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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Aristotle Poetics"
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The Poetics of Carol Muske and Joy Harjo - The Poetics of Carol Muske and Joy Harjo I began a study of autobiography and memoir writing several years ago. Recently I discovered two poets who believe that recording one’s place in history is integral to their art. Carol Muske and Joy Harjo are renowned poets who explore the intricacies of self in regards to cultural and historical place. Muske specifically addresses the poetics of women poets, while Harjo addresses the poetics of minority, specifically Native American, writers. Both poets emphasize the autobiographical nature of poetry....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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1618 words
(4.6 pages)
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Aristotle and The Politics - Philosopher and scientist, disciple of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great, acclaimed thinker and traveller in exile, it is nearly impossible to catch Aristotle in a defined denomination. It seems indeed that he lived several lives in one, experiencing fame and dishonour, starting from bottom to reach top but collapsing because of the people’s disapproval: the tragedy of the classic philosopher maybe. As a consequence his work is a reflection of his life: complex and incredibly diverse. Like a scientist he observed and dissected the world around him in many fields: from philosophical concepts with The Metaphysics to inanimate things in On Minerals via the structure of an ideal state in...   [tags: philosphy, science, hierarchy, justice, equality]
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2107 words
(6 pages)
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Aristorle: The Power Of The Intermediate - Everyone has strengths and weaknesses (things that people consider themselves to have an excess or deficiency of) and attempt to clearly define them. But rarely do people think about their “intermediates.” To Aristotle, the human characteristics that are possessed in a mean, or in an average amount, are where the true virtues lie. In order to truly utilize a virtue, there is a sort of balance that needs to be reached through good reasoning from practical wisdom. Virtue requires choices to be made about personal characteristics; every virtue can be excessive or scarce depending on the choices made by an individual....   [tags: W. D. Ross, Lesley Brown]
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1072 words
(3.1 pages)
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Aristotle - Aristotle With the possible exception of Plato, Aristotle is the most influential philosopher in the history of logical thought. Logic into this century was basically Aristotelian logic. Aristotle dominated the study of the natural sciences until modern times. Aristotle, in some aspect, was the founder of biology; Charles Darwin considered him as the most important contributor to the subject. Aristotle’s Poetic, the first work of literary notice, had a string influence on the theory and practice of modern drama....   [tags: essays research papers] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
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Who is Aristotle? - ... Without a brain to send signals to all parts of our body, we would be lifeless vegetables without the abilities to walk, talk, dream, or think for ourselves. Not to mention, the brain also must send signals to the heart commanding it to pump blood. Therefore, without the brain, or soul, to send signals to the heart to keep it beating, we would not be alive. Another great belief of Aristotle was “Virtue as the Golden Mean”. He believed that, “Human passions are capable of inciting a wide range of action, from too little to too much.” Basically, what Aristotle meant is that humans tend to choose one side, when in all reality, we should be choosing a middle ground between two choices....   [tags: greatest philosophers, human nature] 747 words
(2.1 pages)
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Aristotle On Friendship - Aristotle wrote on many subjects in his lifetime but one of the virtues that he examines more extensively is friendship. Aristotle believes that there are three different kinds of friendship: utility, pleasure, and virtuous friendships. He also argues that a real friendship should be highly valued because it is a complete virtue and he believes it to be greater than honor and justice. Aristotle suggests that human’s love of utility and pleasure is the only reason why the first two types of friendships exist....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek Philosophers] 1342 words
(3.8 pages)
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Descartes and Aristotle - People live life one day at time with the same guidance from their ancestors, and they often question their existence in the universe and try to understand the world around them. People often question their existence in the universe. Philosophers try to answer questions that most people will not think of in their daily lives. Most philosophers try to get to the truth of logical questions through epistemology. Epistemology is a “branch of philosophy that studies the nature and possibility of knowledge” (Soccio)....   [tags: Rationalism, Priori, Posteriori, Philosophers]
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1353 words
(3.9 pages)
