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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Awakening Women"
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening: Women's Role In Society - Have you ever wondered what the lifestyles of Nineteenth Century women were like. Were they independent, career women or were they typical housewives that cooked, clean, watched the children, and catered to their husbands. Did the women of this era express themselves freely or did they just do what society expected of them. Kate Chopin was a female author who wrote several stories and two novels about women. One of her renowned works of art is The Awakening. This novel created great controversy and received negative criticism from literary critics due to Chopin's portrayal of women by Edna throughout the book....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening] 1498 words
(4.3 pages)
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feminaw Seeking a New Identity for Women in The Awakening - Seeking a New Identity for Women in The Awakening        In The Awakening, Chopin questions gender roles. Chopin seeks an identity for women that is neither wife nor mother. To achieve this end, she incorporates progressive feminist ideas into her writing. Yet, in the end, Chopin also shows that, because of years of conditioning, many women are unable to escape society’s stereotypical roles by any satisfactory means. The protagonist of the novel, Edna Pontellier, does not possess the skills needed to become independent and, despite attempts to escape, succumbs finally to the doomed dream of romantic love....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1457 words
(4.2 pages)
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Evaluation of Mother-Women in Chopin’s The Awakening - Evaluation of Mother-Women in Chopin’s The Awakening In short, Mrs. Pontellier was not a mother-woman. The mother women seemed to prevail that summer at Grand Isle. It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood. They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels. (p.29) She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 638 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Awakening: An Emergence of Women's RIghts in the Late Nineteenth Century - ... Clearly, The Awakening challenges the role of a woman in nineteenth century society. A woman’s purpose is centered on childbirth and child rearing. Women are expected to naturally receive pleasure from motherhood. According to Stone, birthing is a symbol for the rebirth of Edna as an artist. Stone argues that Edna shows progress throughout the novel and becomes more “self-defined,” rather than passive and regressive as argued by many scholars additionally. Birth also becomes a symbol for spiritual rebirth....   [tags: Kate Chopin's novel analysis]
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1337 words
(3.8 pages)
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Oppression of Women in "The Awakening" - Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening in the opening chapter provides the argument for women's entrapment in roles that society has forced upon them. Chopin was not just trying to write an entertaining story but trying to convey arguments against these social injustices. Women are like these birds trapped in these cages unable to free themselves from these imposed roles by society. Chopin opens her novel with the a parrot in a cage repeating the same phrase over and over. The parrot is pretty to look at, but when the bird speaks it is very annoying....   [tags: American Literature] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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Society's Restrictive Roles for Women Exposed in The Awakening - In the late 1800's, as well as the early 1900's, women felt discriminated against by men and by society in general. Men generally held discriminatory and stereotypical views of women. Women had no control over themselves and were perceived to be nothing more than property to men. They were expected to live up to a perfect image that society had created, while trying to comply with their husbands' desires. While many women felt dissatisfied with their lives, they would not come out and say it. However, in 1899, Kate Chopin wrote The Awakening, which showed women that they were not alone....   [tags: discrimination towards women]
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1210 words
(3.5 pages)
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Women and Society in The Awakening and The Father of Désirée’s Baby - Kate Chopin’s texts The Awakening and “The Father of Désirée’s Baby” explore themes such as the societal conventions placed on women in the late 1800’s and the role of women in the (institution) of marriage. The women of the texts: Edna Pontellier, Chopin’s protagonist in The Awakening and Désirée, Chopin’s protagonist in the “The Father of Désirée’s Baby” both die tragically, due to their inability to upkeep the social values placed upon them. Because both of the women take their own lives at the end of the text, the underlying message Chopin seems to be conveying is one of warning: a warning to those women who have supposedly been inappropriate in marriage by highlighting the consequences;...   [tags: Kate Chopin]
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1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Women's Issues in The Awakening by Kate Chopin, The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Souls Belated by Edith Wharton - Women's Issues in The Awakening by Kate Chopin, The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Souls Belated by Edith Wharton In comparing the three authors and the literary works of women authors Kate Chopin (1850 -1904), The Awakening, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's (1860-1935), The Yellow Wallpaper, and Edith Wharton's (1862-1937) Souls Belated, a good number common social issues related to women are brought to light and though subtly pointed out are an outcry against the conventions of the time....   [tags: Awakening Yellow Belated Essays]
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1014 words
(2.9 pages)
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Women are not only Beautiful, but Equal: The Awakening by Kate Chopin - ... Then he push his thing inside my pussy. When that hurt, I cry. He start to choke me, saying You better shut up and git used to it (Walker, 7). Later, when Celie’s step-father gets her forcefully married, her husband also beats her for no apparent reason. Within The Color Purple, the majority of the men attempt to instill fear within women to state a sense of inequality, that they are the higher sex. “He beat me today cause he say I winked at a boy in church. I may have got somethin in my eye but I didn’t wink....   [tags: sexism, domestic responsibiities] 1300 words
(3.7 pages)
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How The Yellow-Wallpaper and The Awakening Influenced America's View on Women - ... In the texts “The Yellow-Wallpaper,” and “The Awakening,” shows how exactly women were changing thus influencing the changes in America’s views on women. These stories that reflected on the changes of a hand full of women gave courage to the rest to become their true self; living their lives and in the process neglecting their traditional expectations.. Regardless of what men thought was right, the development of women was recognized amongst everyone and had caused a significant impact on America’s perspective on women....   [tags: rebellion, courageous, norms]
