexuality that was once embellished during his life time. By painting an elaborate picture of the conservative society Stoker once grew up in, I contend that through his main female characters, he pursues to epitomize and challenge the Victorian notion of sexuality by incorporating female characters with strong sexual desires....   [tags: society, supression, victorian era]
:: 1 Works Cited
1997 words
(5.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Victorian Perception of Women and Vampires in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Despite popular culture today with shows like The Vampire Diaries where vampires are often continuing their daily lives as if they are human and being the heroes to their friends and/or family, Dracula is a depiction of how vampires have, for centuries, been exposed as bloodthirsty, supernatural beings with sexual appeal. The way women are portrayed in Bram Stoker’s, Dracula, is a result of the Victorian ideals. Once Dracula begins to feed on the women, they become bloodthirsty temptresses which are exactly what society fears and try to prevent....   [tags: popular culture, women]
:: 8 Works Cited
1492 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Comparing Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the 1972 Film "Blacula" - Bram Stoker’s Dracula is not only a classic story of men and monsters, but a dramatic reactionary work to the perceived threats to Victorian society in nineteenth century England. In modern times there have been many film adaptations of the novel, each developing a unique analysis or criticism of the literary text within the framework of the society and time period in which it was created. The 1972 film Blacula is one of the most culturally specific variations on the story of Dracula, and highlights many of the themes and messages found in Stoker’s original text....   [tags: dracula, movies, films]
:: 2 Works Cited
1921 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Bram Stoker’s Dracula - In the 19th century, this basis of scary and thriller books started to emerge. This essay will be about who Dracula enticed women, how his detainer was unsettling and demonic. How the era in which the novel was written plays a part in the ideas of Dracula and how behaves; with such things as women, food, and Harker. The Victorian era definitely influenced the writing of the time through reflections of exploitation of women and a certain darkness in ones self, also explains of mystery and suspense....   [tags: scary, thriller books]
:: 5 Works Cited
1081 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Crusade to Exterminate Vampires in Dracula's Inferno by Bram Stoker - ... In Carfax, Jonathan has been locked away and has grown curious as to what the Count does. He discovers the location of Dracula’s room by accident when the Count was climbing out of his window. With this information, he climbs his way across the wall of the estate to attempt to enter Dracula’s room. The only thing I found was a great heap of gold in one corner--gold of all kinds, Roman, and British, and Austrian, and Hungarian and Greek and Turkish money, covered with a film of dust, as though it had lain long on the ground....   [tags: sin, count, hell]
:: 1 Works Cited
2242 words
(6.4 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Most Famous Vampire: Dracula Written by Bram Stoker - The vampire is probably the only creature of which this many different myths have been written. However, there is not a clear source that states where these myths have originated from. Over the years many myths have disappeared but the ones that are still discussed today often originated in early Romania, Serbia and Hungary. One of the biggest myths is the one where someone who has been bitten by a vampire becomes a vampire themselves. However there are some variations to this myth, some say that if a pregnant woman only looks at a vampire she would give birth to a vampire or if your baby was born with the amniotic sac still intact the mother were to become a vampire when she was about to di...   [tags: bite, habits] 1230 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Altering Perceptions of Bram Stoker’s Dracula - ...  Freddie, being an intelligent individual, became more and more skeptical because it was extremely rare to experience low risk with the high probability of high gains. Under the realization that Freddie could not complete this task all on his own, he enlisted the help of some of his friends. Though Freddie was experienced he thought the help of his friends would ensure that the Count would receive everything that he desired plus more. When Bernard, tyler (Tyco), and Fannie Mac arrived at the Counts elaborate mansion they were all equally surprised at how the count carried himself....   [tags: blood, corporate tycoon, investor]
:: 1 Works Cited
1424 words
(4.1 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Gothic Theme in Dracula by Bram Stoker - The Gothic Theme in Dracula by Bram Stoker Bram Stoker's Dracula is a true Gothic novel that belongs on any gothic literature course. Focusing in on the recurring themes, characters and settings used throughout the novel one sees how Dracula has set the standard for Gothic literature today. The theme in Dracula is that classic Gothic theme of the epic battle of good versus evil. In this novel this is expressed in a very direct way, there is never any question as to who is right and who is wrong....   [tags: Papers] 897 words
