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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Awakening Self-Discovery"
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Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna’s Self Discovery in Chopin’s The Awakening She was fond of her children in an uneven, impulsive way. She would sometimes gather them passionately to her heart; she would sometimes forget them. The year before they had spent part of the summer with their grandmother Pontellier in Iberville. Feeling secure regarding their happiness and welfare, she did not miss them except with an occasional intense longing. Their absence was a sort of relief, though she did not admit this, even to herself....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 437 words
(1.2 pages)
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Theme of Self-discovery in The Awakening and A Doll's House - The Theme of Self-discovery in The Awakening and A Doll House       In Chopin's The Awakening and Ibsen's A Doll House, the main characters each experience an awakening. Although they lead different lives, Nora Helmer and Edna Pontellier's respective awakenings are caused by similar factors. From the beginning, neither character fits the standard stereotype of women in the society in which they lived. Another factor that influences Nora and Edna's awakenings is their marital relationship. Neither Nora nor Edna are treated as an equal by their husband....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1134 words
(3.2 pages)
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Identity and Society's Expectations In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Edna Pontellier’s suicide is an assertion of her independence and contributes to Chopin’s message that to be independent one must choose between personal desires and societal expectations. Chopin conveys this message through Edna’s reasons for committing suicide and how doing so leads her to total independence. Unlike the other women of Victorian society, Edna is unwilling to suppress her personal identity and desires for the benefit of her family. She begins “to realize her position in the universe as a human being and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her” (35)....   [tags: the awakening] 598 words
(1.7 pages)
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Edna’s Symbolic Swim in The Awakening - Edna’s Symbolic Swim in The Awakening Reading through The Awakening for the first time, a passage in chapter X intrigued me: Edna’s first successful swim. I begin my close reading halfway through page 49, “But that night she was like the little tottering, stumbling, clutching child, who of a sudden realizes its powers, and walks for the first time alone, boldly and with over-confidence.” Her success is sudden and in spite of assistance from “the men and women; in some instances from the children” throughout the summer....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 528 words
(1.5 pages)
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Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Birth in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Birth, whether of children or desires, plays a strong motif throughout The Awakening. The four components of childbirth, which Edna—the novel’s main character—recalls as she witnesses her friend Madame Ratignolle give birth, represent major themes Chopin emphasizes throughout her novel. These four components are “ecstasy of pain, the heavy odor of chloroform, a stupor which had deadened sensation, and an awakening to find a little new life” (133). In childbirth, the first three components are necessary to achieve the fourth: the awakening to find a new life....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Essays]
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2916 words
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symbolaw Symbols and Symbolism - Clothing as a Symbol in The Awakening - Use of Clothing as a Symbol in The Awakening In the novel, The Awakening, Kate Chopin takes Edna Pontellier on a journey of self-discovery. In doing this, she uses many symbols to show the relationship between Edna and the world. Clothing, or rather, the lack thereof, displays this relationship well. As Edna progresses throughout the novel, she discards more and more layers of the confining ìclothingî that surrounds her body and soul. By taking off her clothing, one piece at a time, she disobeys the rules that society has set for her, and in doing this, she exerts her independence....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 838 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Awakening - The Awakening is set in 1899, a time when the Industrial Revolution and the women's movement were just beginning, yet still overshadowed by the attitudes of society. Kate Chopin's idea that a woman’s needs were important was radical, especially since women were not considered independent, and women’s rights were just beginning to be fought. Edna's major conflict was her need for independence and personal fulfillment while still trying to conform to her traditional upbringing. Edna was expected to be a perfect wife and mother, both while vacationing on Grand Isle and living in New Orleans....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, Kate Chopin] 1030 words
(2.9 pages)
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Essay on The Awakening - Critical Views of The Awakening       The Awakening, written by Kate Chopin, is full of ideas and understanding about human nature. In Chopin's time, writing a story with such great attention to sensual details in both men and women caused skepticism among readers and critics. However, many critics have different views with deeper thought given to The Awakening. Symbolism, the interpretation of Edna's suicide, and awakenings play important roles in the analysis of all critics.   Symbolism in The Awakening is interpreted in many ways....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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728 words
(2.1 pages)
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Theme of Isolation in The Awakening - Theme of Isolation in The Awakening       One theme apparent in Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, is the consequence of solitude when independence is chosen over conformity. The novel's protagonist, Edna Pontellier, is faced with this consequence after she embarks on a journey of self-discovery. "As Edna's ability to express herself grows, the number of people who can understand her newfound language shrinks" (Ward 3). Edna's awakening from a conforming, Victorian wife and mother, into an emotional and sexual woman takes place through the use of self-expression in three forms: emotional language, art, and physical passion....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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785 words
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The Importance of Setting in The Awakening - The Importance of Setting in The Awakening              Setting is a key element in Chopin's novel, The Awakening   To the novel's main character, Edna Pontellier, house is not home. Edna was not herself when enclosed behind the walls of the Pontellier mansion. Instead, she was another person entirely-- someone she would like to forget. Similarly, Edna takes on a different identity in her vacation setting in Grand Isle, in her independent home in New Orleans, and in just about every other environment that she inhabits....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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2217 words