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627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston - In the nineteen thirties, women were raised with a strict criteria for the way they were required to live their lives. Regardless of love, women only strived to marry men who owned great deals of land. In their eyes, the more land their husbands owned, the more stability they were offered. They lived at their husband’s beck and call, and did not openly oppose to their thoughts. Women rarely strayed away from what was socially acceptable, and ignored what the main character, Janie, from Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston, could not....   [tags: women's role, social awakening]
:: 5 Works Cited
1373 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Typical Role of Women in the Late 19th Century in the Awakening by Kate Chopin - ... In the novel, Edna places her family, especially her children, last and pursues the freedoms of education, money and sex. With a spirit of rebellion and desire to part from society’s norm, Edna “grew daring and reckless, overestimating her strength. She wanted to swim far out, where no woman had swum before” (Chopin, 36). Eventually she goes as far as exploring the freedom of death as she commits suicide, further challenging the behavior of women in her time. As Edna breaks from the expectations imposed on her, Chopin creates a character that shares the desires that oppressed women were not allowed to express in her time....   [tags: edna, mother-wife] 563 words
(1.6 pages)
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Women´s Role in Kate Chopins Literature: The Yellow Paper and The Awakening - ... People believed that since they didn’t have husbands or children to look after, that they were lonely and miserable women. In reality they could have been very friendly and loving women. But since they didn’t fill their roles in society, there had to be something wrong with them. They were often ostracized unless they had a “useful talent”. Then there were women like Edna. Edna Pontellier was the main character of The Awakening. Edna completely rebelled against all of the standards set for her by society....   [tags: image, media, society] 1272 words
(3.6 pages)
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Comparing Women´s Images in The Yellow Wallpaper and The Awakening - Women´s Images in The Yellow Wallpaper and The Awakening The aim of this essay is analyse women´s images in The Yellow Wallpaper and in The Awakening, since the two readings have become the focus of feminist controversy. Both stories were written by women, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Kate Chopin. But is this fact important to understand the aim of every story. Would they have had the same effect if the had been written by men. I will explore these matters. I also considered it could be rather interesting to study and compare how heroines act, how they are constricted by patriarchy, how their husbands treat them, and if they triumph or not, in every story....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 3073 words
(8.8 pages)
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Women in The Awakening and the short stories “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins - A feminist is a person who believes in the social, political and economic equality in the sexes however, in the 1890’s feminists did not exist as a result of patriarchal oppression. This time, women were expected to be devoted to their husband and children while continuing their mundane roles as housewives. Although, women during the 19th century began to feel suffocated living within the strict social roles, they had to follow the norm, although some wanted liberty. Feminist ideas can be exposed in literature and feminist literary theory, focuses on the complex ways of women with no social power and expected roles in a “man’s world.” According to Donald Hall, one of his key principles about...   [tags: Repression, Feminism, Patriarcal Society]
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1239 words
(3.5 pages)
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Oppression of Women in Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper - Edna Pontellier of Kate Chopin’s work The Awakening as well as the nameless female narrator of Charlotte Perkin Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper both experienced similar forms of gendered oppression, who have become frustrated with their conventional womanly roles. In having like experiences, these literary works prove effective in relaying the issue of gender inequalities among men and women in the late 1800s to early 1900s. Although both Chopin and Gilman’s portrayal of their character’s dissatisfaction with women’s societal roles resemble one another in more than one way and they both fight for their autonomy, they do differ in the types of independence from a patriarchal society...   [tags: story and character analysis] 1138 words
(3.3 pages)
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A Male Dominated Society During the 19th Century - During the 19th century, women were controlled by a male dominated society. The women were in pure agony knowing that there was no faith for them to have a crucial change in civilization. This could often lead to “clinical depression” in which a human could feel lonely, empty, confounded and miserable. In this time period, women’s role in society was to be simply mothers and wives. A world where women had rights, control, and power was a fantasy. According to Hall, he states, “Key to all feminist methodologies is the belief that patriarchal oppression of women through history has been profound and multifaceted” (Hall 202)....   [tags: women's role, 19th century, the awakening]
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963 words
(2.8 pages)
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Kate Chopin: Her Life and Its Influences of The Awakening - Kate Chopin, born February 8, 1850, used her life’s experiences to express strong opinions to her 1900s American audience. Although her work was criticized for its honesty and audaciousness, by the late 1900s Chopin’s work was considered as brilliant literature that accurately described women of the late 1800s. The Awakening was Chopin’s most famous work, however it nearly ended her writing career due to the violent backlash she received for writing such a truthful novel about women in a time which they were still considered inferior to men....   [tags: American women authors]
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980 words
(2.8 pages)
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Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - The Feminist Awakening - The Feminist Awakening   Women’s rights have evolved over time; beginning with being homemakers and evolving to obtaining professions, acquiring an education, and gaining the right to vote. The movement that created all these revolutionary changes was called the feminist movement. The feminist movement occurred in the twentieth century. Many people are not aware of the purpose of the feminist movement. The movement was political and social and it sought to set up equality for women. Women’s groups in the United States worked together to win women’s suffrage and later to create and support the Equal Rights Amendment....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening]
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2101 words
(6 pages)
