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Biological Weapons Convention Treaty - The Biological Weapons Convention treaty also known as the Biological and Weapons Toxin Convention was established in 1972. This treaty was created in the efforts to stop the production of Biological weapons and the use of it in combat. As well as banning the use of its delivery systems and storage facilities. In 1972 over 158 countries came to an agreement and signed the Biological Weapons Convention treaty. Although the treaty was signed in 1972 it did not take effect until 1975. This treaty only affected the countries who actually signed it....   [tags: biological warfare, toxins]
:: 3 Works Cited
893 words
(2.6 pages)
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Effects of Biological and Chemical Warfare - “The gas instantly caused severe burning in their throats and lung. The men clutched their chests, coughed, and gasped for breath. Attempts to shield themselves from the gas were largely futile. Many tried to burrow their noses and mouths or to cover them with cloth, but the moist, dense poison penetrated everything” (Taylor 17). Those were the effects of chlorine quoted by an eyewitness. The gases and biological agents used against people in war are very cruel. They cause lots of deaths in short periods of time, leaving lasting effects wherever they are unleashed....   [tags: Biological Weapon, Viral and Bacteria Pathogens] 2397 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Biological Integrated Detection System - The Biological Integrated Detection System The Biological Integrated Detection System is a United States Army asset that provides the ability to alert, detect, analyze, identify and report the presence of biological agents on the battlefield. In today’s world of ever expanding and uncertain chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) threats, it is more important than ever to understand the availability of tools used to protect the populace. In the United States of America, the citizenry is fortunate to have the United States Army as a front line resource that maintains elements within its organization to guard against these threats....   [tags: US army, battlefield, biological threats]
:: 3 Works Cited
1072 words
(3.1 pages)
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Biological Weapons: A Cheap and Effective Threat - Biological weapons hold a terrifying reputation. Because of this, one might hope that in fact, the weapons are ineffective and aren’t a serious threat. Unfortunately, this notion is completely flawed. The troubling truth is that biological weapons are very effective and can be easily obtained or made by opposing countries or terrorists. If you are thinking otherwise, consider this quote: “Myths to the contrary, the biological warfare and bioterrorist threats are real and require the full commitment of the United States and its allies to have a well-funded biodefense effort to produce an effective defense (Davis).” Not only is bio-warfare a threat, it is so serious that full commitment of the...   [tags: Biological, Chemical, and Nuclear]
:: 11 Works Cited
2019 words
(5.8 pages)
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Biological Integrated Detection Systems - There are many countries that are believed to have established programs in offense to biological warfare. Some of the distinguished countries include: Syria, Russia, China, Iran, Israel, Egypt, and North Korea. The easiest way to begin explaining Biological warfare is to consider any living organism and its possible potential to be used as a way of causing harm, injury, and even death to any population of people (Hooker, 2014). Organisms may consist of bacteria, fungi, or viruses. There are also toxins that may be found in any natural environment that have the potential to be used as a biological attack on any one person or population....   [tags: biological warfare, Syria, Russia, Egypt]
:: 5 Works Cited
913 words
(2.6 pages)
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Use of Typhoid as a Biological Terrorism Weapon - Introduction Salmonella typhoid bacteria have over 100 strains in the world today. Most cause illness in humans, but only a few of those strains cause the illness Typhoid Fever (Pike, 2014). Typhoid is a bacterium that has been very devastating to the human race for centuries. Typhoid thrives in undeveloped countries and countries with high populations and poor sanitation procedures. But, it is still a relevant disease here in the United States because of its ease of spread once someone is infected (Pollack, 2003)....   [tags: Biological Terrorism Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
1257 words
(3.6 pages)
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Soviet Union Biological Substance Preparation - The Soviet Union’s Biological Substance Preparation program also known as Biopreparat was created in 1973; the main idea was to establish an entity that would not leave any “footprints” of biological weapons activity in the Soviet Union. This was needed since the Soviet Union had signed the Biological Weapons Convention in 1972, which banned the mass production, and used of biological weapons. So to avoid drawing any attention to the link between the Bioperparat and the 15th Directorate, communication only occurred at the headquarters level with no direct contact....   [tags: biopreparat, biological weapons, tartar army]
:: 3 Works Cited
1033 words
(3 pages)
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Biological Processes and Catalysts for the Process of Nitrogen Fixation - Nitrogen is one the most inert chemicals after the noble gases, which makes it a great environment for the performance of limited chemical reactions.8,9,14,15 There is no surprise that nitrogen is a great choice because of its high dissociation energy, high ionization energy, and the inability to access its highest vacant molecular orbitals.15 Molecular dinitrogen is a tightly wound nonpolar molecule in character with σ and π electrons.14 The inertness of molecular dinitrogen makes practicable activation a challenge for chemists, but nature can do this process easily.10,14 Nitrogen is not only an important element in the area scientific research, but biological processes also have a muc...   [tags: nitrogren, biological systems, dinitrogen]
:: 19 Works Cited
1350 words
(3.9 pages)
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Interactions within Biological Systems Lead to Complex Properties - ... They can be found floating freely in the cytoplasm or bound to the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The ribosomes within the cytoplasm create proteins that are meant to stay inside the cell. The ribosomes on the rough endoplasmic reticulum create proteins that are meant to be secreted outside the cell. The ribosomes also vary by size, in eukaryotes they are larger (80s) and in prokaryotic cells they are smaller (70s). The ribosomes synthesize polypeptide chains that later form into full proteins as discussed in the earlier sections....   [tags: subcomponents of biological molecules] 3046 words
(8.7 pages)