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Aristotle and Plato - Political society today, has taken many lessons from Plato and Aristotle’s political ideas. As was the case in Ancient Greece, there are many different political ideologies and regimes that will may serve the purpose for one society, but in another, could cause utter chaos. Aristotle attributed the need for there being a number of political regimes due to the fact that there are “many parts to a city.” (4.3.1) The many parts to a city that he was referring to, simply enforces the necessity of having different forms of office for each of these parts....   [tags: Government, Ancient Greece, Thinkers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Aristotle on Friendship - ... As a result, these friendships are coincidental. Friendships of utility have no real love of friendship, thus the friendship is incomplete. These types of friendships easily dissolve “when the friends do not remain similar [to what they were]; for if someone is no longer pleasant or useful, the other stops loving him” (1156a20). The people in friendships of utility are never really friends of each other, but of what was expedient for them. Often times what is useful in this type of friendship does not remain the same, but is rather different from time to time....   [tags: Nicomachean ethics, philosophical analysis] 1080 words
(3.1 pages)
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Metaphysics by Aristotle - Limitless Possibilities “All men by nature desire to know” (Aristotle, “Metaphysics”). Famous scientists such as Aristotle, who is said to be the originator of biological studies, performed experiments on living animals that gave mankind the basis of anatomy. Animals such a pigs and goats were first used to practice surgeries before applying them to humans. From there, humans have begun to test other operations and drugs on both living and nonliving animals. Evidence of experiments and dissections done on animals can be seen as far back as 500 BC.Without animal testing, many of the medicines humans use today for basic survival such as the insulin used for diabetics would not exist....   [tags: animal testing, animal research]
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1486 words
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Plato, Artistotle and Thucydides - ... He argues that for a government to function well, leaders must use the human nature to persuade average thinkers of Athens that what they were saying was good for everyone. However, he sees it as an avenue for speaker to pursue their own interest. For this reason, he sees human natures having slight deception and ill will. He felt that people whopossess least of these human nature shortcomings that must riseto the position of leadership and authority (Dover, Thucydides: 11b, 21-23). The two philosopher clearly differs on their view ofdemocracy....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 1945 words
(5.6 pages)
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The Life and Achievements of Aristotle - Aristotle was born in 384 BC. In Stagira, a small town northern Greece. He had one older brother and one sister. His father, Nicomachus, was a doctor. His mother, Phaestis, came from the island of Euboea. She was wealthy. Owning a house which later remained in the family after she married Nicomachus. There are hardly any personal details of Aristotle because he lived so long ago. The little details we know are mostly from a Greek Historian named Diogenes Laertius. In his book he said that Aristotle had a lisp when he spoke and had small eyes....   [tags: biography, philosophy, philosopher, Greek] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics - Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle then describes steps required for humans to obtain the ultimate happiness. He also states that activity is an important requirement of happiness. A virtuous person takes pleasure in doing virtuous things. He then goes on to say that living a life of virtue is something pleasurable in itself. The role of virtue to Aristotle is an important one, with out it, it seems humans cannot obtain happiness....   [tags: ancient Greek phylosophy]
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2039 words
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Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics - ... To achieve this topic, I have sectioned my paper into three main sections, in which I have subsections supporting. In the first section, I will provide much information about Aristotle and his beliefs in virtue and obtaining happiness. Using information from his book of ethics I will provide examples and quote on quote statements to support his views. In the second section, I will provide my agreements as to why I relate and very fond of Aristotle’s book of Nicomachean Ethics. In the third section, I will provide research as to why there are such objections to Aristotle’s book of ethics, and counter act as to why I disagree with them....   [tags: human goal, happiness] 787 words
(2.2 pages)
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Examining the Ethics of Plato and Aristotle - This essay will be examining the ethics of Plato (428-347 BCE) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C). I will firstly attempt to summarise the five fundamental concepts of Plato and Aristotle before providing my own opinion and view on their ethics. I will concentrate on their theories on the good life as a life of justice, censorship, knowledge and the good life. I will first examine Plato’s ethics. Plato was a philosopher who was both a rationalist and absolutist. According to his view, people must be schooled to acquire certain kinds of knowledge i.e....   [tags: Philosophy] 1064 words