(2.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Dracula- Bram Stoker - Dracula- Bram Stoker In my opinion, this is one of the greatest horror books that have ever been written. It is excellent. The book begins with Jonathon Harker- one of the main characters, writing in his journal. From this we see that he is on his way to Transylvania, 'one of the wildest and least known portions of Europe' where he is visiting one of the clients of the accountants firm that he works for in his castle, Castle Dracula. From Budapest, he travels to Bistritz where he stays in the Golden Krone Hotel....   [tags: English Literature] 914 words
(2.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Film Analysis of Dracula by Bram Stoker - Film Analysis of Dracula by Bram Stoker Bram Stoker’s Dracula was filmed and produce in 1992 by Francis Ford Coppola. Based on the infamous vampire novel Dracula in the 1890s. The film stars Gary Oldman as Dracula throughout the film, the hero Harker is played by Keanu Reeves. Winona Ryder play two parts of the film, one is the wife of Dracula the opening sequence and later plays the fiancée of Harker reincarnated. And Anthony Hopkins play the priest of the Christian church of the opening sequence and also does the voice-over for the film....   [tags: Papers] 692 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Comparing the Nature of Terror in the Gothic Novels, Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - The two Gothic novels, Dracula and Frankenstein, introduced two of the most terrifying characters throughout all of literature. Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula, and Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, both present elements of terror and create a tense mood and a gruesome picture. In both of these novels the other characters are not able to see these evil creatures actions. Although both of these novels depict truly evil minds, Dracula is far more terrifying than Frankenstein due in part to its bloodthirsty vampires, mysterious deaths, and dark gothic tone....   [tags: dracula, frankenstein] 695 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula - Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula      The legendary creature Dracula has mesmerized readers and viewers for nearly a century. In Bram Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, the infamous monster affects each reader in a different way. Some find the greatest fear to be the sacrilegious nature of his bloodsucking attacks, while others find themselves most afraid of Dracula's shadow-like omnipresent nature. The fascination with Dracula has assimilated into all parts of society. Dracula can now be seen selling breakfast cereals, making appearances on Sesame Street, and on the silver screen....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast]
:: 3 Works Cited
1154 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula - Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula Evil features in both ‘Dracula’ and ‘Frankenstein’ but the personification of this evil is different in both novels. A feeling of menace and doom pervades ‘Dracula’ because of his supernatural powers. One feels that he has control of the evil and he has the power to manipulate the environment and people for his own ends. ‘Frankenstein’ centres on the creation of a monster made from parts of dead bodies and the fear created by the monster due to circumstance and the ignorance of society....   [tags: Shelley Stoker Frankenstein Dracula Essays] 1804 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood - Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood For more than 100 years, Bram Stoker’s Victorian novel, Dracula, has remained one of the most successful and revered novels ever published. Since its release in 1897, no other literary publication has been the subject of cinematic reproduction as much as Dracula. Dracula has involuntarily become the most media friendly personality of the 20th century. When a novel, such as Dracula, is transformed into a cinematic version, the end product is usually mediocre and provides non-existing justice to the pain staking work endured by the author....   [tags: Film Films Movie Movies]
:: 10 Works Cited
4246 words
(12.1 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Vlad Dracula: Origin of the Vampire by Bram Stoker - It has been nearly one hundred and seventeen years since Bram Stoker published his ground breaking novel entitled “Dracula” and only twenty-two years since the movie “Bram Stoker’s Dracula”, a film based upon the novel, was unleashed upon the world. The book and the movie were a success and influenced the creation of a genre that still is seen today in pop culture. Though many raved about the story, no one ever explored the source of this fantastical tale of blood shed. To understand where his inspiration took flight, one would have to look back five hundred and eighty-three years ago, when a notorious Romanian prince inflicted fear upon the masses....   [tags: blood lust, hunyadi, fasulo]
:: 4 Works Cited