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DNA: One of the Biological Macromolecules that Contain Knots - Summary In the article “One- pot pentaknot,” published by Advance Online Publishers and submitted to the Nature Chemistry Journal in November, 2011, Ayme Et. Al., (2011) describes DNA as one of the biological macromolecules that contain knots. The report states that knots are also found in proteins and are important structural components of deoxyribonucleic acids. Similarly, the report, “New Motifs in DNA nanotechnology” by Seeman et al, (1998) outlines the importance of knots in DNA and the ability of various types of DNA to form knots....   [tags: biological information, phenotype]
:: 3 Works Cited
889 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Dangers of Military Biological Testing -     Abstract: Across the United States for the past half a century, the Department of Defense and the U.S. Army have been releasing biological agents over the very population they are supposed to protect. Although few Americans know it, open-air biological testing of stimulants such as aspergillus fumigatus, zinc cadmium sulfide, bacillus subtilis, and serratia marcescens has been taking place over populated areas since at least 1949. Between 1949 and 1969, the military admits to having conducted 239 open-air tests over populated areas in the United States....   [tags: Biological Testing Essays]
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1731 words
(4.9 pages)
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Explaining Why Biological Warfare Cannot be Explained with the SCOT Theory, Actor-Network Theory and Technological Systems Theory - The purpose of this essay is to explain why it will be a problem to explain biological warfare with the SCOT theory, actor-network theory and technological systems theory. Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) is a theory that was introduced by Weiber Bijker that explains the link between social and technical processes of a technology or artifact. Bjiker argued that technology is shaped by human engineers, market forces, consumer’s needs and demands. In SCOT, technology is a social construction....   [tags: biological warfare]
:: 5 Works Cited
619 words
(1.8 pages)
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Biological Basis Of Behavior - Biological Basis Of Behavior Primary Behaviors of Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is defined as a "devastating psychotic disorder that may involve characteristic disturbances in thinking (delusions), perception (hallucinations), speech, emotions, and behavior (Durand and Barlow 443). This disorder affects nearly 2.5 million people. The symptoms of schizophrenia are usually divided into two categories, positive and negative. The positive symptoms include delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech or thinking, grossly disorganized behavior, and catatonic behaviors, which means that you suffer from motor immobility (schizophrenia.com)....   [tags: Science Biology Biological Essays]
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1583 words
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The Threats of Biological Warfare - The term “biological warfare” has been used quite frequently lately. We see it on the news, read it in magazines and newspapers, and hear about it in the political rhetoric of the day. However, the sad reality is that most Americans are not well informed about how dangerous the threat of biological warfare really is. Not only that, but our own government is not even prepared to deal with a biological attack, something that is more probable than most of us would like to believe. Biological warfare is not all that complicated....   [tags: Biological Warfare War Weapons Essays] 2318 words
(6.6 pages)
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Biological Warfare: Testing and Researching Toxins - Biological Warfare: Testing and Researching Toxins Biological Warfare is the use and employment of biological agents to harm or kill humans, animals, or plant life. Bio warfare can cause a significant amount of casualties with less preparation and work then other types of attacks. The weapons are relatively cheap and, unlike explosive attacks, biological attacks can be used to kill a select group. This meaning a biological agent can be created that would, for example only target animals or only target humans....   [tags: Biological Warfare Research Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
2817 words
(8 pages)
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The Funding of Making Chemical and Biological Weapons - The Funding of Making Chemical and Biological Weapons Will the human race still be in existence in fifty more years. Although likely, there is a very real possibility that we will not be here. For example, after the Gulf War, we found Saddam Hussein stockpiling Weapons of Mass Destruction. Did you know that he had enough weapons to kill every single human, dog, and cow on the face of the earth. When I found that out, I thought it was very interesting, so I decided to do a report on it. If you keep reading, you’ll find out what I’ve found out....   [tags: Chemical Biological Weapons War Essays] 4399 words
(12.6 pages)
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Chemical and Biological Weaponry - Chemical and Biological Weaponry Introduction: A Modern Day Trojan Horse Although the envelope resembled a letter from a fourth grade student, the contents addressed to Senator Tom Daschle were life threatening. Laced within the envelope was a form of the bacteria known as Bacillus Anthracis, bacteria more commonly known as anthrax. When exposed to humans, an anthrax infection leads to the release of toxins, which if not properly treated are fatal (cnn.com). Around the same time of Senator Daschle’s threat, other cases of anthrax exposure were publicized....   [tags: Biological Warfare Nuclear Weapons Ethics Essays]
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1329 words
(3.8 pages)
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Five Biological Killers that May be Used for Terrorism -     Advanced technology affords many benefits to human beings, but it also provides instruments of mass destruction. For example, advanced biological technology may provide cures for illnesses but it also provides instruments of biological terrorism. When war involves these microscopic, deadly, biological agents, it takes on a new and frightening dimension. Human beings harnessing the power of bacteria to kill large quantities of people sounds like science fiction. Unfortunately, we now hear about use of these biological agents not only from novels, but also from the newspaper....   [tags: Biological Weapons Essays]
:: 8 Works Cited
2812 words
(8 pages)
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Options for Biological Terrorism Attacks and Epidemiological Responses -        Bioterrorism is not a distant threat that may concern us twenty years from now.  It has occurred throughout history and continues to this day.  As recently as 1996, a man from Ohio with connections to an extremist group was able to obtain Bubonic Plague cultures through the US Postal Service (Danzig & Berkowsky, 1997).  In the last month, several people within the United States have become infected with anthrax.  As we stand right now, America is unprepared for a large-scale attack with biological weapons, and as we continue with our "War on Terrorism," the likelihood of such an attack is increasing every day.  Terrorists can use three major methods to most effectively distribute a...   [tags: Biological Weapons Essays]
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2933 words
(8.4 pages)