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - Illogical, submissive, and sensual are some of the words used to describe the view of women during the nineteenth century. In the novel The Awakening, Kate Chopin tells the controversial story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, and her spiritual growing. Throughout the story, Edna constantly battles between her heart’s desires and society’s standard. The novel shows how two women’s lives influence Edna throughout the novel. Mademoiselle Reisz and Madame Ratignolle are both in their own way strong, motherly influences in Edna’s life....   [tags: awakening, kate chopin]
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1258 words
(3.6 pages)
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Exploring the Nature and Effects of the Fall of Adam and Kate Chopin´s The Awakening - Exploring the Nature and Effects of Original Sin Assignment 1 When Man took the fruit of the Forbidden Tree, we lost that close relationship with God and Adam and Eve were casted and banned from the Garden of Eden. This story is perhaps the strongest example of a huge turning point in human history since it is because of their Original Sin the descendants of Adam and Eve are greatly affected. In this paper I will argue that woman’s punishment “…yet your desire shall be for you husband, and he shall rule over you.” (Gen....   [tags: Catholicism, Women, Submission]
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745 words
(2.1 pages)
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Feminist Protagonists in The Awakening and A Doll's House - The Feminist Protagonists in The Awakening and A Doll's House   The idea of women's liberation is a common theme in both Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House. In her analysis of Feminism in Europe Katharine M. Rogers writes, " Thinking of Nora's painful disillusionment, her parting from her children, and the uncertainties of her future independent career, Ibsen called his play 'the tragedy of modern times'" (82). The main characters in each work, Nora Helmer, in A Doll House, and Edna Pontellier, in The Awakening, portray feminist ideas....   [tags: Feminism Feminist Women Criticism]
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756 words
(2.2 pages)
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Alice Walker’s The Color Purple And Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - Throughout history society has been controlled by men, and because of this women were exposed to some very demanding expectations. A woman was expected to be a wife, a mother, a cook, a maid, and sexually obedient to men. As a form of patriarchal silencing any woman who deviated from these expectations was often a victim of physical, emotional, and social beatings. Creativity and individuality were dirty, sinful and very inappropriate for a respectful woman. By taking away women’s voices, men were able to remove any power that they might have had....   [tags: Women Expectations, Gender Roles, Contrasts] 1054 words
(3 pages)
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Marriage and Respect in "The Awakening" and "The Revolt of ‘Mother" - The novel, The Awakening, and the short story, “The Revolt of ‘Mother,’” both stories have women that are not respected by their husbands. Both of the women, Edna Pontellier and Sarah Penn, have husbands who do not respect them, but they fight back in different ways. Their battles shows the differences between these two women from an earlier and less accepting time. They are both strong willed characters. They both believe strongly enough in themselves that they will go to the extremes. Sarah moves out of her house....   [tags: Awakening, Revolt of Mother, Marriage,]
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840 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Significance of Art in Chopin's The Awakening - Edna seeks occupational freedom in art, but lacks sufficient courage to become a true artist. As Edna awakens to her selfhood and sensuality, she also awakens to art. Originally, Edna “dabbled” with sketching “in an unprofessional way” (Chopin 543). She could only imitate, although poorly (Dyer 89). She attempts to sketch Adèle Ratignolle, but the picture “bore no resemblance” to its subject. After her awakening experience in Grand Isle, Edna begins to view her art as an occupation (Dyer 85). She tells Mademoiselle Reisz that she is “becoming an artist” (Chopin 584)....   [tags: the awakening]
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887 words
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Essay on The Awakening - Critical Views of The Awakening       The Awakening, written by Kate Chopin, is full of ideas and understanding about human nature. In Chopin's time, writing a story with such great attention to sensual details in both men and women caused skepticism among readers and critics. However, many critics have different views with deeper thought given to The Awakening. Symbolism, the interpretation of Edna's suicide, and awakenings play important roles in the analysis of all critics.   Symbolism in The Awakening is interpreted in many ways....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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728 words
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The Importance of Setting and Symbols in "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin - Ranging from caged parrots to the meadow in Kentucky, symbols and settings in The Awakening are prominent and provide a deeper meaning than the text does alone. Throughout The Awakening by Kate Chopin, symbols and setting recur representing Edna’s current progress in her awakening. The reader can interpret these and see a timeline of Edna’s changes and turmoil as she undergoes her changes and awakening. The setting Edna is in directly affects her temperament and awakening: Grand Isle provides her with a sense of freedom; New Orleans, restriction; the “pigeon house”, relief from social constraints....   [tags: Setting, Symbols, Awakening, Kate Chopin, ]
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999 words
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Identity and Society's Expectations In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Edna Pontellier’s suicide is an assertion of her independence and contributes to Chopin’s message that to be independent one must choose between personal desires and societal expectations. Chopin conveys this message through Edna’s reasons for committing suicide and how doing so leads her to total independence. Unlike the other women of Victorian society, Edna is unwilling to suppress her personal identity and desires for the benefit of her family. She begins “to realize her position in the universe as a human being and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her” (35)....   [tags: the awakening] 598 words
(1.7 pages)
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A Futile Awakening - Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, transcends societal structures and expectations. It deals with the day-to-day realities that a woman must face if she is to progress to full maturation and become at peace with herself and the world. Set in turn-of-the-century Creole New Orleans, it addresses the relentless strength and courage required for a woman to remain true to her convictions. Most studies of The Awakening focus on Edna Pontellier's newly emerged awareness and struggle against the societal forces that repress her....   [tags: Kate Chopin's The Awakening]
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3448 words
(9.9 pages)