1268 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula: A Variation of a Classic Work in Modern Time - ... 2014. Vlad III was born into a family of defenders, he lived, fought and believed he was born to defend the Order of the Dracul, as his father and brother did. Vlad II, was appointed by King Sigismund in 1431 and served as military governor for Transylvanian region of Wallachia. Seeking greater hierarchy, he began to gather support and in 1436, killed the Danesti prince Alexandru I and became Vlad II. Between the powers of the Ottoman Turks and the Hungarian Kingdom, in their reign were powerful and Vlad II was forced to pay tribute to the Sultan....   [tags: vampire movies, Coppola's version]
:: 4 Works Cited
1517 words
(4.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Bram Stoker’s Dracula - Bram Stoker’s Dracula Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a classic example of Gothic writing. Gothic writing was very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the early centuries, Gothic writing would frighten the audience and it was also used as a style of architecture. Dracula, which was first published in 1897, would definitely cause a shock as there was a supernatural being, roaming around sucking people’s blood by the neck. Gothic literature usually includes vampires, monsters or some type of ancient mystical creature....   [tags: English Literature] 2365 words
(6.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula and the Threat of Female Sexual Expression by Bram Stoker - The late nineteenth century Irish novelist, Bram Stoker is most famous for creating Dracula, one of the most popular and well-known vampire stories ever written. Dracula is a gothic, “horror novel about a vampire named Count Dracula who is looking to move from his native country of Transylvania to England” (Shmoop Editorial Team). Unbeknownst of Dracula’s plans, Jonathan Harker, a young English lawyer, traveled to Castle Dracula to help the count with his plans and talk to him about all his options....   [tags: vampire stories, horror novel]
:: 5 Works Cited
1398 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker's Dracula vs. Miyazaki's Princess Mononoke - Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula, as well as, Hayao Miyazaki’s animated feature, Princess Mononoke, deal with the prevalent theme of good verses evil. On the surface, both stories seem like typical hero verses villain tales, but once their plots are more closely analyzed it is evident that there is not a bold line between the two extremes. Both pieces explore the idea of evil being in the eye of the beholder and being interpreted completely differently from contrasting perspectives. Princess Mononoke is the tale of a young prince, Ashitaka, who battles a demon bore, only to become possessed with its evil spirit....   [tags: essays research papers] 831 words
(2.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Van Hesling's Character - The one book that started the vampire industry with a boom is the book Dracula written by Bram Stoker. Dracula had the most suspense and dread filled plot along with unique characters. Some characters stood out more than others, especially the foreigner Dr. Van Helsing. Van Helsing is a philosopher and metaphysician with many important roles in this novel. His characters personality, major actions/reactions, themes, and motivations demonstrated made him a useful and significant figure throughout the story....   [tags: Bram Stoker's Dracula] 994 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Good by Evil - Carol A. Senf uses a critical theory lens when she picks apart Bram Stoker’s Dracula. The majority of literary critics interpret this popular myth to be the opposition of good and evil, they turn a blind eye to the more specifically literary matters such as method of narration, characterization, and style. Carol Senf’s critical essay “Dracula: the Unseen Face in the Mirror” she believes that Stokers novel “revolves, not around the conquest of Evil by Good, but on the similarities between the two” (Senf 421)....   [tags: Bram Stoker, Dracula]
:: 1 Works Cited
1290 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Devils and Angels - Bram Stoker’s “Dracula,” came to print in 1897, at the height of Nineteenth century Victorian life in Europe, a progressively modern era that saw much medical and technological advancement. This era brought with it the contentious idea of an empowered woman, the “New Woman,” a woman who aspires to be educated as well as sexually and economically independent. Stoker gives contrasting views of this notion in “Dracula.” While the main characters, Lucy and Mina, are clearly opposite in personality, they are both portrayed as unequal, defenseless objects that are to be protected and desired....   [tags: Bram Stoker, Dracula] 945 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla: Bram Stoker’s Inspiration for Dracula - Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla: Bram Stoker’s Inspiration for Dracula “3 May. Bistritz. Left Munich at 8:35 p.m.” Abraham Stoker in this unassuming way begins his Gothic masterpiece, Dracula (The Annotated Dracula 1). Dracula has been called ‘imaginative’ and ‘original.’ , and Harry Ludlam calls it “the product of his own vivid imagination and imaginative research” (Senf 41). However, the originality of Stoker's Dracula is in doubt. By a similarity in the setting, characters and plot, in Bram Stoker’s Gothic work Dracula and the posthumously published short story “Dracula’s Guest,” Stoker is shown to have used Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s classic, Gothic, short story, “Carmilla”, as the b...   [tags: Dracula]