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Particle Kinetics of Biological Aerosols During Impaction - At the beginning of the 20th century, the study of aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas, were the forefront of physical science because they represented the smallest observable division of matter. In fact, aerosols contributed to the early understanding of Brownian motion and diffusion, Millikan's measurement of electron charge, and Wilson's cloud chamber experiment for the study of ionizing radiation. During the first half of the century, aerosol research continued, and grew important after World War II and especially during the 1970s and 1980s, during which environmental awareness and a concern for health effects arising from air pollution in community and occupation...   [tags: physics biological aerosol] 1614 words
(4.6 pages)
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Cryobiology: Low Temperature Studies Of Biological Systems - Cryobiology: Low Temperature Studies Of Biological Systems Thesis: Low temperature biology, or cryobiology, has the possibility, and may very easily and very drastically affect everyones' lives in the future. Through rapidly approaching cryobiological medical procedures and techniques, the presence of intense ethical issues may play an important role in many everyday decisions that do not now exist. Introduction What is cryobiology. It is "the study of the effects of freezing and low temperatures on living organisms" (Read, 1999)....   [tags: Biology Biological Papers]
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4929 words
(14.1 pages)
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Bioligical is the Science Related to Biological Organisms - ... Buchner's work made that concoction changes in living cells happened by movement of chemicals and that these methodologies could be analyzed and saw by disconnecting and portraying proteins. This generated another stage in biochemical exploration: the separation and physico-substance characterization of catalysts. This exploration proceeds today yet helped by the systems of sub-atomic science and recombinant DNA engineering and it has stretched to incorporate different macromolecules found in cells....   [tags: chemical, life processes, heredity] 1286 words
(3.7 pages)
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Bioinformatics - Solving Biological Problems Using DNA and Amino Acid Sequences - Bioinformatics - Solving Biological Problems Using DNA and Amino Acid Sequences 1. Introduction In the wake of Genomic revolution, biology that used to be a lab-based science has transformed to embrace Information science. Human Genome Project is a 13-year project focusing on identifying approximately 30,000 genes in human DNA. The information found is stored in databases, analyzed and used for different purposes like simplifying diagnosis of disease, earlier detection of genetic predisposition to specific disease, custom drugs, gene therapy, gene replacement technologies [1]....   [tags: Science Biology Biological Papers]
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3063 words
(8.8 pages)
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Biological Weapons and Biological Warfare - Biological Weapons and Biological Warfare Thesis: Biological Warfare is morally and inhumanely wrong, It is the wrongful killing of men, women, and children. It should be stopped no matter what the circumstances are. I. Introduction into the bad effects of biological warfare through some examples. a. Example of single affect of biological warfare b. Example of a country using Biological Warfare II. Definition of Biological Warfare a. Biological Warfare Agents i. Micro-Organisms ii. Toxins b....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive] 1477 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Biological and Psychoanalytical Perspectives in Psychology - In this essay the author will throughout compare the biological and psychoanalytical key features and core assumptions in psychology and show in what ways they are similar for example both being deterministic in there key features and core assumptions also how they differ for example the way they treat individuals with the same disorder differently. The biological perspective core assumptions suggest our nervous system performs functions like our behaviour, experiences and movements (Carlson 2010)....   [tags: Sigmund Freud, behaviour, body, mind]
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1585 words
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Warfare: An Invention or a Biological Necessity? - ... However, Shaw and Yuwa do not take into account the fact that human mind is more complex and developed than other animals minds, especially considering morality and creativity. Unlike animals, man is able to choose whether or not to resort to violent means to reach their objectives. We as humans have the option of diplomacy while animals do not. An additional and prominent argument in this nature vs nurture debate relating to the biological foundations of violence is genetics. They argue that it is man’s genes that make aggression and violence inevitable....   [tags: theories on human aggressiveness] 785 words
(2.2 pages)
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Biological and Psychoanalytic Perspectives in Psychology - The psychoanalytic perspective grew out of subsequent psychoanalytic theories (1901, 1924, and 1940) following decades of interactions with clients with the use of an innovative procedure developed by Sigmund Freud that required lengthy verbal interactions with patients during which Freud probed deep into their lives. In a nutshell, the psychoanalytic perspective looked to explain personality, motivation, and psychological disorders by focussing on the influence of early childhood experiences, on unconscious motives and conflicts, and on the methods people use to cope with their sexual and aggressive urges....   [tags: Psychology]
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1625 words
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The Biological and Sociological Explanations of Crime - ... From his findings, he concluded that typically criminals appeared to look physically different to the soldiers; such as they tended to have more wrinkled skin, long arms, fuller lips, facial asymmetry, large ears and an unusually shaped/sized head. Lombroso also stated that if a male had more than five of these attributes then they would fit the description of being a ‘born criminal’; 43% of the criminals that Lombroso examined had 5 of the physical attributes. However, he also suggested that it was only necessary for females to match the description of three of these characteristics to be classed as a ‘born criminal’....   [tags: chromosome’ theory, psychoanalytic, stereotype] 1310 words
(3.7 pages)
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Taking a Look at Biological Criminology - ... But the statistics only indicate that IQ explains 1.5% of the variance in self-reported crime. (Biosocial and Psychological Theories, Feb. 11, 2014) The prediction of incarceration on future behavior is simple; it has none. Early biological theory claims that criminals are born, therefore any attempt at changing them through incarceration will not be successful. They are predetermined defects. But the crucial element is the new evolutionary perspective we see today that incorporates a sociological aspect....   [tags: science applied to crime solving] 1229 words