(3 pages)
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The Aristotle's Idea of a Good Life - Question: What is Aristotle’s idea of a good life and why does he view a good life in this way. Is Aristotle’s understanding of a good life accurate. Why or why not. (Make sure to talk about the concept of the mean). To Aristotle leading a good life, for the most part, means fulfilling one’s purpose in a way that is good by balancing life’s pleasures. In order to determine if an object fulfills its function in a good way, we must first consider the object. If we were to agree that a car should be reliable, then we could also agree that reliable car should be considered a good car....   [tags: happiness, life's pleasures, good human]
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1047 words
(3 pages)
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Aristotle on the Nature of Happiness and Virtue - ... It is the exercise of virtue, which Aristotle explains that it’s something you work for it, you are not happy just for five minutes, we have to work and sacrifice that virtue to reach happiness. It cannot be achieved until the end of one’s life, there’s no short cut to it, and human happiness depends on the exercise of his reason. Acquiring a moral character, I believe it’s one of the most important things, happiness depends a lot on it; we will not achieve happiness just only by enjoying the pleasure of the moment, we need to make the right choices, and this involves keeping our eye on the future....   [tags: happiness, central purpose, people's lives] 1280 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Ethics of Plato and Aristotle - This essay will be examining the ethics of Plato (428-347 BCE) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C). I will firstly attempt to summarise the three fundamental concepts of Plato and Aristotle before providing my own opinion and view on their ethics. I will concentrate on their theories on the good life as a life of justice, censorship and knowledge. Plato was a philosopher who was both a rationalist and absolutist. According to his view, people must be schooled to acquire certain kinds of knowledge, for example, mathematics, philosophy and so forth....   [tags: Philosophy] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Ideal Governments of Plato and Aristotle - In Ancient Greece, people known as philosophers began contemplating the world in a different light. They had a different way of thinking than what was normal in the day. While others practiced paganism and worshipped the Gods of Olympus, philosophers thought about the body, the soul, and ways to create a better world. Greek philosophers are still known today and their works are still being read and taught. They have left a mark on this world. One topic that philosophers frequently discuss is politics and government....   [tags: ancient greece, philosophers]
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1319 words
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Review of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics - Aristole’s Nichomachean Ethics is a critically acclaimed piece of literature that has laid the framework for philosophy as we know it today. It is considered to be a historical piece that was the first to address ethics in a unified, clear, and concise manner. The book was translated by F. H. Peters with an introduction by Hye-Kyung Kim. Aristotle was one of the great early philosophers who ventured to speak to humans about how they conducted themselves as they related to others; however, some of Aristotle’s ideologies were debated by his counterparts for hundreds of years....   [tags: Greek Philosophy, All The President's Men] 1379 words
(3.9 pages)
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Aristotle and Hobbes on the Nature of Man - ... May Hope states almost the same thing from the book “Aristotle's Ethics: Moral Development and Human Nature.” She along with the arguments of Sparague states that Aristotle’s theory that human good, can be seen to drew attention to the fact that humans, like human organs have a function to do in this life time. Therefore both writers say that Aristotle is stating that Human Nature is commonly good nature, but every man has a reason for their actions. Therefore the character from the novel Lord of the Flies that best fits Aristotle’s theory is Simon....   [tags: natural philosophy] 834 words
(2.4 pages)
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Aristotle, Alexander the Great, and Augustus - ... Although Aristotle wasn’t always right, (he believed the universe was eternal) his views were revolutionary and groundbreaking, and the effects of most of them can still be felt today. 4) Alexander the Great Alexander the Great, a student of Aristotle, was one the greatest military geniuses ever, and built a, “Macedonian-Greek empire that extended from the mainland of Greece to modern-day India” (Patterns, 105). Alexander succeeded his father Phillip in 336 BCE after he was assassinated by a Macedonian and took charge of his empire when he was only 20....   [tags: History, Leaders]
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824 words
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Aristotle's Three Motivations For Friendship - Aristotle identifies three motivations for friendship: usefulness, pleasure and good. He postulates that when people seek friendship, they look for someone who is worthy of their affection based on one of those three motives. Whether his argument is true is debatable. Many might object to this simplification of such a complex topic. However, his theory holds weight within the context of Book VIII. Friendships based on two people’s usefulness to each other are considered by Aristotle to be the lowest form of friendship (Aristotle 220)....   [tags: Ethics, Philosophy]