:: 8 Works Cited
1582 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
An Atmosphere of Fear and Horror in the Opening Chapter of Dracula by Bram Stoker - An Atmosphere of Fear and Horror in the Opening Chapter of Dracula by Bram Stoker The novel of Dracula is written by Bram Stoker It was written in the early 19th century and at this time there was much mystery and suspicion surrounding such places as Transylvania where the book is set. The book's form is that it's written as a journal by the main character, Jonathon Harker. The fact that it's written as a journal makes the whole book seem more believable, and it's as though he's actually writing his experiences as they're happening, and his thoughts and feelings make it seem more personal and seem more realistic....   [tags: Papers] 1871 words
(5.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Vampires Manifest Fear, Which Shapes How Society Responds to Vampires - Through an examination of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula and Jonathan Demme’s film Silence of the Lambs, there is an analysis into how the qualities of the vampire manifest fear and how this shapes the manner in which society responds to it. This is achieved through a feminist reading of the overt sexuality that accompanies the vampire coupled with a psychoanalytical reading of psychological acuity. Dracula and Silence of the lambs both evidently belong to the gothic horror genre because of their association with the disruption and transgression of both social and psychic limits within their societies....   [tags: Vampires, sociology, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Jonatha] 1700 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Film Dracula by Bran Stoker - Bram Stoker’s Dracula had no copyright license over reprints of Stoker’s original work. However, because Stoker’s widow had obtained copyright license over theatrical productions, at the time, that also included films. Therefore, while Nosferatu is a horror film based primarily off of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, directed by F.W. Murnau, it follows an almost identical plot with the exception of the characters’ names. Although eventually, Mrs. Stoker did win an infringement lawsuit against the makers of Nosferatu....   [tags: dark romanticism, silent film, Bram Stoker]
:: 3 Works Cited
1101 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dracula Seen in New Eyes - ... Senf goes on to argue in her essay, “Stoker uses Harker’s perplexity to establish his character as a very parochial Englishman whose apparent curiosity is not a desire for understanding, but a need to have his preconceptions confirmed” (Senf 426). Simply meaning that Harker sees what he wants to see, he sees what will prove the biases he had before he arrived in Transylvania. Senf argues that you do not know if Dracula is the antagonist or the victim in this crusade. There are many clues, which show to prove the many ways this novel can be interpreted as....   [tags: Bram Stoker novel analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
766 words
(2.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Role of Gender in Dracula - ... Holmwood is would be the ideal choice for Lucy despite her scandalous action in kissing Morris. Holmwood is a young and healthy lord and is rich enough to provide for her; yet also at the same time not have one flaw to his choice.“Although the women in the novel do betray some very questionable desires, it is important to emphasize that neither Mina nor Lucy is an example of the New Woman” (Pikula p.289). Due to the fact that Mina works as a schoolmistress before her wedding, learns shorthand and typing and has some journalistic aspirations, but she mainly acquires practical knowledge in order to “be useful to Jonathan” (Pikula p.289) she is not a vision of the New Woman....   [tags: Bram Stoker novel analysis] 1150 words
(3.3 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Dracula: The Contemporary Dissolution of His Purpose - ... Secondly, “the story of his race” is peculiar (33); Dracula speaks of the history as inclusive and presents his “blood” as greater than devils or witches (35). Thirdly, Dracula asks Harker to write letters, however Harker remarks that he “has no choice” (37), to his employer and loved ones first, to inform them he will remain with Dracula “until a month from now” (37), then to tell them he is safe and returning from Transylvania. During the first request of the letters, Dracula takes “no refusal” from Harker, supporting Harker’s fears of his imprisonment....   [tags: Bram Stoker's novel analysis]
:: 3 Works Cited
1449 words
(4.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Anti-Christian Values in Dracula - ... Christians believe no one but the Lord is in control of everlasting life. They believe that consuming the body and blood of Christ will give them everlasting life with God in Heaven, while Dracula is remaining alive by consuming the blood of the living. By this, Dracula is relying on humans to restore his life after death and not concentrating on God as the source of life. The transference of blood is a major avenue through which the taint of Dracula is spread. With a bite and this transferal of blood, he is able to feed....   [tags: Bram Stoker's novel, character anaysis] 767 words