(3.5 pages)
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Is Crime a Biological or Learned Behavior? - There has always been a fascination with trying to determine what causes an individual to become a criminal. Of course a large part of that fascination has to do with the want to reduce crime, and to determine if there is a way to detect and prevent individuals from committing crime. Determining what causes criminality is still not perfectly clear and likewise, there is still debate as to whether crime is caused biologically, environmentally, or socially. Furthermore, the debate is directly correlated to the notion of 'nurture vs nature'....   [tags: Crime]
:: 4 Works Cited
1281 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Working of a Biological Catalyst: Catalase - ... Enzyme activity was not affected as the pH of water, which is 7, is similar to the pH the liver maintains. In tube 5 a boiled cube of liver was placed into hydrogen peroxide. Boiling liver made irreversible changes to the structure of catalase and it could no longer function properly, it become denatured. Boiling liver damaged the catalase enzyme and clearly decreased the amount of bubbles when it was exposed to hydrogen peroxide; no foam was created. In tube 2 manganese dioxide and a cube of liver was added to hydrogen peroxide....   [tags: enzyme, pH, broiling liver] 859 words
(2.5 pages)
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Strengths and Weaknesses of Biological Positivism - Biological Positivism has both its strengths and weaknesses, it changed the way of criminological ideas and opened up new theories that were based on scientific facts rather than philosophical ideas like in Classicism. It also highlighted the importance of looking into peoples genetic make-up as research such as Brunners' research into the extra 'Y' chromosome which led to the idea that genetic defects in a family can cause abnormal behaviours and also the Twin and Adoptions studies that showed a correlation between genetics and crime....   [tags: Criminology, Behaviors, Theories]
:: 10 Works Cited
2095 words
(6 pages)
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Dangerous type of Biological Weapon - 1. Introduction Anthrax is one of the many biological weapons that cause the world to panic. Biological weapons can be described as a weapon that are using material such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, toxin, or other biological agents that can be utilized against human, plants, or animals (Schneider, 2014). Biological weapons have already been used during ancient times. Tossing rotting animals into heavy fortified town to slowly killing the people inside the town, or poisoned the source of water has already been a military strategy long time ago....   [tags: Viruses, Bacteria, Fungi, Toxins, Anthrax, Humans]
:: 8 Works Cited
1316 words
(3.8 pages)
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Ruse on a Biological Foundation for Ethics - Michael Ruse argues that "The Biological Sciences Can Act as a Ground for Ethics." (p.297) He begins with a distinction between the normative and the meta-ethical, and then sets out to lay the foundations for normative ethics as a biologically driven adaptive function. He then moves on to justifying why we ought to behave as biology influences us to do, where he runs into a problem. People feel certain ways about what is right and what is wrong, Ruse begins, and these feelings are what become the moral maxims we follow (p299)....   [tags: philosophy, right, wrong]
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1367 words
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History of Chemical and Biological Warfare - Society today has been the witness to the use of chemical weapons upon various groups of people. A prime example is the use of poison gas in Syria.( http://fair.org/take-action/action-alerts/iraq-then-syria-now) Chemical weapons were made by chemist to do great harm. Typically, a chemical weapon is defined by chemist as any toxic chemical or its precursor that can cause death, injury, temporary incapacitation or sensory irritation through its chemical action. Because of the destruction caused by the use of chemical weapons, society has tried to place controls on their use with the development....   [tags: weapons of mass destruction] 1249 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Mind: Biological and Mental Functions - The biological and mental functions that are present in the body process the information that is given, and the mind is the mediator of the information that is processed through these biological and mental functions. It constructs an interpretation of the sensory input that is received by both functions. The information that is received by the brain is further interpreted by the mind and it constructs a unique reality from the basic information. The mind as the mediator can be seen in topics such as categorization and bias in social realities, but also in the language and thought of both humans and non-human animals....   [tags: information, sensory, input, mediator] 935 words
(2.7 pages)
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Anthrax: A Deadly Biological Weapon - Biological weapons are a widely used source of terror. The definition of a biological weapon is a harmful biological agent (as a pathogenic microorganism or a neurotoxin) used as a weapon to cause death or disease usually on a large scale (“Biological Weapon,” The Merriam- Webster Dictionary). There are numerous substances used as biological weapons. Some include Glanders, Botulism, and Brucellosis. Biological weapons consist of a kind of substance or disease that is used to launch an attack on a large population of people....   [tags: Warfare]
:: 8 Works Cited
1616 words
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Mechanisms for the Regulation of Biological Processes - ... Illustration of prominent observations and technical advancements in the field of protein allostery. Development of major concepts is depicted on the diagonal. pathway. Intriguingly, the substrate, or the product of the inhibited enzyme is structurally different from the inhibitor. For example, while aspartate transcarbamlyase (ATCase) uses aspartate and carbamyl phosphate to generate N-carbamyl-L-aspartate and inorganic phosphate (Pi), it is inhibited by the structurally different cytidine triphosphate (CTP) (34, 35)....   [tags: protiens, allosteric, entropy] 3184 words
(9.1 pages)
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From Botulism to a Biological Weapon - The disease causing organism Clostridium botulinum, was once extracted for its botulism toxin as a biological weapon by several nations including the United States, the former Soviet Union and Japan in the 1930s due to the toxin’s high morbidity and mortality rate (Arnon et al., 2001). This gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium can be found in the natural environment (i.e. soil) and in improperly processed canned foods due to the bacterium’s alkaline and anaerobic preference, which allows the spores to germinate....   [tags: clostridium botulinum] 906 words