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The Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening - The Metaphorical Lesbian in Chopin’s The Awakening In “The Metaphorical Lesbian: Edna Pontellier in The Awakening” Elizabeth LeBlanc asserts that the character Edna Pontellier is an example of what Bonnie Zimmerman calls the “metaphorical lesbian.” It’s important to distinguish between Zimmerman’s concept of the “metaphorical lesbian” and lesbianism. The “metaphorical lesbian” does not have to act on lesbian feelings or even become conscious of herself as a lesbian. Instead, the “metaphorical lesbian” creates a space for woman-identified relationships and experiences in a heterosexually hegemonic environment....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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Essay on the Characters in The Awakening - Importance of the Characters in The Awakening   The Awakening was a very exciting and motivating story. It contains some of the key motivational themes that launched the women’s movement. It was incredible to see how women were not only oppressed, but how they had become so accustomed to it, that they were nearly oblivious to the oppression. The one woman, Edna Pontellier, who dared to have her own feelings was looked upon as being mentally ill. The pressure was so great, that in the end, the only way that she felt she could be truly free was to take her own life....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Themes and Images in The Awakening - "The water of the Gulf stretched out before her, gleaming with the million lights of the sun. The voice of the sea is seductive, never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander in the abysses of solitude. All along the white beach, up and down, there was no living thing in sight. A bird with a broken wing was beating the air above, reeling, fluttering, circling disabled down, down to the water." Chapter XXXIX Edna Pontellier, a woman no longer certain of who she is....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1476 words
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Understanding Chopin's The Awakening - Understanding Chopin's The Awakening By reading The Awakening, the reader gets a sense of what the life of a Creole woman is like.  In actuality, though, it is not until reading the etiquette books, Chopin’s biographical information, and essays about the treatment of women at the time that there can be a deeper understanding of the rules Edna is breaking. Passages from Chopin's Biographical Information Fawned over as a society belle, admired for her cleverness and musical talent, Kate wrote what she really thought in her diary: “I dance with people I despise; amuse myself with men whose only talent is in their feet.” She wrote advice about how to flirt (just keep asking, “What do you th...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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794 words
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - During the late nineteenth century, the time of protagonist Edna Pontellier, a woman's place in society was confined to worshipping her children and submitting to her husband. Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, encompasses the frustrations and the triumphs in a woman's life as she attempts to cope with these strict cultural demands. Defying the stereotype of a "mother-woman," Edna battles the pressures of 1899 that command her to be a subdued and devoted housewife. Although Edna's ultimate suicide is a waste of her struggles against an oppressive society, The Awakening supports and encourages feminism as a way for women to obtain sexual freedom, financial independence, and individual identi...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1882 words
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Showalter’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening - Showalter’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening In “Tradition and the Female Talent: The Awakening as a Solitary Book,” Elaine Showalter makes a compelling argument that “Edna Pontellier’s ‘unfocused yearning’ for an autonomous life is akin to Kate Chopin’s yearning to write works that go beyond female plots and feminine endings” (204). Urging her reader to read The Awakening “in the context of literary tradition,” Showalter demonstrates the ways in which Chopin’s novel both builds upon and departs from the tradition of American women’s writing up to that point....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 598 words
(1.7 pages)
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Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way. She would sometimes gather them passionately to her heart; she would sometimes forget them. The year before they had spent part of the summer with their grandmother Pontellier in Iberville. Feeling secure regarding their happiness and welfare, she did not miss them except with an occasional intense longing. Their absence was a sort of relief, though she did not admit this, even to herself....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 437 words
(1.2 pages)
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Yaeger’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening - Yaeger’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening In “‘A Language Which Nobody Understood’: Emancipatory Strategies in The Awakening,” Patricia Yaeger questions the feminist assumption that Edna Pontellier’s adulterous behavior represent a radical challenge to patriarchal values. Using a deconstructionist method, Yaeger argues that in the novel adultery functions not as a disrupting agent of, but, rather, as a counterweight to the institution of marriage, reinforcing the very idea it purports to subvert by framing female desire within “an elaborate code [of moral conduct] that has already been negotiated by her society.” A reading of The Awakening that can envision only two possible outcomes f...   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 992 words
(2.8 pages)
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LeBlanc’s Gender Criticism of Chopin’s The Awakening - LeBlanc’s Gender Criticism of Chopin’s The Awakening Tomorrow marks thirty years since the Roe vs. Wade decision that gave women a reproductive choice in America. The occasion reminds me that women are continuously struggling to attain and maintain various levels of freedom. Elizabeth LeBlanc’s gender criticism of The Awakening---a novel published before women acquired suffrage---highlights one such freedom: the freedom to live on one’s own terms. The discussion delineates how Kate Chopin’s tale of one woman’s “choices, actions and attitudes may be construed as the attempts of a woman trapped in a sexually (in)different world to reconstitute herself as lesbian” (241)....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 497 words
(1.4 pages)
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growaw Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna Pontellier’s Awakening - Edna's Awakening in Kate Chopin's The Awakening       The society of Grand Isle places many expectations on its women to belong to men and be subordinate to their children. Edna Pontellier's society, therefore, abounds with "mother-women," who "idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it to a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals".  The characters of Adele Ratignolle and Mademoiselle Reisz represent what society views as the suitable and unsuitable woman figures....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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902 words