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Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening expresses the difficulty of finding a woman’s place in society. Edna learns of new ideas such as freedom and independence while vacationing in Grand Isle. Faced with a choice to conform to society’s expectations or to obey personal desires for independence, Edna Pontellier realizes that either option will result in dissatisfaction. Thus, Edna’s awakening in Grand Isle leads to her suicide. Edna’s awakening occurs during her family’s vacation in Grand Isle....   [tags: Kate Chopin Awakening Essays] 1346 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Awakening - The Awakening opens in the late 1800s in Grand Isle, a summer holiday resort popular with the wealthy inhabitants of nearby New Orleans. Edna Pontellier is vacationing with her husband, Léonce, and their two sons at the cottages of Madame Lebrun, which house affluent Creoles from the French Quarter. Léonce is kind and loving but preoccupied with his work. His frequent business-related absences mar his domestic life with Edna. Consequently, Edna spends most of her time with her friend Adèle Ratignolle, a married Creole who epitomizes womanly elegance and charm....   [tags: essays research papers] 1039 words
(3 pages)
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The Awakening, the author Kate Chopin - The Awakening of Feminism In the novella The Awakening, the author Kate Chopin depicts the life of a female protagonist named Edna Pontellier. Edna, a wife, a mother and socialite, refuses her societal roles impressed upon her by her husband and peers. Two key female relationships in this story act as a catalyst to Edna Pontellier’s awakening. Edna’s dramatic discovery of self defines her character throughout the novella, detailing her feministic view on the societal roles of Creole women during the late nineteen hundreds....   [tags: creole society, edna, feminism]
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936 words
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Edna Pontellier's Suicide in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna Pontellier's Suicide Suicide has been defined as "the act of self-destruction by a person sound in mind and capable of measuring his (or her) moral responsibility" (Webster 1705). Determining one's moral responsibility is what all of humanity struggles with and strives to achieve. Many forces act toward the suppression of this self-discovery, causing a breakdown and ultimately a complete collapse of conventional conceptions of the self. So then the question presented becomes whether or not Edna's suicide is an act of tragic affirmation or pathetic defeat....   [tags: Awakening Kate Chopin] 1574 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - The Awakening is set in 1899, a time when the Industrial Revolution and the women's movement were just beginning , conversely, still overshadowed by the attitudes of society in the 19th century. Kate Chopin's idea that a woman’s needs were important was somewhat radical, especially since women were not considered to be independent, and women’s rights were still being fought for. Edna's major conflict is her need for independence and personal fulfillment while still trying to conform to her traditional upbringing....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, Kate Chopin] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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Finding True Freedom in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Finding True Freedom in The Awakening  Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening details the endeavors of heroine Edna Pontellier to cope with the realization that she is not, nor can she ever be, the woman she wants to be. Edna has settled for less. She is married for all the wrong reasons, saddled with the burden of motherhood, and trapped by social roles that would never release her. The passage below is only one of the many tender and exquisitely sensory passages that reveal Edna’s soul to the reader....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1226 words
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The Critics View of Edna Pontellier’s Suicide in The Awakening - The Critics View of Edna's Suicide in The Awakening             There are many ways of looking at Edna's Suicide in The Awakening, and each offers a different perspective. It is not necessary for the reader to like the ending of the novel, but the reader should come to understand it in relation to the story it ends. The fact that readers do not like the ending, that they struggle to make sense of it, is reflected in the body of criticism on the novel: almost all scholars attempt to explain the suicide....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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2382 words
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feminaw Seeking a New Identity for Women in The Awakening - Seeking a New Identity for Women in The Awakening        In The Awakening, Chopin questions gender roles. Chopin seeks an identity for women that is neither wife nor mother. To achieve this end, she incorporates progressive feminist ideas into her writing. Yet, in the end, Chopin also shows that, because of years of conditioning, many women are unable to escape society’s stereotypical roles by any satisfactory means. The protagonist of the novel, Edna Pontellier, does not possess the skills needed to become independent and, despite attempts to escape, succumbs finally to the doomed dream of romantic love....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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1457 words
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feminaw Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna Pontellier, A Woman Ahead of her Time - A Woman Ahead of her Time in The Awakening   When she published The Awakening in 1899, Kate Chopin startled her public with a frank portrayal of a woman’s social, sexual, and spiritual awakening. Because it told its particular truth without judgment or censure, the public disapproved. The idea of a true autonomy for women, or, more astounding yet a single sexual standard for men and women — was too much to imagine. Kate Chopin’s presentation of the awakening of her heroine, Edna Pontellier, her unblinking recognition that respectable women did indeed have sexual feelings proved too strong for many who read her novel....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 673 words
(1.9 pages)
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Edna Pontellier as a Feminist in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - ... Streater weighs in on Edna’s situation and placement in society in her essay, “Adele Ratignolle: Kate Chopin's Feminist at Home in The Awakening” with the idea that, “Chopin reveals how women are being defined by a male construct of motherhood that not only denies their individual identity, but also continually reinforces a sense of inferiority, for what woman can measure up to the standard of an ‘angel’”. Because Edna is actually interested in exploring her individual identity, she instantly represents the opposite of what her society considers the ideal woman....   [tags: self, suicide, society]