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Biological Rhythm of Sleeping and Narcolepsy - Throughout the day, our bodies fluctuate and our brains follow. Our bodies have learned to work along with the twenty-four hour cycle of the day through the use of an internal clock called the circadian rhythm. As consciousness fades, different parts of our brain stop communicating with one another. The sleeping brain has its own biological rhythm. Approximately ever ninety minutes, we cycle through four sleep stages, NREM 1, NREM 2, NREM 3, and REM sleep. Biology and the environment interact with our sleep patterns causing sleep deprivation and sleeping disorders....   [tags: sleep paterns, internal clock] 580 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Biological Level of Analysis - Discuss how and why particular research methods are used at the biological level of analysis The biological level of analysis argues that there are physiological origins of many behaviours, and that human beings should be studied as biological systems. This is not to say that behaviour is not the result of biological systems alone, but that we should also consider how the environment and cognition may interact with biological systems and affect physiology. This relationship is biderectional i.e....   [tags: physiological origin of behavior]
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3270 words
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Quality Assurance for Biological Products - ... If anything were to go wrong in the production and manufacturing of a vaccine, the ones responsible would be the manufacturers, NCA and each individual member states. The NCA is responsible for licensing and approving a manufacturing establishment for production of biological products only if the manufacturer complies with the principles of good manufacturing practice (GMP). The manufacturers are responsible for following GMP. The individual member states are responsible for having written standards, both general and product-specific, for biological products available for use in their countries....   [tags: new vaccine process]
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1715 words
(4.9 pages)
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Biological, Nuclear and Radiological Attacks - In the year’s ahead, chemical, biological, nuclear and radiological attacks will grow higher as terrorist’s and anarchist’s weapons become more scientifically and technologically advanced. So, we need CBNR’s to answer the call and defend our country from dangerous chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Radiological weapon systems. Chemical engineering and chemistry is the backbone to the Chemical, Biological, Nuclear, Radiological (CBNR) Officer’s lifestyle. A CBNR Officer is a Career in the United States Army which helps defend against weapons of Mass Destruction and leads chemical platoons to deal with domestic chemical threats....   [tags: warfare, terrorist, anarchism]
:: 4 Works Cited
1114 words
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Race: Social Categorization, Not Biological - The English term ‘race’ is believed to originate from the Spanish word raza, which means ‘breed’ or ‘stock’ (Race). People use race to define other groups, this separation of groups is based largely on physical features. Features like skin color and hair don’t affect the fundamental biology of human variation (Hotz). Race is truly only skin deep, there are no true biological separations between two ‘racial’ groups. Scientifically speaking, there is more variation between single local groups than there is between two large, global groups; the human variation is constantly altering (Lewontin)....   [tags: racial groups, race, stereotypes]
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1442 words
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Biological Signs of a Killer - A person does not need to have acquired a doctorate in psychology to determine that there is something horrifically different about serial killers. Quotes from killers show this drastic difference, such as Ted Bundy who said, “What’s one less person on the face of the earth anyway?” (Scott 2). Or Charles Manson who, with seven simple words, disgusted and oppositely inspired millions by saying, “Death is the greatest form of love” (“Charles Manson”). It is inside these people where it is easy to be determined just how unstable the very fabrics of their genetic and brain codes are; many things can be genetically transmitted from parent to offspring through heredity; therefore, so can the biolo...   [tags: genetic, brain, nature]
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749 words
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Biological Diversity in Mangrove Forests - ... These fish are mainly sail fin molly, least killifish, and mosquito fish. The level above the smaller fish level of the mangrove food chain is the top level which is the mangrove birds. For example, egrets and ospreys are wading birds that feed on the community of fish that live between the roots of mangrove. However, there are other types of mangrove ecosystem birds, such as tricolored heron, white crowned pigeon, and brown pelican. Background: The ocean support diverse complex ecosystem arranging from the engineering coral reef to the oldest and most resilient forest on the plant, the mangroves (protector of our coast lines)....   [tags: habitat, food chain] 586 words
(1.7 pages)
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Human Fears of Biological Science - Biology, genetic engineering, research, humans and animals all have one thing in common; they all will potentially start the spread of the worst viral disease known to humanity. AIDS, a viral disease of the human, is spreading rapidly across the world. Also, parasites, rabies, and toxoplasma gondii are all potential factors in the human body takeover. Zombie films today help show how the world will be when this happens. Blood, saliva, and biting will all be known as curse words to society. Society in one’s eyes will never be the same....   [tags: Health]
:: 5 Works Cited
2000 words
(5.7 pages)
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Biological Aspect of Early Childhood - The transitional life span following toddlerhood is early childhood. Early childhood begins at the age of 4 years old to 6 years old. During the early childhood stage young children become very physically active, their language become more complex, and the evolution of imaginative and elaborate nature of play occurs. Young children at the early childhood stage also begin preschool. According to Piaget, a child at the early childhood begins to have more of an abstract and logical way of thinking....   [tags: Child Development ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1633 words
(4.7 pages)
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Biological Factors involved in Stress - Psychological and physical well-being and the overall quality of life are under a constant threat of stress and thus, psychological and medical sciences have long been concerned with studying stress response. Cox (1979) claimed that because of the poor understanding and defining it, the concept of stress tends to be rather elusive. The term, “stress”, commonly describes any physchological or physical alteration that deranges the organism’s homeostasis (or balance). This essay reviews some of the biological factors involved in stress and it has been organized in the following way....   [tags: Psychologyy]
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1603 words