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891 words
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Aristotle on Happiness and Virtue - ... Aristotle’s work maintained practicality, which made a huge impact on upcoming moral philosophers. St. Thomas Aquinas and most of the other Christian philosophers were highly influenced by Aristotle’s work. Those people following the “Virtue Ethics" movement in the current era were, in fact, inspired by Aristotle himself. Arête & Eudaimonia The dictionary meaning of the Greek word ‘Eudaimonia’ is happiness. More accurately it means "living well” and "excellence". According to Aristotle, to achieve happiness is the ultimate goal of human life and it is the maximum goal (Carreras, 2011)....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers]
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1737 words
(5 pages)
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The Regimes Presented by Plato and Aristotle - Britannica defines a political system as “the set of formal legal institutions that constitute a ‘government’ or a ‘state’”.1 As the preceding definition implies, a political system is a large component of every government or state. Plato finds that each type of political system possesses a complementary constitution which governs a person’s body and soul (Republic 8.544e). Likewise, Aristotle observes that examples of each political system can also be found in households and communities (NE VIII.10, 1160b)....   [tags: Comparative Analysis, Political System] 1301 words
(3.7 pages)
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Aristotle: Ethics and the Virtues - Aristotle's ethics consist of a form of virtue ethics, in which the ethical action is that which properly complies with virtue(s) by finding the mean within each particular one. Aristotle outlines two types of virtues: moral/character virtues and intellectual virtues. Though similar to, and inspired by, Plato and Socrates’ ethics, Aristotle's ethical account differs in some areas. Aristotle, a student of Plato, is known for his contributions in many fields of philosophy, ethics being one of the most prominent....   [tags: Virtue Ethics, Nicomachean Ethics]
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2252 words
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Aristotle's Notion on Eudaimonia and Virtue - In Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics he accounts that humans should make sacrifices and should ultimately aim first and foremost for their own happiness . In the paper I will argue that it is really in a person’s best interest to be virtuous . I will do this by first describing Aristotle’s notion on both eudaimonia and virtue , as well as highlighting the intimate relationship between the two . Secondly I will talk about the human role in society. Thirdly I will describe the intrinsic tie between human actions ....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1551 words
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Expanding Beyond Philosophy: Aristotle - ... Many say Aristotle is the person behind all of the success of Alexander the Great. Aristotle’s childhood friend King Phillip II of Macedonia asked Aristotle to supervise his son Alexander’s education. At the time future Alexander the Great was only 13. Sources range from how long he actually tutored Alexander for; the time periods vary from three all the way to twelve years. While teaching Alexander, Aristotle taught philosophy, Government, politics, poetry, drama, and science. After Alexander came to power Aristotle kept in touch with him....   [tags: influnential, accomplishment, intelligent, system] 927 words
(2.6 pages)
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A Brief Biography of Aristotle - Aristotle Born in 384 B.C. in Stagira, Greece, little did the world know that there would be such great teachings, philosophies, theories, and laws to come all from this one person: Aristotle. Aristotle contributed to so many of societies biggest questions, wonders, and even fears. He worked with several other extremely significant philosophers of the past, and still well known today, much like Aristotle. He has made huge impacts that are still widely felt throughout modern society, in spheres such as political, scientific, and social....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers]
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1121 words
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Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean - ... There are two kinds of virtues: the moral virtues, perfecting desire (who submits to reason) for the action, and intellectual virtues, perfecting the intellect alone, for contemplation. Let's begin with moral virtue; is it possible to teach virtue. Is it enough to know the good to do it. Obviously not. Aristotle argues that knowing the good is not yet doing it, because the reason is confronted by the desire, who rebels and resists. We must therefore form the desire from the good, exercise it, and shape it....   [tags: virtue, moral law, consequence]
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518 words
(1.5 pages)