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Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - The Controversial Views in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's The Awakening is truly a novel that stands out from the rest. From the moment it was published, it has been caused women to examine their beliefs. The fact that The Awakening was shunned when first published, yet now taught in classrooms across the country is proof that The Awakening is full of rebellious and controversial ideas. One of the main themes explored in The Awakening is that of a woman's place in society....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1210 words
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Theme of Entrapment in The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper - Theme of Entrapment in The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper Topics of great social impact have been dealt with in many different ways and in many different mediums. Beginning with the first women’s movement in the 1850’s, the role of women in society has been constantly written about, protested, and debated. Two women writers who have had the most impact in the on-going women’s movement are Kate Chopin and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper are two of feminist literature’s cornerstones and have become prolific parts of American literature....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1232 words
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Romanticism, Realism and Local Color in The Awakening - Romanticism, Realism and Local Color in The Awakening Kate Chopin is an author who was born in 1851 and died in 1904. Her father died when she was young, and her husband died when she was thirty-one leaving her with six children. Due to this, she had little male influence throughout her life. This may possibly be why she had so little inhibition when writing her novels. She seemed to concentrate on the oppression of women and presented socially unacceptable ideas at the time of their publication....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1004 words
(2.9 pages)
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Love and Self in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Love and Self in The Awakening                  Kate Chopin's The Awakening is often said to triumph the exploration on the emotional and sexual needs of women, and the novel certainly is about that to a great extent, but even more importantly, it is a quest for individuality and the meaning of love. Through the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, Chopin describes in her novel one woman's journey towards self-consciousness. Several stages of 'awakenings' can be detected on the road, which are discussed in detail, along with the themes of romantic love, possession and an individual self....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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3479 words
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Relationship between Chopin's Life and The Awakening - Relationship between Chopin's Life and The Awakening Katherine O'Flahtery Chopin was born in St. Louis, Missouri February 8,1851. She was the daughter of Thomas and Eliza O'Flaherty, a prominent Irish-born merchant and his wife. Together, Chopin's parents represented freedom and the American dream. Their ambition and spirit helped mold Chopin into a unique character with independence and intelligence. Her father died suddenly when Chopin was four years old. His death was the result of a terrible accident that took the lives of several civic leaders when the key link to the Pacific Railroad was being completed and a bridge collapsed....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1364 words
(3.9 pages)
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Free Awakening Essays: A Reader Response - A Reader Response to The Awakening The Awakening is a story that was written when women weren't allowed to be independent. Kate Chopin was even criticized for the main character's conduct; "Certainly there is throughout the story an undercurrent of sympathy of Edna, and nowhere a single note of censure of her totally unjustifiable conduct" and another said; "the purport of the story can hardly be described in language fit for publication." But who can blame them. Edna was a bold woman. She was independent, kept male friends, felt passion, was disrespectful to her husband and did not spend much time with her children....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 829 words
(2.4 pages)
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Kate Chopin The Awakening - Kate Chopin The Awakening To what extent does Edna Pontellier, in Kate Chopin's The Awakening, mark a departure from the female characters of earlier nineteenth-century American novels The Awakening was published in 1899, and it immediately created a controversy. Contemporaries of Kate Chopin (1851-1904) were shocked by her depiction of a woman with active sexual desires, who dares to leave her husband and have an affair. Instead of condemning her protagonist, Chopin maintains a neutral, non-judgmental tone throughout and appears to even condone her character's unconventional actions....   [tags: Kate Chopin The Awakening Literature Papers]
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Free Awakening Essays: Kate Chopin - The Awakening: Kate Chopin Kate Chopin was an American author who lived during the nineteenth century, but because of The Awakening, a novel which was considered scandalous at the time, she has just recently been "…accepted into the canon of major American writers"(Trosky 105). Through Kate Chopin’s main character of The Awakening, Edna Pontellier, she is able to portray her feelings and desires that were otherwise suppressed by the ideals of American society at that time. Kate Chopin was born on February 8, 1851 in St....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1278 words
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Essay on The Awakening as Romantic, Realistic, and Local Color Writing - The Awakening as an Example of  Romantic, Realistic, and Local Color Writing A fair woman slowly, but surely, makes her way into the water.  It is obvious that she is slightly afraid, but not to the point where she is willing to stop progressing into the gradually deepening water.  She believes that after she lets the water grab her life, everything will be fine.  Sounds appealing?  I did not think so.  However, Edna Pontellier thinks that this is the best option for her.  Drowning seems to be the only way out.  The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, describes Edna Pontellier's battle against society, and how she decides to handle this battle.  This novel was considered an immoral piece of liter...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 814 words
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feminaw freeaw Kate Chopin's The Awakening as a Story of Independence - The Awakening: A Story of Independence Kate Chopin's The Awakening tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a Southern wife and mother. At the time this novel was published, women did as they were expected by society. They were expected to be good daughters, good wives, and good mothers. A woman was expected to move from the protection of her father's roof to the protection of her husband. Edna did not fit this mold, and that eventually leads her husband to send for a doctor. When her husband does this Edna Pontellier says words, which define The Awakening, "I don't want anything but my own way....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 667 words