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Biological Effects of Artificial Sweeteners - ... Second, we have aspartame. Aspartame is the blue little packet that we all know as Equal. The molecular formula of aspartame is C14H18N2O5. Aspartame was discovered in 1965 by a chemist named James Schlatter at John Hopkins by licking his fingers while working on an anti-ulcer drug. Aspartame is 180 times sweeter than regular sugar, which triggers our taste buds the moment it hits them. Aspartame is known to be in energy drinks, regular drinks, snacks, and yogurt. The components of aspartame occur naturally in foods, but aspartame it self must be manufactured through a process of fermentation and synthesis....   [tags: preventing obesity, America's sweet toth]
:: 5 Works Cited
604 words
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What is Biological Warfare? - During the past century, more than 500 million people have died due to infectious diseases. Several tens of thousands of these deaths were due to the deliberate release of pathogens or toxins. Two international treaties outlawed biological weapons in 1925 and 1972. Unfortunately, these treaties have failed to stop countries from conducting offensive weapons research and large-scale production of biological weapons. As our knowledge increases on these disease-causing agents, so does our fear of future threats of biological warfare (Frischknecht, 2003)....   [tags: global issues, infectious diseases]
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Biological and Chemical Weapons - Biological & Chemical Weapons Chaos, fear, and death. Those three words are what most people’s first thoughts are when they see the destructive offspring of either Biological or Chemical Weapons. These Weapons of Mass Destruction (also known as WMD’s) are actually considered the deadliest weapons of all time to not only humans but also to other animals, and plants. Biological and Chemical Warfare has become a major threat not only to the safety to the people of America, but also on the frontlines across the world but, that in order to fix these that the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention and Chemical Weapons Convention could do is to make mandatory background checks for anyone who buy...   [tags: fear, destruction, chaos] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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Biological Warfare In Korea - Whether the United States used Biological warfare in Korea has been a major topic for years. North Korea and China insist that Biological warfare was used against them during the Korean War in 1950- 1953, and the United States government strongly denies these allegations. North Korea and China both believe that the United States government was getting frustrated with the way the war was going because they were having a tough time defeating North Korea and China. President Truman who was president at that time did not want to lose the Korean War and wanted to win by any means necessary....   [tags: war, weapon of mass destruction]
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Chemical and Biological Warfare - The Role it Played Chemical and Biological Warfare In order to understand Project Coast you must first learn what Project Coast was all about. In the early 1981 the Chemical and Biological Warfare program, code named Coast, officially started and was finished in 1995(Folb & Gould, 2002). In my research paper I will discuss the history of Project Coast and I will let the reader understand the circumstances that surrounded Project Coast. I will also explain the different types of chemical agents that where and why they were used....   [tags: Coast, Racial War, Johannesburg, Africa]
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1011 words
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Biological Weapons Development Programs - Following the wide spread use of chemical weaponry, the Geneva Convention took place in 1925 to set forth the rules of war. One of the regulations was the discontinued use of chemical and biological warfare. Unfortunately, many countries would violate this document in order to gain an advantage over their adversaries. The Japanese, Soviet Union, and United States biological weapon programs are merely a few within the world, each committed to their own purpose. These are the countries that will have the history of their weapons programs told within this paper....   [tags: warfare threats] 1066 words
(3 pages)
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Biological Classification: Linnaeus System - The following paper outlines the use of the Linnaeus system of classification as applied in the field of biology and evolution. The aim of the paper is to highlight how living things are related to other in the ecosystem (Pierce, 2007). It takes us through the evolutionary system highlighting all the important features of life development amongst all the living things. Biological classification Classification is the process of categorizing all the living creatures into group hierarchies citing their characteristic features....   [tags: Scientific Research ]
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What is Biological Rhythm? - ... During Ultradian there is a small timeframe of wakefulness where the person can change the sleeping position leading them to falling back to their sleep this rhythm is less deep sleep leading to having the REM timeframe longer. Stages of Non REM Sleep Stage 1 The first stage of sleep is a least 15 minutes of sleep this is the stage we often awake from. Our eyes are closed during this stage but we can easily be awakened by no problem. At times of this stage when people have awakened they may feel as if they hadn’t slept at all....   [tags: periodic environmental change, organisms] 1487 words
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Biological Research: Global Warming - The most adored section of science is the biological study. Biology is vital to the society because it studies life, living organisms and all the aspects that are concerned with their well being. This section of science also studies the origin, evolution, structure, function and the growth of living organisms. This study deals with different aspects of life. The most studied section is the genetics (Rebecca Johnson, 2006). Chimeras’ is mostly common in non-human zoology but also occurs in human though it is a rare phenomenon....   [tags: Entertainment ]
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Biological Constraints on Learning - Learning is defined as a “process of change that occurs as a result of an individual’s experience” (Mazure, 2006). Researchers assume that the process of learning follows certain general principles, which were developed, into the general process learning theories. These include operant conditioning and classical conditioning which has been put forward by leading psychologists like Pavlov, B.F.Skinner and Thorndike. However, in learning, operant and classical conditoning are opposed by biological constraints that state that there are limitations to the theories....   [tags: Education, Learning] 1333 words