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Aristotle: The Pursuit of Happiness - Aristotle and Plato both are both well known for their focus on defining the purpose of being human. To them, humans have a particular characteristic that no other living thing possesses. That characteristic is that humans strive to achieve a level of goodness. Although they agree with each other that there is a highest good one must achieve in order to live a fulfilling life, they have different ideas on what that good is. On Aristotle’s search to find the highest good of a human being, he first asked what the ergon, or task, of being human is....   [tags: plato, human being, philosophy]
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1374 words
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Democracy Outlined by Plato and Aristotle - In the fifth-century BC, Athens emerged as one of the most advanced state or polis in all of Greece. This formation of Athenian ‘democracy’ holds the main principle that citizens should enjoy political equality in order to be free to rule and be ruled in turn. The word ‘democracy’ originates from the Greek words demos (meaning people) and kratos (meaning power) therefore demokratia means “the power of the people.” The famous funeral speech of Pericles states that “Our constitution is called democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people.” However, only citizens (free adult men of Athenian descent) could participate in political matters....   [tags: democracy, athens, greece]
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920 words
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Form and Matter in Aristotle - Aristotle defined nature “as an internal origin of change or stability”1. Natural substances are things such as animals, plants and inanimate matter like earth, water, fire and air. Each natural substance according to Aristotle has its own nature, which is what gives rise to its natural behaviour/characteristic. The nature of a natural substance is its inner principle/source of change.2 Therefore natural substances are capable of motion i.e. growing, gaining qualities, losing them and lastly being born and dying....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1584 words
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Aristotle, Rousseau and Descartes on Technology - While it is relatively easy to confuse the ideas of Aristotle, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and René Descartes, ancient philosophy, eighteenth century politics, and mathematics all appear to be considerably disconnected subjects. Associated with these divisions are three different opinions on a common subject matter: technology. It appears that Rousseau directly opposes technology, Aristotle’s opinion rests in the middle but also shares similarities with Rousseau, and Descartes favors technology. After reading Rousseau’s Discourse On the Origin of Inequality, Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics and Descartes’s The Discourse on Method, one can draw these conclusions....   [tags: phylosophical ideas]
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1337 words
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The Virtue of Generosity by Aristotle - In Nicomachean Ethics, generosity is the third virtue Aristotle examines. He directly addresses the idea of generosity to be the mean of wealth, meaning anything whose worth is measured by money. As presented by Aristotle, generosity is the intermediate of wastefulness and ungenerosity, wastefulness being the excess and ungenerosity being the deficiency. This virtue however, does not come naturally; generosity can arise through habit and takes experience as well as time. While generosity appears to be an important virtue, it is not the most essential virtue to one’s well being....   [tags: wastefulness, habit, perfect] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
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Conversation Between Plato and Aristotle - Dialogue Between Plato and Aristotle 2 As students file into the auditorium of the Academy the first thing that we all notice is the two professors that were standing at the front of the room. After all the students were seated that is when the first professor stepped forward to address the class. Plato: Good Morning Students. Students: Good Morning Professor. Plato: Many of you may know who I am and then there are those of you that do not. For those of you that do not know who I am, my name is Plato....   [tags: Knowledge, Philosophy] 741 words
(2.1 pages)
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A Tragic Hero According to Aristotle - Tragic Heroism: In Sophocles’ play Antigone, the character of Creon exemplifies a tragic hero more than the characters of Antigone or Medea because he experiences a fall from grace and his prosperous position, possesses a tragic flaw, and accepts the responsibility of his actions in a way that does not blame anyone and “shows enlightenment and growth”, all in accordance with Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero. (“Connections: A Theory,” 2000). In the play Antigone, Creon falls from grace and loses everything, which is an important aspect of Aristotle’s tragic hero definition....   [tags: Sophocles, Antigone, Analysis]
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1068 words
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Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean - In this essay we will discuss and analyze Aristotle’s Doctrine of the Mean. This topic area can be found in Book II, page 888, 6—15, through 890, 25. The purpose for Aristotle touching on this subject matter was to discern the states of character which are virtuous from those which are not. By this, I mean he is attempting to categorize which virtues are causal of a human “to be in a good state and to perform their functions well”(888—15). In order to keep this paper orderly and comprehensible, we will work in chronological order through Aristotle’s variety of premises and conclusions which lead to his main idea which is ––––––––––––....   [tags: virtues, philosophical analysis] 1255 words