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The Controlling Men of The Awakening - The Grand Isle society and inhabitants put great expectations on its women to belong to their men and be secondary to their children. Throughout Kate Chopin's dramatic novel The Awakening, she tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a woman who throughout the story tries to find herself using various different methods until it leads to her untimely demise. Kate Chopin tries to make the women look more as possessions rather than people. Edna Pontellier's society, therefore, flourishes with "mother-women," who "idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it to a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals" (12)....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening] 964 words
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The Pursuit of Human Freedom in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre - In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, one of the most prevalent and recurring themes and ideas relates to human freedom. The main characters in the two novels, Edna Pontellier and Jane Eyre, both long for social, religious, and sexual emancipation among other things – freedom from the constraints of Victorian society, which have rendered them dependent and inferior to men. While it is true that both protagonists of their respective novels wanted emancipation, their living conditions and qualities of life varied widely....   [tags: The Awakening, Jane Eyre, compare, contrast]
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freeaw Not Ready for Freedom in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Not Ready for Freedom in The Awakening In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, the main character, Edna Pontellier makes a very long, painful journey into her inner self. At the end of this journey she discovers that she is not strong enough to adopt a life in which a woman is her own woman and lives for herself. This forces her to choose the only other option available to her. I think the propriety with which Edna struggles (and most often gives in to) as she begins to discover who she is and what she wants creates a thick, almost suffocating atmosphere of tension....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 897 words
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growaw Unfulfilled Edna Pontellier of Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Unfulfilled Edna of The Awakening As evidenced in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, and other novels of the 1800’s, women writers of this period seem to feel very repressed. Leonce Pontellier seemed to be fond of his wife, and treated her as one would treat a loved pet. In the beginning of the story it describes him as looking at her as a “valuable piece of personal property”. He does not value her fully as a human being more as a piece of property. However, he expects her to be everything he thinks she should be....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 763 words
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Edna, the Anti-Mother-Woman in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna, the Anti-Mother-Woman in Chopin’s The Awakening In short, Mrs. Pontellier was not a mother-woman. The mother- women seemed to prevail that summer at Grand Isle. It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings, when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood. They were women who idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels. (29) She had all her life long been accustomed to harbor thoughts and emotions which never voiced themselves....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 568 words
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The Awakening - American author Kate Chopin wrote two published novels and about a hundred short stories in the 1890s Most of her fiction is set in Louisiana and most of her best-known work focuses on the lives of sensitive, intelligent women. Her short stories were well received in her own time and were published by some of America’s most prestigious magazines—Vogue, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Young People, and Century. Her early novel At Fault (1890) had not been much noticed by the public, but The Awakening (1899) was widely condemned....   [tags: Gender Lens Analysis]
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The Awakening - The Awakening, a well known book by Kate Chopin, written about a lady during the “Awakening” when so much chaos and trouble was going through the streets of the city. The main character of the book is Edna Pontellier. Throughout the book, Edna had many dilemma’s in her own personal life, and in advance, she had her life in chaos along with the society that affected her as well. 19th century America was a whole new generation coming up to a new generation creating new ideas and then displaying them, which the public got the fact that they had just as much right to do it as anybody else....   [tags: Literature Review] 845 words
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The Awakening - Kenneth Eble states, “…She undertook to give the unsparing truth about women’s submerged life” (2). Speaking solely about Kate Chopin, this quote puts emphasis upon Chopin’s disputes with her society. She used her writing as a technique to indirectly explicate her life by the means of narrating her stories through the characters she created. Kate Chopin was one of the modern writers of her time, one who wrote novels concentrating on the common social matters related to women. Her time period consisted of other female authors that focused on the same central theme during the era: exposing the unfairness of the patriarchal society, and women’s search for selfhood, and their search for identity...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Kate Chopin] 1891 words
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The Awakening - The Awakening is set in 1899, a time when the Industrial Revolution and the women's movement were just beginning, yet still overshadowed by the attitudes of society. Kate Chopin's idea that a woman’s needs were important was radical, especially since women were not considered independent, and women’s rights were just beginning to be fought. Edna's major conflict was her need for independence and personal fulfillment while still trying to conform to her traditional upbringing. Edna was expected to be a perfect wife and mother, both while vacationing on Grand Isle and living in New Orleans....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, Kate Chopin] 1030 words
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The Awakening - Kate Chopin wrote for a reason and with a sense of passion and desire. She lived the way she wanted to and wrote what she felt, thought, and wanted to say. Kate wrote for many years and her popularity was extreme until critical disapproval of her novel, The Awakening, a story that portrayed women’s desires of independence and control of their own sexuality. Most men condemned this story, while women applauded her for it. Kate wrote with a sense of realism and naturalism and she created a voice that is unique and unmatched....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Kate Chopin] 1558 words