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Chemical and Biological Weapons - When a nation or country develops offensive chemical and biological weapons this is not an admittance of intention to use them of threaten other nations and countries with the weapons. (1) The involvement in chemical and biological warfare program in most countries is aimed at developing a defensive capability for the defense forces of that country. The true grey area lies in the facts that to have a productive defensive CBW program it requires the same expertise and resources as a well productive offensive CBW program....   [tags: Warfare, Korea]
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The Biological Criminal Brain - Nature and nurture are no longer a debate; we see the two working together in concert to produce a genuine expression of the individual. The personalities and habits humans acquire in their lives is as much a biological evolution as it is a social or cultural acclimatization. While some people still have the argument that it is nature or it is nurture many people have come to the realization that is has to be both. Both nature and nurture developed who we are and what we become. So the question would remain which one influences us more on if we become a criminal....   [tags: theory, nature, nuture, criminal] 1358 words
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Biological Personality Trait Theory - ... He believed that all humans function based on two separate “Supertrait” categories: 1. Extroversion—Introversion and 2. Neuroticism (AllPsych Online, 2011). He believed that each person would experience a variety of stimuli and would respond to the stimulus. Over time their specific responses would become habitual responses and they would then become “traits.” All traits can be easily categorized under Eysenck’s two “Supertraits.” One of the key arguments against this Supertrait theory is the structured and predictability, something that humans are definitely not....   [tags: characteristics, moods, thoughts, behaviors]
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760 words
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Studies in Biological Sciences - If there are images in this attachment, they will not be displayed. Download the original attachment The word “why” has always been a motive for my learning. The zeal to know more helped me frame my targets and reach the goals of my career so far. I have been blessed to have parents who instilled me with good values and principles. They have supported me in accomplishing the goals I have set forth. To excel in the futuristic workplace of tomorrow, one will need to possess a perfect blend of theoretical study and practical experience....   [tags: career choices, statement of purpose] 1055 words
(3 pages)
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Biology: Biological Fuel Cell - INTRODUCTION A microbial fuel cell (MFC) known as biological fuel cell is a bio-electrochemical system that pushes or produces a current by using bacteria (Bruce et al, 2012). Electricity is produced when the dissolved organic matter oxidized. Factors that effect the electricity production include Proton exchange of the system that also result in the change in the internal resistance of the system. The power retained from these systems is currently limited, by high internal resistance. However, they are studies conducted based on that and hopefully soon improvements in the system architecture will result in power generation that is dependent on the Competencies of the microorganisms (Min et...   [tags: microbial fuel cell, electricity, bacteria] 1723 words
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Biological Warfare - The new technologies of terror and their increasing mobility are improving everyday. Many types of warfare look to take out major numbers of people, and some even look to take specific individuals. The specific technique I will focus on is call Biological warfare. Biological warfare is a type of war that targets specific people or a specific whole country. When Biological warfare is used it usually involves a substance in which to harm others by immediate death, or death by exposure. The substance is usually used within a confined space for maximum exposure to the victims of the gas, disease, or radiation....   [tags: technology, weapon]
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Biological Weapons - Biological weapon which is also termed as germ welfare is the use of pathogens as biological weapon. In this case pathogens include disease causing agents like bacteria, viruses and other disease causing agents. On the other hand when non living toxic products are used though produced by living organism like toxin it is referred to us as chemical warfare. This technology of using chemical warfare is categorized as chemical weapons convention. The following are some of the reason highlighted as the reasons for the use of chemical and biological weapons....   [tags: Terrorism] 583 words
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Biological Control - ... has been proposed to be effective regardless of the agent circumstance. These studies (Morin and Edwards 2006 (in Palmer 2010)) have suggested that desirable agent qualities, exotic weed range and demography and experimental protocols been prioritised in agent effectiveness for biological control programs (need to ref Schooler et al 2006and Sheppard 2006(in Palmer 2010)) Australia construction of 2 new quarantine facilities are currently underway with another two being planned (). This bring the total number of Facilities up to 9 which can house exotic invertebrates, plant pathogens....   [tags: ]
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Biological Indicators - A biological indicator is a device used to monitor the sterilization process for the standard population of bacterial spores. The biological indicators indicate that all the parameters necessary for sterilization were present. They are clear filter strips impregnated with bacterial spores and subjected to sterilization methods. They are tested for remaining presence of bacteria. The absence of bacteria in the final samples validates the method and determines sterilization accuracy levels....   [tags: Medical Research]
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Biological Replicates - Biological Replicates: Two populations of the parasitic trypanosome from each of the hosts – tsetse fly, and a vertebrate, will be isolated as biological replicates. In order to account for biological variation, trypanosome populations must be isolated from at least two different insects, and two different vertebrate hosts. (b) Technical Replicates: Messenger RNA samples will be purified from each of the groups, reverse transcribed to cDNA, which are then differentially fluorescently labeled, either with Cy3 (green) or Cy5 (red)....   [tags: Genetics] 1452 words
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Biological Psychology - Bio-Psychologists study the principles of biology as it relates to the comprehension of psychology in the field neuroscience that underlies ones emotions, ideology, and actions (Brittanica). Based upon the conduction of research, the relationship between the brain and ones behavior extends to the physiological process in one’s intellect. Scientists are cognizant that neurotransmitters function as a significant role in mood regulation and other aspects of psychological problems including depression and anxiety....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Biological Weapons Convention - There is a little known piece of paper that was formed by the United Nations called the Biological Weapons Convention. It was formed in April 1972 as part of an effort for disarmament, production and stockpiling. This document was entered in to force on 26 March 1975, and over the years there have been several conferences to review and amend the Convention. As of today, there are one hundred and ten signatory states and one hundred sixty eight state parties. There are four members of the depositary governments: Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the United States of America....   [tags: United Nations, Disarmament, Production]