(2.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Discourse in Dracula - No work of literature is ever written without consideration of the context of the time period of which it was constructed. Dracula, by Bram Stoker, and the film adaptation of the same text by Francis Coppola, differ greatly in attitudes, values and beliefs despite the fact that the film is based on the text. Furthermore, the added embellishments which no doubt make the film more pleasing to the viewer such as increased gore drown out the symbols of values and beliefs conveyed through the individual text....   [tags: Bram Stoker, Novel, Film, Analysis] 756 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Dracula - Symbolism Of Blood - In Bram Stoker's Dracula, the most blatant and powerful symbol is blood. He takes the blood that means so much to the believers of this legend and has it represent more than even they could imagine. Blood is the main object associated with vampires and vampirism. From a mythical standpoint, it is the basis of life for the vampires as they feed off of the blood of young, vibrant souls. From a more scientific standpoint blood is what would drip out of the corpse's mouth when family members would dig up their dead kin to check for the dreaded disease....   [tags: Bram Stoker] 1227 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Narrative Method of Dracula - The word ‘monster’ derives from the Latin words ‘monere’ and ‘monstrare’. ‘Monere’ means to warn against something, while ‘monstrare’ means to show something. If these two origins are put together, the word ‘monster’ obtains the meaning of something that is shown to warn. In relation to Dracula, this would allow a whole series of question from what makes Dracula a monster to what does he warn the reader against. In this essay I will mainly deal with the question of what makes Dracula a monster; however I will bear other questions in mind such as why Dracula is seen as a monster by the crew of light....   [tags: monster, Dr Seward, Bram Stoker, etymology]
:: 3 Works Cited
1284 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Life and Literary Achievements of Bram Stoker - One of the greatest horror stories of all time, Dracula, has changed many different people’s lives, including the life of the man who wrote it. The places that Bram Stoker has visited and experiences the he has gone through can be seen in Dracula as well as in several of his other novels. His experiences have led to a novel that is still widely read and has inspired other author’s works. All of this success from a man who was not expected to live long. Abraham (Bram) Stoker was born on November 24, 1847 in Clontarf as a premature....   [tags: biography, dracula, writers]
:: 1 Works Cited
1633 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Abraham Bram Stoker: A Brief Biography - ... The Constitution of Atlanta explained: “..Speaking of his rather-striking name, he said: “I was named Abraham Stoker, but since my very young childhood, I have been called Bram-and Bram, I have let it remain””. In 1876, he meets a famous English actor, Sir Henry Irving, after his review of “Hamlet” in which Irving was cast. They soon became friends, and this relationship would soon prove to be a firm ground to his career. It didn’t take long for Irving to offer Bram a management position at Lyceum Theatre, where he would write letters for him and accompany him on his worldwide tours....   [tags: Dracula, The Mystery of the Sea, The Man]
:: 1 Works Cited
695 words
(2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Sex and Sexuality in Dracula - Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, published in 1897, explores various sexual erotic possibilities in the vampire's embrace, as discussed by Leonard Wolf. The novel confronts Victorian fears of homosexuality; that were current at the time due to the trial of playwright Oscar Wilde. The vampire's embrace could also be interpreted as an illustration of Victorian fears of the changing role of women. Therefore it is important to consider: the historical context of the novel; the Victorian notion of the `New Woman' specifically the character of Lucy Westenra; the inversion of gender roles; notions of sexuality; and the emasculation of men, by lessening their power over women; in the novel Dracula....   [tags: European Literature Bram Stoker]
:: 18 Works Cited
2487 words
(7.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Women in Dracula - The Women of Dracula Throughout the book Dracula, the author, Bram Stoker, portrays many different aspects of women's roles in the 19th century. Since this novel was published many films have been created based on Stoker's story line. Nosferatu, a silent film, depicts the women of the story, other than Mina, as minimal characters. The movie Dracula, filmed in the 1930's, stays very true to the novel, with only minor changes to the characters and plot. All three of the works depict the same women differently, thus changing the complete literary artistic nature of each piece....   [tags: European Literature Bram Stoker Vampires]
:: 4 Works Cited