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778 words
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Essay on The Awakening - In their analytical papers on The Awakening by Kate Chopin, both Elaine Showalter and Elizabeth Le Blanc speak to the importance of homosocial relationship to Edna’s awakenings. They also share the viewpoint that Edna’s return to the sea in the final scene of the book represents Edna being one with her female lover and finding the fulfillment she has been seeking. We see evidence of this idea of the sea as a feminine from Showalter when she tells us that “As the female body is prone to wetness, blood, milk, tears and amniotic fluid, so in drowning the woman is immersed in feminine organic element....   [tags: Kate Chopin, homosocial relationships]
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1620 words
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Nora's Discovery of Self in Ibsen's A Doll's House - Nora's Discovery of Self in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       Ibsen's play, "A Doll House," involves a woman who begins the play as a common housewife and through a series of joyous occurrences and catastrophes becomes a self-liberating woman.  Nora Helmer is transformed and decides to abandon her family and home in search of her true self.  She arrives at this point because of several factors.  Her refusal to submit to her husband and her self-realization is brought on by the way she has been taught to act by her husband and her father, and the contradicting demands the situations that she has had to deal with gave her.  Her true devotion to herself is discovered because of the false...   [tags: Dolls House essays Henrik Ibsen]
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The Awakening - The Awakening The novel, The Awakening by Kate Chopin, was written in the late nineteenth century in St. Louis after her husband Oscar died of a severe illness. Her book appeared in 1899, after she was idolized by many novels written by Darwin and Sarah Orne Jewett. Her first attempts at writing were just brief sketches for a local newspaper that was only short descriptions of her life in Louisiana. However, Chopin’s interests had always run along more risky lines, as reflected in her diaries, letters, and fictions....   [tags: essays research papers] 1484 words
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The Awakening - The Awakening is a story full of symbolism and imagery that can have many different meanings to the many who have read it. I have read several different theories on Kate Chopin’s meaning and though some are vastly different, they all seem to make sense. It has been said that Kate Chopin might have been ambiguous just for this reason. At some point, almost everyone struggles with knowing or not knowing their purpose in life, and therefore it seems, that on some level, most who read the story about Edna Pontellier can relate to her in some way....   [tags: Kate Chopin essays research papers] 2040 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Awakening - Edna Pontellier's so-called "awakening" is her realization that she is a disposable object in her environment, the patriarchal Creole society of the 19th century. She slowly recognizes in The Awakening that she has never been honest with herself about her true feelings and desires, and grows to understand that a woman in her lifetime will never be seen as an independent person capable of making decisions independently. However, her "awakening" is false; though she makes these realizations, she can not in the end handle her new vision of independent life, and continually places herself in the realms of male dominance by the situations she creates....   [tags: American Literature] 587 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Awakening - Edna Pontellier 	The Awakening, which was written by Kate Chopin, received a great deal of criticism when it was first published in 1899. Much of the controversy over the novel arose because of the character of Edna Pontellier. Edna was very much unlike the women of her time. In today's terms she would be considered a rebel. Edna opposed the traditional roles of society that kept many restraints on the women of the 1800's. According to traditional society of the 1800's women were assigned the duties of tending the home, caring for their husband, and bearing children....   [tags: essays research papers] 751 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Awakening - The Awakening “Edna began to feel like one who awakens gradually out of a dream, a delicious, grotesque, impossible dream, to feel again the realities oppressing into her soul.” (Pg. 42) In Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening the constant boundaries and restrictions placed on Edna Pontellier by society will lead to her struggle for freedom and her ultimate suicide. Her husband Leonce Pontellier, the current women of society, and the Grand Isle make it evident that Edna is trapped in a patriarchal society....   [tags: essays research papers] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Awakening - The Awakening In the book The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, Edna Pontellier is an unhappy, married, mother who finds an outlet from her life through a welcoming ocean. "A certain ungovernable dread hung about her when in water, unless there was a hand nearby that might reach out and reassure her."(p.27) Edna is frightened by the ocean and very overwhelmed by its massive strength. Then she learns to swim and becomes fascinated by what was once an intimidator. "How easy it is!" It is nothing."(p.27) Edna is very pleased with this new found joy; Edna is estatic over conquering her fear....   [tags: essays research papers] 757 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Awakening - The short novel, The Awakening, begins at a crisis in Edna Pontellier's life. Edna is a free-spirited and passionate woman who has a hard time finding means of communications and a real role as a wife and a mother. Edna finds herself desperately wanting her own emotional and sexual identities. During one summer while her husband, Leonce, is out of town on business, her frustration and need for emotional freedom leads to an affair with a younger man. Her search for identity and love leads her on a wild ride against society and tests her strengths to the end....   [tags: essays research papers] 789 words
(2.3 pages)
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Kate Chopins The Awakening - Kate Chopin's The Awakening In the story about Edna Pontellier a major theme is her omitted self discovery. In the story we can see how Chopin uses style, tone and content to make the reader understand how it was for a person challenging many of the beliefs of the society at the beginning of the twentieth century. I believe there are many points in the story that can be considered to be very relevant to the time it was written, expressing ideas of the approaching feminist movement and building up an awareness of what was happening to women and the forthcoming feminist movement....   [tags: essays research papers] 949 words