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The Use of Biological Weapons During Combat - ... By infecting just a few animals … German operations tried to spark epidemics”(Wheelis 4). World War II. During World War II most of Japans resources were spent on the creation, mass production, and experimentation of biological weapons.Their efforts were directed towards affecting China. “Japanese scientists used scores of chinese subjects to test the lethality [of their creation]… These experiments killed as many as 10000 people”(Wheelis 4). After countless experiments the Japanese military decided to drop paper bags filled with “plague- infested rats.The attacks involved contaminating wells and distributing poisoned food”(Wheelis)....   [tags: corpses, disease, infection] 1926 words
(5.5 pages)
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Comparing the Biological and Psychodynamic Paradigms of Psychopathology - A paradigm is a form of framework of general perspective, which helps and guides the study and treatment of psychopathology The paradigm helps the scientists and psychologists to shape up what they want to investigate, and diagnose in the area of abnormal mental health, understanding paradigms helps them explore subjective influences that may affect their work. And Psychopathology is the study of mental illness or mental distress and the manifestation of behaviours of mental illness or psychological impairment....   [tags: psychology, mental health]
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Synthetic Biological Engineering - ... An advantage of this synthetic engineering that doesn’t have to do with medicine is the idea of it being able to provide us with a way to keep our environment clean. The scientists can build organisms to consume toxic chemicals in water or soil that would not otherwise decompose. The positive aspects of this synthetic engineering are growing every day. The United States is just getting its first glimpse of everything these scientists are working to develop (pbs.org). While there are a great amount of advantages to the developments of biological synthetic engineering, the disadvantages are a pressing matter as well....   [tags: Science, Caution]
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Accusations of Biological Warfare by the US in Korea - Accusations of Biological Warfare by the US in Korea In the 1950s, allegations surfaced that the United States had experimented with biological weapons in remote areas of Northern Korea. “The US government denied the charges of biological weapons use, and this denial was generally supported in the West by eminent scientists who challenged the Needham report. The allegations are still a matter for study.” (Guillemain, 2005, p. 100) The scope of this paper is to neither attempt to solidify the convictions of the accusers, nor is it to vindicate the American government of the time....   [tags: US government, german scientists, lawyers]
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Use of Biological Weapons Through History - Biological weapons are often called the “Poor man’s atomic bomb” (Warfare Introduction). They are called this, because they are cheap and powerful. By definition, biological weapons are “any weapon usable in biological warfare” (WordNet Search-3.1). Another definition for biological weapons is “Biological weapons include any organism or toxin found in nature that can be used to incapacitate, kill, or otherwise impede an adversary” (Dire). Smallpox, ricin and anthrax are all biological weapons. Biological weapons have been used throughout history....   [tags: CDC,weapons, warfare, smallpox]
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894 words
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Jeanne Harley Guillemin on Biological Weapons - ... The effects of the bombs were not thought of prior to their usage. Also in this book, she explains her thoughts on why biological weapons were such unsuccessful military modernizations. Guillemin states: “What made biological weapons a failed military innovation. Even when pathogens were prepared, munitions were tested, and attack plans were formulated, political and military authorities did not cross the line and use them for strategic wartime attacks, when they very well might have. The history of chemical weapons can shed some light on why....   [tags: anthropological view] 3011 words
(8.6 pages)
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Biological Control of Alien Invasive Plants - The scientific field of the biological control of alien invasive plants (AIP) has developed rapidly over the last 100 years in various countries (Morin et al. 2013) but, are some countries performing better than others. Biological control looks to diminish the negative consequences of alien invasive plants. For example, biological control reduces alterations of biotic and abiotic processes produced by AIP occurring within the ecosystem (Richardson and van Wilgen 2004). Major sites of invasion like the United States of America, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Canada have therefore been at the forefront of scientific progress in the field of biological control (Julien and Griffiths 19...   [tags: Alien Invasive Plants]
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Biological, Psychological and Social Influences on Health - This essay aims to explore how biological, psychological and social aspects can have bidirectional and exacerbating influences on the health of an individual or groups. Applying the bio psychosocial model (Engel 1977; Kety 1974) to observations made in an older adult ward whilst in placement practice, discussion will explore how the vicious cycle of factors specific to older age affect the bio psychosocial health aspects of older adults. Older adults are identified as those aged 65 and over, Office for National Statistics (ONS) (2013; Wadrop 2009)....   [tags: older, illness, dementia] 1501 words
(4.3 pages)
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Biological Techniques: Optogenetics - Optogenetics is a relatively new area of technology, first being described in 2005 [1, 2]. This technology has quickly advanced since it was first mentioned and continues to advance at a rapid pace [1]. Despite being a new technology, it is seen as having opened up new areas of biology to investigation [2]. Optogenetics combines different technological aspects from the areas of optics, genetics and bioengineering to allow for all new ways to investigate intact neural circuits [3]. Through optics, this technology allows for the study of certain neurons in an area without compromising neurons surround them and does so “at high temporal and spatial resolution” [1]....   [tags: use of light to control cells in living tissue] 526 words
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