1233 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bram Stoker - Bram Stoker Bram Stoker unleashed his horrific creation on an unsuspecting world over one hundred years ago. One could hardly imagine that his creature of the night would delight and inhabit the nightmares of every generation between his and ours. Count Dracula has become an icon of evil, and is perhaps the most widely recognized bogeyman in all of world literature. To date, there have been over one hundred films made about Dracula or other assorted vampires, not to mention countless novels, comic books, nonfiction works, toys, clubs and societies—even a children’s breakfast cereal celebrating the myth of the undead count....   [tags: Biography Dracula Biographies Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1462 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dracula - Dracula Author: Bram Stoker (1847-1912), a fan and friend of the playwright Henry Irving, he wrote dramatic criticism and glowing reviews of Irving's work for the local papers and finally became business manager of Henry Irving's Lyceum Theatre. During these years he wrote his greatest novel, Dracula. Stoker wrote numerous novels, short stories, essays, and lectures, but Dracula is by far his most famous work and perhaps the most well known horror novel. Summery: Jonathan Harker, a young English solicitor, is sent to the Eastern European country of Transylvania to conclude a real estate transaction with Count Dracula....   [tags: Bram Stoker] 1655 words
(4.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dracula: A Simple Tale of Good vs. Evil - Batman beats the Joker. Spiderman banishes the Green Goblin. For centuries story tellers have used the basic idea of good beats bad to guide their tales. Stories of blood sucking, human possessions and other tales have been passed down generations and vary between cultures. Among the creators of the famous protagonists is, Bram Stoker, the creator of Dracula. This fictional character was soon to be famous, and modified for years to come into movie characters or even into cereal commercials. But the original will never be forgotten; a story of a group of friends all with the same mission, to destroy Dracula....   [tags: dracula] 1486 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Braham Stoker's Dracula and The Distrust Between the Sexes - Dracula and The Distrust Between the Sexes     "Unpleasant experiences with the opposite sex seem to be unavoidable" (Horney 342). This quote from Karen Horney's essay The Distrust Between the Sexes seems to be discussing Dracula. Though her essay, (a lecture originally given to the German's Women Medical Association in November 1930), does not mention Dracula directly, the points that she argued can be transposed onto Bram Stoker's Dracula. In her essay, Horney asserts that men are very concerned with self-preservation, and also that men have an innate fear of women in power positions and therefore do what they can to prevent women from obtaining "power positions,"; these two points are...   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
777 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Money - The True Force Behind Braham Stoker's Dracula - Money - The True Force Behind Dracula      In Dracula (1897), Bram Stoker explores the "wonderful power of money" (Stoker 341). Through the actions of Van Helsing and the "Army of Light" Stoker ponders "What can it not do when it is properly applied; and what it might do when basely used!" (341) through Dracula's machinations. Though one does not usually associate a vampire with a bank statement, Dracula utilizes the power of money as well as his abilities to turn into dust and bats. By granting Dracula the same influence of the "blessed buck" that the Army of Light uses to acquire information, Stoker augments the Count's threat to British society and allows him to function as not...   [tags: Dracula Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
815 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Victorian Sexuality in Stoker’s Dracula, LeFanu’s Carmilla, and Polidori’s Vampyre - Victorian Sexuality in Stoker’s Dracula, LeFanu’s Carmilla, and Polidori’s Vampyre Literature is representative of the time in which it is produced. Literature can reflect societal views, attitudes, and fears.Vampire literature, in particular, often represents the fears of a society.In the Victorian Era, a time of intense sexual repression, it was common for vampire stories to reflect the fear of sexuality that was rampant in society. Bram Stoker’s Dracula illustrated fears about sexual women in contrast to the woman who respected and abided by society’s sexual norms....   [tags: Dracula]
:: 3 Works Cited
1689 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Stoker's Portrayal of Women in "Dracula" - Similar to almost every piece of literature ever created, Dracula by Bram Stoker has been interpreted many different ways, being torn at from every angle possible. Just as one might find interest in interpreting novels differently, he or she might also find interest in the plot, prose, or theme, all of which ultimately lead to the novels overall tone. Throughout the novel, it becomes blatant that the novel contains an underlying theme of female incompetence and inferiority. Through a true feminist’s eyes, this analysis can clearly be understood by highlighting the actions of Mina and Lucy, the obvious inferior females in the book....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1196 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Bram Stoker Dracula"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>