(2.7 pages)
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Janie from Their Eyes Were Watching God, Gatsby from The Great Gatsby, June from The Joy Luck Club, and Edna from The Awakening - Janie from Their Eyes Were Watching God, Gatsby from The Great Gatsby, June from The Joy Luck Club, and Edna from The Awakening In most of the world's greatest literature, there have been introduced countless courageous characters and triumphant victories. These characters have the power to father strength from distress and grow brave by reflection. Such characters as Janie from Their Eyes Were Watching God, Gatsby from The Great Gatsby, June from The Joy Luck Club, and Edna from The Awakening....   [tags: Watching Gatsby Joy Luck Awakening Essays] 1717 words
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - The Awakening is a story based around a woman, Edna Pontieller, during the nineteenth century that has decided that she is not like all the additional women in her life because she questions her life ambitions and dreams and realizes that she does not fit into the usual role of a wife and mother. The Awakening begins on Grand Isle, an island off the coast of Louisiana and then to the state of Louisiana and then the story ends on Grand Isle. This story focuses on metaphors, symbolism, difference and the personal struggles that a woman might face during the nineteenth century where men are the dominating force and women stay home to raise the children....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Summary]
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1237 words
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Freudian Psychoanalysis and the Awakening - Freudian Psychoanalysis and the Awakening Sigmund Freud, the preeminent, 19th century, European neurologist and psychologist, designed a theory he labelled “psychoanalysis,” a theory which would transcend all borders and integrate itself deeply into many facets of society. In fact, an American named Kate Chopin, wrote a book entitled The Awakening, which was published at the turn of the 19th century, in which this theory played an integral role in expressing the complexity, relevance, and growth of the main character....   [tags: Psychology, Literary Review]
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995 words
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The Awakening by Kate Chopin - Edna Pontellier in The Awakening by Kate Chopin begins the novel in a semiconscious state where she is living the role condemned to her by society of a mother and homemaker. Her progression from a passive woman to a passionate, independent female corresponds to the steps she takes in her “awakening”. As Edna lets go of societal principles and her stereotypical role in the world, Edna creates a new identity away from her family and embodies the “new woman”. She knows she cannot truly escape society which is why she ultimately submits to death....   [tags: edna pontellier, romantic illusion]
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1233 words
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The Awakening, by Kate Chopin - In Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening, Edna Pontellier abandons the responsibility of her children with the realization that she cannot be a good mother for them in a restricted and unfulfilled position. Her feelings suggest that the capricious nature of children cause them to dehumanize their mothers, ultimately turning the role of a mother-woman into one with no freedom; it is a suppressing relationship Edna will not allow herself to be a part of. Edna’s decision to leave her family reveals that she must pursue a path of freedom in contrast to a life where she lives to fulfill only the needs of others....   [tags: Book Summary]
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1612 words
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Use of Nature in Chopin's Awakening and Langston Hughes' Poems -       Langston Hughes and Kate Chopin use nature in several dimensions to demonstrate the powerful struggles and burdens of human life. Throughout Kate Chopin's The Awakening and several of Langston Hughes' poems, the sweeping imagery of the beauty and power of nature demonstrates the struggles the characters confront, and their eventual freedom from those struggles. Nature and freedom coexist, and the characters eventually learn to find freedom from the confines of society, oneself, and finally freedom within one's soul....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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2013 words
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Edna Pontellier's Awakening - Kate Chopin’s novel, The Awakening has been both criticized and praised since its time of publication in 1899. Its scandalous nature shocked the sophisticates of the time for its frank treatment of a sin so egregious as adultery; its lack of moral repercussions for the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, led many to believe that Chopin excused, if not condoned, the act. Because of this, the novel didn’t get the recognition and analysis it deserved until well after its publication. What seems like a simple story is truly much deeper; Chopin’s use of symbolism creates a much richer narrative that lends itself to much more personal reflection and thought on the part of the reader....   [tags: Character Analysis ]
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1151 words
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Symbol and Irony in The Awakening by Kate Chopin - ... “"Well, send him about his business when he bores you, Edna," instructed her husband as he prepared to leave.” (Chopin 1). Another example of irony is when Leonce comes back from his night of enjoyment and tries to wake Enda up to be his audience. Leonce gets annoyed when she does not give him her attention and here the voice of the story refers to Edna as him “sole object of his existence”. “He thought it very discouraging that his wife, who was the sole object of his existence, evinced so little interest in things which concerned him, and valued so little his conversation.” (Chopin 1)This is ironic because in a way, Leonce has a double standard of the roles of his wife Edna in the marr...   [tags: sexual aspirations, social rules] 761 words
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The Scarlet Letter - "She was ladylike, too, after the manner of the feminine gentility of those days; characterized by a certain state and dignity, rather than by the delicate, evanescent, and indescribable grace which is now recognized as its indication. And never had Hester Prynne appeared more ladylike, in the antique interpretation of the term, than as she issued from the prison. Those who had before known her, and had expected to behold her dimmed and obscured by a disastrous cloud, were astonished, and even startled, to perceive how her beauty shone out, and made a halo of the misfortune and ignominy in which she was enveloped" - this is almost the first description of the main heroine that the reader get...   [tags: Hester's Journey of Self-Discovery] 1093 words