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The Awakening: America Was Not Ready For Edna Pontellier - The late nineteenth century was a time of great social, technological, and cultural change for America. Boundaries were rapidly evolving. New theories challenging age-old beliefs were springing up everywhere, such as Darwin's natural selection. This post-Civil War era also gave men and women opportunities to work side-by-side, and in 1848, the first woman's rights conference was held in Seneca Fall, New York. These events leading up to the twentieth century had polished the way for the new, independent woman to be introduced....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening]
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symbolaw Symbols and Symbolism Essay - Symbolism in the Title of Chopin's Awakening - Symbolism in the Title of Chopin's Awakening Kate Chopin entitled her second and final novel, The Awakening. In doing so she did not just give an abstract name to her work, but she chose a title with meaning and symbolism. By titling her work The Awakening, Chopin is indicating her feelings and opinions of the Creole society, Edna, her life, and her ultimate decision. The title also symbolizes how Edna defies the constraints of her ordained life as a Creole women and becomes and individual....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 559 words
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feminaw Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna Pontellier, A Woman Ahead of her Time - A Woman Ahead of her Time in The Awakening   When she published The Awakening in 1899, Kate Chopin startled her public with a frank portrayal of a woman’s social, sexual, and spiritual awakening. Because it told its particular truth without judgment or censure, the public disapproved. The idea of a true autonomy for women, or, more astounding yet a single sexual standard for men and women — was too much to imagine. Kate Chopin’s presentation of the awakening of her heroine, Edna Pontellier, her unblinking recognition that respectable women did indeed have sexual feelings proved too strong for many who read her novel....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 673 words
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symbolaw Symbols and Symbolism Essay - Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's The Awakening is a literary work full of symbolism. Birds, clothes, houses and other narrative elements are powerful symbols which add meaning to the novel and to the characters. I will analyze the most relevant symbols presented in Chopin's literary work. BIRDS The images related to birds are the major symbolic images in the narrative from the very beginning of the novel: "A green and yellow parrot, which hung in a cage outside the door, kept repeating over and over: `Allez vous-en....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1932 words
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growaw Edna Pontellier’s Identity in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Identity in The Awakening Kate Chopin's The Awakening is about a woman's growing sense of identity. The novel takes place on an island south of New Orleans and in New Orleans. Edna Pontellier is 28 years old when she "wakes up". Her husband Leonce Pontellier is much older than she - forty years old. The Awakening opens when Mr. Pontellier - a businessman- is disturbed by the noise some parrots are doing. They repeat "Allez vous-en!" which means go away. It sounds such as an invitation to Edna to leave her cage of marriage....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 738 words
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Edna Pontellier and Social Limitations in Kate Chopin's Awakening -          In discussing Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, critic Susan Rosowski categorizes the novel under the heading of "the novel of awakening" and differentiates it from the bildungsroman, the apprentice novel, in which the usually male protagonist "learn the nature of the world, discover its meaning and pattern, and acquire a philosophy of life and ‘the art of living'" (Bloom 43). In the novel of awakening, the female protagonist similarly learns about the world, but for the heroine, the world is defined in terms of love and marriage, and "the art of living" comes with a realization that such art is difficult or impossible; the price for the art is often tragic endings....   [tags: Feminism Feminist Women Criticism]
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Kate Chopin's Awakening - Edna Pontellier as Master of Her Destiny -          In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, the main character, Edna leaves her husband to find place in the world. Edna believes her new sexually independent power will make her master of her own life. But, as Martin points out, she has overestimated her strength and is still hampered by her "limited ability to direct her energy and to master her emotions" (22). Unfortunately, Edna has been educated too much in the traditions of society and not enough in reason and independent survival, admitting to Robert that "we women learn so little of life on the whole" (990)....   [tags: Feminism Feminist Women Criticism]
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Sexual Fulfillment in Chopin's Awakening - Society keeps order, allows for advancement, and gives humanity a good face. It also imposes morals, roles, and limits a person's potential development. If someone wishes to reach beyond what society expects of them, they must cast aside social restrictions. Edna Pontellier, in Kate Chopin's The Awakening, feels the urge to cast off the veil society burdens her with and live as she chooses to. The driving factor behind her desire to awaken is her lack of sexual fulfillment. She lives her life following conduct becoming of a woman who marries into the Creole elite of New Orleans....   [tags: The Awakening Essays] 886 words
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Feminism in "The Awakening" - In the novel The Awakening, by Kate Chopin the critical approach feminism is a major aspect of the novel. According to dictionary.reference.com the word feminism means, “The doctrine advocating social, political, and all other rights of women equal to those of men.” The Awakening takes place during the late eighteen hundreds to early nineteen hundreds, in New Orleans. The novel is about Edna Pontellier and her family on a summer vacation. Edna, who is a wife and mother, is inferior to her husband, Leonce, and must live by her husband’s desires....   [tags: Literary Themes]
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Edna’s Symbolic Swim in The Awakening - Edna’s Symbolic Swim in The Awakening Reading through The Awakening for the first time, a passage in chapter X intrigued me: Edna’s first successful swim. I begin my close reading halfway through page 49, “But that night she was like the little tottering, stumbling, clutching child, who of a sudden realizes its powers, and walks for the first time alone, boldly and with over-confidence.” Her success is sudden and in spite of assistance from “the men and women; in some instances from the children” throughout the summer....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 528 words
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Edna and Conformity in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna and Conformity in Chopin’s The Awakening The passage of The Awakening which truly marks Edna Pontellier’s new manner of thought regarding her life revolves around her remembrance of a day of her childhood in Kentucky. She describes the scene to Madame Ratigonelle as the two women sit on the beach one summer day. The passage opens with a description of the sea and the sky on that particular day. This day and its components are expressed in lethargic terms such as “idly” and “motionless” and suggested a scene of calm sleep....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 618 words