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Scene Analysis - The Awakening - Edna had found her old bathing suit still hanging, faded, upon its accustomed peg. She put it on, leaving her clothing in the bath-house. But when she was there beside the sea, absolutely alone, she cast the unpleasant, pricking garments from her, and for the first time in her life she stood naked in the open air, at the mercy of the sun, the breeze that beat upon her, and the waves that invited her. How strange and awful it seemed to stand naked under the sky. how delicious. She felt like some new-born creature, opening its eyes in a familiar world that it had never known....   [tags: Kate Chopin] 937 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Awakening: Sexuality in Nineteenth Century Literature - Pleasure's a sin, and sometimes sin's a pleasure. George Gordon Noel Byron (The Daily Muse) Everyday the North American media sends millions of sexually provocative images through the airwaves and onto television screens. According to a recent study, an overwhelming 56% of all television programs contain sexual content (Vieth, 2). Our society has become so immune to the representation of sex that, for the most part, it goes unnoticed. Although concerns regarding sexuality still remain, society's tolerance level has changed dramatically over time....   [tags: American Literature] 1169 words
(3.3 pages)
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themeaw Themes and Fate in The Awakening and Madame Bovary - Themes and Fate in The Awakening and Madame Bovary         Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary are both tales of women indignant with their domestic situations; the distinct differences between the two books can be found in the authors' unique tones.  Both authors weave similar themes into their writings such as, the escape from the monotony of domestic life, dissatisfaction with marital expectations and suicide.  References to "fate" abound throughout both works.  In The Awakening, Chopin uses fate to represent the expectations of Edna Pontellier's aristocratic society.  Flaubert uses "fate" to portray his characters' compulsive methods of dealing with thei...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1286 words
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Controversial Gender Issues in Kate Chopin's "The Awakening" - "Nothing any longer is given, anyone can be anything" (Jehlen 271). American controversy is a continual process. The last year of the twentieth century boiled over with suspension of Y2K (a newly coined term for the new millennium that was worn out by year-end), everybody waited with anticipation for the world to coming cashing to a halt and when nothing happened everyone breathed a sigh of relief. Today, four short years later, Y2K seems to be a distant memory and now our plates are full with fresh new questions to occupy our minds....   [tags: American Literature] 1306 words
(3.7 pages)
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Gulliver's Travels: A Journey of Self-Discovery - Self -Discovery is acquiring knowledge about your identity which stems from a mixture of the people you associate with and the environment you're surrounded by. One of the underlying themes in Gulliver's Travels is the journey of self-discovery. Gulliver starts out his expedition as an ambitious, practical, and optimistic character who appreciates mankind however, by the end of the voyage he develops an overt hatred towards humanity. Because of Gulliver's surroundings, his outlook on mankind is cynical which leads to a shift of self-distinctiveness, an identity crisis, and an overall jaded mental state....   [tags: self-concept, human corruption]
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1231 words
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Sexual Self-Discovery in Fun Home by Allison Bechdel - Anguish and Pain In the graphic novel Fun Home, by Allison Bechdel, sexual self-discovery plays a critical role in the development of the main character, Allison Bechdel herself; furthermore, Bechdel depicts the plethora of factors that are pivotal in the shaping of who she is before, during and after her sexual self-development. Bechdel’s anguish and pain begins with all of her accounts that she encountered at home, with her respective family member – most importantly her father – at school, and the community she grew up within....   [tags: homosexual, self-development] 1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Discovery of the Self - Philosophy originates from the Latin words Philo and Sophia meaning 'love of wisdom'. This love of wisdom doesn't always come easy, and often students of philosophy will question everything they previously knew, but questioning is the precise purpose of philosophy. Sometimes the answers aren't always there, and everyone's answers are not the same; this is the joy of philosophy. An important aspect of philosophy is the aspect of the self. In the textbook Philosophies for Living, edited by Robert Timko and Joan Hoff, various authors provide contrasting sets of ideas and beliefs pertaining to the self....   [tags: Philosophy ] 1723 words
(4.9 pages)
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Knowing Self and Self Discovery - Knowing Self This semester, I had the privilege to experience unrestricted creativity in a structured writing class. Now, as I reflect upon the semester I come to realize how closed minded I really am. This semester, I was challenged as a student writer to draw upon something or find inspiration from within to constructively create a masterpiece with words. Often times, finding or even tapping into my creative nerve was very difficult. Then I came to realize, as a student writer, I am paralyzed by a concept called decision making....   [tags: creativity, writing, effect, leadership] 995 words
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Kate Chopin’s The Awakening - The Feminist Awakening - The Feminist Awakening   Women’s rights have evolved over time; beginning with being homemakers and evolving to obtaining professions, acquiring an education, and gaining the right to vote. The movement that created all these revolutionary changes was called the feminist movement. The feminist movement occurred in the twentieth century. Many people are not aware of the purpose of the feminist movement. The movement was political and social and it sought to set up equality for women. Women’s groups in the United States worked together to win women’s suffrage and later to create and support the Equal Rights Amendment....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening]
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Love and Self in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Love and Self in The Awakening                  Kate Chopin's The Awakening is often said to triumph the exploration on the emotional and sexual needs of women, and the novel certainly is about that to a great extent, but even more importantly, it is a quest for individuality and the meaning of love. Through the protagonist, Edna Pontellier, Chopin describes in her novel one woman's journey towards self-consciousness. Several stages of 'awakenings' can be detected on the road, which are discussed in detail, along with the themes of romantic love, possession and an individual self....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Awakening1 - Awakening1 THE AWAKENING The contrast between an urban and a tropical setting represents the awakening that the protagonist experiences in Kate Chopin's classic novel, The Awakening. At Grand Isle Edna becomes conscious of her restrictive marriage in a male dominated society. Her awakening originates with her experiences at Grand Isle but fully develops upon her return to the city, where she completes her transformation from her roles as wife and mother to an independent woman. The setting at the beginning of the novel is the Grand Isle, a popular Creole island resort....   [tags: essays papers] 1270 words
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Self-Actualization and Self-Discovery - ... For one, every other need must be met first (basic needs, safety needs, social needs, and esteem needs) and for another, it is very difficult to achieve this kind of personal awareness. It is said that it is an individual’s goal to reach the self-actualization section of the hierarchy, but usually getting there is disrupted because it is difficult to fully meet every other need before it. Maslow said that most people are content with not being able to reach that last part of the hierarchy because the fulfillment of social, physical, and emotional needs keep an individual satisfied, and self-actualization is not necessarily needed for survival....   [tags: developmental psychology]
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The Awakening: Self-Empowerment of Older Adults - ... I would like to relate a personal experience I recently had that I believe supports the importance of recognizing an individual’s worth, and acting in such a way so as to empower that person, instead of diminishing them. In my community there is a chorale group that performs for local nursing homes and assisted living facilities. They sing songs, they interact with the people attending their performances and they are very dedicated in the service work that they do. They are all seniors as well, in their late 60s, 70s and 80s....   [tags: Self-Empowerment, Control, Life, Self-Esteem]
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The Journey to Self Discovery - The Journey to Self Discovery Death and life are contrasting points of view while discovery seems to be the main point in Joan Didion’s essay “On Going Home and, N. Scott Momaday’s essay The Way to Rainy Mountain. For Joan Didion, returning home is a source of comfort, confusion, and conflict. The life she lives with her husband and child are a world apart from the life she grew up in. Her memories are a part of who she is and the kind of mother and wife she hopes to be. Perhaps in her quest, she will find the best parts of her to pour into her new life....   [tags: Literary Review] 1025 words
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A Journey Into Self Discovery - Devotion, Admiration, and Respect. These were all the qualities that Marlow possesses the beginning of his journey as he traveled into the Heart of Darkness. A devotion to his job and his European counterparts. Admiration to one of the best Ivory sells man in the Congo and respect for himself. Conrad shows us that these beliefs that Marlow once thought were true are slowly changing as he spends his days in the jungle. Watching as the Europeans treated the natives with no consideration or respect put much hatred inside Marlow’s heart for the pilgrims(92).Marlow’s change in attitude towards Kurtz changes drastically, as his love and deep admiration for the man has turns into disgust and regr...   [tags: Character Analysis] 587 words
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Grendel's Journey of Self-Discovery - A monster is a creature that deviates from normal or acceptable behavior; a threatening fore; something of unnatural deformity, malevolence, and cruelty. A hero, on the other hand, is one idealized for courage, bravery, and strength. While fusing the evermore different qualities of both would seem impossible, John Gardner’s Grendel does just that. Gardner creates an ambiguous character that possess aspects of both a monster and a hero – it is a force of evil, yet admired; it causes pain yet urges sympathy; and it is of irregular ugliness yet beloved....   [tags: monster, behavior, malevolence, hero]
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Self Discovery: The Gullah - The Gullah is a community that lives in the coastal parts of South Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia where they fish and farm. The ancestors of the Gullah trace back to Charleston, South Carolina, where there was a port for the Atlantic Slave trade, which was the most commonly used port in North America. Gullah is “more than simply the language and name of a people. It encompasses the essence of struggle, spirituality, perseverance and tradition” (South Carolina Business and Industry). Their relatives are West Africans who suffered many hardships and are honored and remembered by a rare preservation of African culture that the Gullah keeps alive....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Self Discovey in King Lear - Throughout recorded history, humans have deemed themselves superior to all other living creatures. The Bible, arguably the most influential work of literature extant, demonstrates human superiority in the excerpt, "Let us make man in our image...let them rule over the flesh of the sea and the birds of the air, over all the earth." This notion of superiority was especially evident during the Renaissance, a period categorized by the rebirth of thinking and knowledge. The Renaissance, which lasted from about 1300 to 1600, brought advances in science that clashed with traditional viewpoints on life and the universe....   [tags: History, Renaissance, Galileo, Catholic Church] 1653 words
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The Awakening by Kate Chopin - ... “What is it?” asked Pontellier…” (6-7). By deciding to swim at different times, Leonce and Edna are depicted as never reaching out to each other to try and understand each other, the only way they would be able to ensure an emotional bond. Moreover, the spot that Leonce should be filling in Edna’s heart as a husband is eventually replaced by Robert. It is this lack of pleasure from her husband which she finds in another man that sparks her self-awareness as she begins to question her role in society and crave autonomy....   [tags: society, self-awareness, edna] 1357 words
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The Significance of Art in Chopin's The Awakening - Edna seeks occupational freedom in art, but lacks sufficient courage to become a true artist. As Edna awakens to her selfhood and sensuality, she also awakens to art. Originally, Edna “dabbled” with sketching “in an unprofessional way” (Chopin 543). She could only imitate, although poorly (Dyer 89). She attempts to sketch Adèle Ratignolle, but the picture “bore no resemblance” to its subject. After her awakening experience in Grand Isle, Edna begins to view her art as an occupation (Dyer 85). She tells Mademoiselle Reisz that she is “becoming an artist” (Chopin 584)....   [tags: the awakening]
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growaw Edna Pontellier’s Search for Self in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - The Search for Self in The Awakening In The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, Edna Pontellier is a married woman with children. However many of her actions seem like those of a child. In fact, Edna Pontelliers’ life is an irony, in that her immaturity allows her to mature. Throughout this novel, there are many examples of this because Edna is continuously searching for herself in the novel. One example of how Edna¡¦s immaturity allows her to mature is when she starts to cry when LeƒVonce, her husband, says she is not a good mother....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 1146 words