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Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening - Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening Several passages in The Awakening struck me because of their similar imagery—a bird, wings, and nudity. The first passage I looked at is in Chapter 9 where Edna Pontellier has a vision of a naked man “standing beside a desolate rock” (47) on a beach who is watching a bird fly away. This image was evoked by a one particular piece that Mme Ratignolle plays which Edna significantly calls “Solitude. ” Apparently Edna frequently envisions certain images while listening to music: “Musical strains, well rendered, had a way of evoking pictures in her mind” (47)....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 734 words
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The Search for Language in The Awakening - The Search for Language in The Awakening       Kate Chopin’s novel, The Awakening, tells the story of a late nineteenth century woman trying to break away from the male-dominated society to find an identity of her own.  Edna Pontellier is trying to find herself when only two personas are available to her: the ‘true woman,’ the classic wife and mother, or the ‘new woman,’ the radical women demanding equality with men.  Patricia S. Yaeger, in her essay “‘A Language Which Nobody Understood’: Emancipatory Strategies in The Awakening,” argues that what Edna is really searching for is a female language of her own.  Edna is prevented from finding her own language and ideal and therefore is trap...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Use of Aviary Symbolism in The Awakening - Use of Aviary Symbolism in The Awakening   Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening is full of symbolism.  Symbols add meaning and depth to the text. Chopin underscores the expression "free as a bird" through the consistent use of aviary symbolism in The Awakening. Throughout the story she cleverly weaves images and descriptions of birds to express the psychological state of mind of her main character, Edna Pontellier. Perhaps the most obvious example of this symbolism is in the first spoken sentences of the novel, which, strangely enough, are not uttered by a human, but rather screeched by a parrot....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Chopin's The Awakening is full of symbolism.  Rather than hit the reader on the head with blunt literalism, Chopin uses symbols to relay subtle ideas.  Within each narrative segment, Chopin provides a symbol that the reader must fully understand in order to appreciate the novel as a whole.  I will attempt to dissect some of the major symbols and give possible explanations as to their importance within the text.  Art itself is a symbol of both freedom and failure.  In her attempt to become an artist, Edna reaches the zenith of her awakening.  She begins to truly understand pure art as a means of self-expression as well as self-assertion.  In a si...   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays Kate]
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Naked and Free in The Awakening - Naked and Free in The Awakening The Awakening, by Kate Chopin seems to fit neatly into twentieth century ideals. Chopin addresses psychological issues that must have been difficult for people of the late nineteenth century to grasp. Just as Edna died a premature death, Chopin's book died too. The rejection of this book, at the time, ironically demonstrates the pressure many women must have felt to conform to society. Chopin shows the reader, through Edna Pontellier, that society restricts women the right to individuality....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 491 words
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Theme of Isolation in The Awakening - Theme of Isolation in The Awakening       One theme apparent in Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, is the consequence of solitude when independence is chosen over conformity. The novel's protagonist, Edna Pontellier, is faced with this consequence after she embarks on a journey of self-discovery. "As Edna's ability to express herself grows, the number of people who can understand her newfound language shrinks" (Ward 3). Edna's awakening from a conforming, Victorian wife and mother, into an emotional and sexual woman takes place through the use of self-expression in three forms: emotional language, art, and physical passion....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Birth, whether of children or desires, plays a strong motif throughout The Awakening. The four components of childbirth, which Edna—the novel’s main character—recalls as she witnesses her friend Madame Ratignolle give birth, represent major themes Chopin emphasizes throughout her novel. These four components are “ecstasy of pain, the heavy odor of chloroform, a stupor which had deadened sensation, and an awakening to find a little new life” (133). In childbirth, the first three components are necessary to achieve the fourth: the awakening to find a new life....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Essays]
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The Importance of Setting in The Awakening - The Importance of Setting in The Awakening              Setting is a key element in Chopin's novel, The Awakening   To the novel's main character, Edna Pontellier, house is not home. Edna was not herself when enclosed behind the walls of the Pontellier mansion. Instead, she was another person entirely-- someone she would like to forget. Similarly, Edna takes on a different identity in her vacation setting in Grand Isle, in her independent home in New Orleans, and in just about every other environment that she inhabits....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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The Character of Mademoiselle Reisz in The Awakening - The Character of Mademoiselle Reisz in The Awakening "She was a disagreeable little woman, no longer young, who had quarreled with almost everyone, owing to a temper which was self-assertive and a disposition to trample upon the rights of others." (25) This is how Kate Chopin introduces the character of Mademoiselle Reisz into her novel, The Awakening. A character who, because of the similarities she shares with Madame Pontellier, could represent the path Madame Pontellier’s life may have taken, had she survived old age....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1084 words
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The Awakening by Kate Chopin - The Awakening by Kate Chopin Kate Chopin is one of the first female writers to address female issues, primarily sexuality. Chopin declares that women are capable of overt sexuality in which they explore and enjoy their sexuality. Chopin shows that her women are capable of loving more than one man at a time. They are not only attractive but sexually attracted (Ziff 148). Two of Chopin’s stories that reflect this attitude of sexuality are The Awakening and one of her short stories “The Storm”. Although critics now acclaim these two stories as great accomplishments, Chopin has been condemned during her life for writing such vulgar and risqué pieces....   [tags: The Awakening American Literature Essays]
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