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The Controlling Men of The Awakening - The Grand Isle society and inhabitants put great expectations on its women to belong to their men and be secondary to their children. Throughout Kate Chopin's dramatic novel The Awakening, she tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a woman who throughout the story tries to find herself using various different methods until it leads to her untimely demise. Kate Chopin tries to make the women look more as possessions rather than people. Edna Pontellier's society, therefore, flourishes with "mother-women," who "idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it to a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals" (12)....   [tags: Kate Chopin, The Awakening] 964 words
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Understanding Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening - Understanding Wolff’s Analysis of Chopin’s The Awakening “Un-Utterable Longing” analyzes The Awakening from the diverse, yet overlapping perspectives of deconstruction, feminist/gender theory, new historicism, and psychoanalytic criticism. Much like Yaeger and Treichler, Wolff attributes Edna’s struggle and eventual demise to her failed search for a language that voices her (un)womanly desires. Wolff first adopts the new historicist viewpoint to situate Edna as a 19th-century southern woman, presenting a very real conflict between: the dominating values of her time and place; and her own innermost passions and needs....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 857 words
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Edna’s Search for Solitude in Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna’s Search for Solitude in Kate Chopin's The Awakening Home from a summer at Grand Isle, separated from the company of an agreeable and, eventually beloved, companion and in the stifling company of a disagreeable, oblivious husband, Edna Pontellier sees her home, her garden, her fashionable neighborhood as "an alien world which had suddenly become antagonistic" (76). When she is left alone in the house, she thrills to the sensation of free time and space, the chance to explore, investigate, to see her house in its own light....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 1270 words
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growaw Kate Chopin's The Awakening - Edna Pontellier’s Awakening - Edna's Awakening in Kate Chopin's The Awakening       The society of Grand Isle places many expectations on its women to belong to men and be subordinate to their children. Edna Pontellier's society, therefore, abounds with "mother-women," who "idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it to a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals".  The characters of Adele Ratignolle and Mademoiselle Reisz represent what society views as the suitable and unsuitable woman figures....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Self Discovery in Breakfast of Champions - Self Discovery in Breakfast of Champions                               In Brandon Boyd’s Make Yourself he states that “ if [he] hadn’t assembled [himself] than [he] would’ve fallen apart,” implying that if one does not take the time to understand and build his or her own values and morals then one will live in confusion and falter. Throughout Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, Kilgore Trout goes through the process of realizing who he is and then learns to remain true to himself. At first Trout is a pessimist who strives to be heard....   [tags: Breakfast of Champions Essays] 642 words
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Self Discovery in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake - How does one go about discovering the veiled mysteries of oneself. First and foremost, what is the self. The self is who we are as an individual. It is the ethics, beliefs, values, opinions, thoughts, actions and everything that one does. Knowing oneself is also knowing what one desires out of life, ones goals and aspirations. External appearances have very little to do with the self. “Oryx and Crake” is a novel by Margaret Atwood that demonstrates how certain intriguing, distinctive characters develop themselves....   [tags: Oryx and Crake] 2269 words
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Self Discovery - Original Writing - Self Discovery - Original Writing Drifting slowly inside, she was in the middle of the crowd when the church bell rang. For some reason, she couldn't move any more. The ringing of the church bell suddenly became so hateful and unbearable. She stood still, until someone tapped on her shoulder, waking her up from the horrible "dream" that was flowing through her mind. She did not turn around, but hurried forward to join the crowd. She was not surprised by the enormous amount of people there....   [tags: Papers] 662 words
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Europe: The Land Of Self-Discovery - Europe: The Land Of Self-Discovery Every person has, in the course of his or her life, experienced some event that can be identified as life changing. This event can be an emotional enlightenment or a physical change that alters one’s mindset. Such a clarifying incident can happen at any time. However, I believe that such an event might not occur during the first eighteen years of a person’s life. Lucky for me, I have had an experience that I believe changed my outlook on life. The summer before my freshman year in college I went on a seven-week backpacking trip throughout the European continent....   [tags: Personal Narrative Traveling Essays] 1476 words
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Viewing God Through the Lens of Self-Discovery - Understanding the religious climate for American teenagers is a highly valuable sociological tool. Not only does it allow for a preview of the future, but it also affords the opportunity to serve as a measuring stick for the effectiveness of parenting. Studying teenage religiosity also reveals how well teens are able to articulate their personal beliefs, which can reveal the strength of their values. The majority of American teenagers are either some form of Christian or not religious at all (Smith and Denton Kindle Location 699)....   [tags: Religion]
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Self-Discovery and Exploration in The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho - ... This can lead to people thinking that they didn’t dream at all. In order for people to have a memory of their dream, they must at least have slept for 6-8 hours and must wake during the rapid eye movement cycle (HowStuffWorks). One theory is that dreams are our brain’s attempt to make sense of what would otherwise be meaningless random messages. Another theory would be that dreams are the brain firing signals as it organizes the previous day thoughts and experiences that may end up as a memory....   [tags: dreams, pyramids, omen] 1673 words
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Kate Chopin The Awakening - Kate Chopin The Awakening To what extent does Edna Pontellier, in Kate Chopin's The Awakening, mark a departure from the female characters of earlier nineteenth-century American novels The Awakening was published in 1899, and it immediately created a controversy. Contemporaries of Kate Chopin (1851-1904) were shocked by her depiction of a woman with active sexual desires, who dares to leave her husband and have an affair. Instead of condemning her protagonist, Chopin maintains a neutral, non-judgmental tone throughout and appears to even condone her character's unconventional actions....   [tags: Kate Chopin The Awakening Literature Papers]
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Selfless Self-Discovery Through Serving Others - Selfless Self-Discovery Some people go their whole lives without discovering who they really are and what they’re really capable of. Though the world contains many ways to go about finding oneself, the best way is through helping others. Influential civil rights leader and a beacon of hope to many, Mahatma Gandhi, once wrote, “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” The following reasons justify the importance self-discovery through this method: without helping others people would never know if they were a good person, would never find their priorities, and would never have their perspective on life altered....   [tags: priorities, perspective, community] 581 words
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The Discovery of The New World - I. Christopher Columbus: Christopher Columbus was born in Genoa in 1451. He was inspired by merchants and mariners. As a teenager, he joined the crew of a merchant ship. In his twenties, he settled in Lisbon with his brother, making maps for a living. Later on, he married a woman whose father had connections with the captains on Henry the Navigator’s ship. The couple settled in Madeira as Columbus visited multiple trading posts on the west coast of Africa. During his sailing trips, Columbus read some books that stimulated his curiosity, such as Natural History, written by Pliny....   [tags: Christopher Columbus, Expeditions, Discovery]
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Self-Discovery in Oates Naked - Self-Discovery in Oates Naked   While other, less accomplished writers use violence to shock or provoke, Joyce Carol Oates is usually more subtle and inventive. Such is the case in "Naked," the story of a forty-six year old woman whose placid outer identity is ripped away by a brutal assault while out hiking not far from her fashionable, University Heights neighborhood. Like many of Oates' stories—and in this regard she probably owes something to Flannery O'Connor—"Naked" focuses on a woman so entrenched in her rigid self-image that nothing short of violence could make her vulnerable to a humbling, though redemptive, self knowledge....   [tags: Oates Naked Essays]
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King Lear's Self Discovery - King Lear's Self Discovery      Although King Lear is an estimable monarch, as revealed by the devotion of men such as Kent, he has serious character flaws.  His power as king has encouraged him to be proud and impulsive, and his oldest daughters Regan and Goneril reflect that "The best and soundest of his time hath been but rash..." and that "he hath ever but slenderly known himself" (1.1.297-298, 295-296).  When Lear decides to divide his kingdom between his three daughters, Cordelia, Goneril, and Regan in order to have less responsibility in his old age, he creates a situation in which his eldest daughters gain authority over him and mistreat him.  Lear is unable to cope with his los...   [tags: King Lear essays]
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Self-discovery in Desolation Angels - Self-discovery in Desolation Angels Stripped to its barest essentials, Jack Kerouac's novel Desolation Angels reads as a drug-induced stupor of casual sex (or fantasies thereof), mixed into a melting of jazz and poetry. The often-adolescent urges of Kerouac's character Jack Duluoz, however, are mere episodes in the fast-paced, write-it-as-you-think-it, pre-literary notoriety phase in the life of a man who essentially founded the Beat generation. Though the overflowing stream of consciousness that comprises this book seems undoubtedly spontaneous, Desolation Angels actually examines, in a most straightforward and clearly organized manner, the state of human solitude....   [tags: Desolation Angels Essays] 900 words
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Janie's Self-Discovery - Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston is about a young woman that is lost in her own world. She longs to be a part of something and to have “a great journey to the horizons in search of people” (85). Janie Crawford’s journey to the horizon is told as a story to her best friend Phoebe. She experiences three marriages and three communities that “represent increasingly wide circles of experience and opportunities for expression of personal choice” (Crabtree). Their Eyes Were Watching God is an important fiction piece that explores relations throughout black communities and families....   [tags: Character Analysis]
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Essay on The Awakening - Criticism of The Awakening      Reading through all of the different criticism of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening has brought about ideas and revelations that I had never considered during my initial reading of the novel.  When I first read the text, I viewed it as a great work of art to be revered.  However, as I read through all of the passages, I began to examine Chopin’s work more critically and to see the weaknesses and strengths of her novel.  Reading through others' interpretations of her novel has also brought forth new concepts to look at again....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays]
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Freedom Awakening - “I would give my life for my children; but I wouldn't give myself” (62). Edna tries explaining to Madame Ratignolle that this is something she is just beginning to understand from herself. She does not know why but she cannot bring herself to give up herself for her kids. The author Kate Chopin, who wrote the book The Awakening, explains through her novel societies’ demands and wishes for a woman, such as Edna, with a family. The book takes place in the late 19th century in New Orleans. In this time period however, Edna must become the obedient wife and stay home to take care of her kids and her husband....   [tags: The Awakening, Kate Chopin]
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Symbolic Meaning of Edna’s Arms and Teeth in Chopin’s The Awakening - Symbolic Meaning of Edna’s Arms and Teeth in Chopin’s The Awakening Although characters’ personalities are described vividly in The Awakening through action, dialogue, and descriptions of clothing, little is presented of the characters physically. While Edna is alone in Madame Antoine’s house, resting, two moments occur in which specific aspects of her body are highlighted. Prior to this scene, it is known only that she is considered pretty and that her hair and eyes are a similar yellow-brown color....   [tags: Chopin Awakening] 614 words
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