(3.6 pages)
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Aristotle and Plato "Ideal Government" - ... This system was similar to the one that we have now. The juror had an opinion, but due to the fact that it could sometimes become rowdy they only had an option of yes or no to say whether they were guilty or not. They also had to vote right away and never had the chance to talk about it before they voted like we have the chance of doing in today's society. Though citizens in the Juror were allowed to informally talk amongst themselves which is why they could also get very rowdy and sometimes prosecution was difficult to accomplish....   [tags: philosophy, theories, democracy] 1297 words
(3.7 pages)
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Aristotle's Argument of the Polis - ... In the same vein, Aristotle proceeds, when a collection of villages is established, and these come to from a single complete community of great size, practically capable of being self-sufficient to a full degree, the polis or the city-state is thus said to come into existence. Here, Aristotle draws a fundamental distinction between the coming to be and the preservation of the city-state; that is, whereas the polis is formed for the sake of living, it “remains in being for the sake of living well” (1252B27-30)....   [tags: argument analysis, philosophy] 1743 words
(5 pages)
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Plato and Aristotle's Impact on Rhetoric - Plato and Aristotle are two rhetoricians than had a great impact on the history of rhetoric. Although they were similar in many ways, their use and definition of rhetoric were different. Plato had the more classical approach where he used rhetoric as a means of education to pass down his beliefs and practice of rhetoric to his students. He believed that it should be used to educate the masses, provoking thought, and thereby preserving that knowledge. Plato thought that rhetoric should be used to convey truth, truths already known to the audience, revealed through that dialectic critical thought....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 1491 words
(4.3 pages)
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On the Nature of Man by Aristotle -  Airs Waters and Places: Aristotle attributed the environment as a role to disease. This was an addition to the four humors from his work: On the Nature of Man. An Example is of people of the north whom were attributed to having phlegmatic properties due to their location and winter elements. People of Africa attributed to people of bile due to there how climate like that of the summer elements. Air, waters and places allowed the thought of the environment to be attributed to an illness. This theory allowed for better diagnosis of the actual cause of an illness and better treatment by knowing ones environment and culture....   [tags: airs waters, materia medica] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
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Aristotle on Ethics and Virtues - For Aristotle understanding ethics helps each one pursue a good life. What we need in order to understand ethics and live well is to appreciate the goods in life. Aristotle then explains why these qualities are essential in any fully well-live life. Virtues, the excellence of fulfillment, are the train to true happiness. One will become virtuous in character in time by acting virtuously. Virtues are not inborn, humans are only born with the capacity to become wise and ethically virtuous, and therefore, practice is required....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 722 words
(2.1 pages)
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Aristotle's Influences on Biology - Science has taken huge steps to get to where it is today. Throughout the ages biology has developed from focusing on medicine and natural history, to great scientific advantages such as the theory of evolution, classifying living organisms and decoding every strand of DNA in the human body. Biology is the study of life, and all living organisms. The first known biologists were Hippocrates of Kas and Galen of Pergamum, who helped with the understanding of anatomy and physiology. Philosophy is the study of a basis of a particular branch of knowledge or experience....   [tags: mathematics, academy, physics] 527 words
(1.5 pages)
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Kant's and Aristotle's Ethics - To be good is good but it has to be done for the right reason. Aristotle and Kant are two famous philosophers who have different ethical theories. The theory’s of virtue and duties rest not only on laws and obligations but from what comes from the inside. Morality comes from inner strength, character and how we live our life to the best end. Aristole 384-322 b.c.e. Aristotle conceptualized the branches of philosophy and contributed to the theories in logic, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy (book 237)....   [tags: Philosophy, Philosophers]
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1297 words
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Aristotle's Rhetoric in Allstate Ads - Every year, companies spend billions of dollars in advertising in hopes to persuade consumers to buy their product. Companies use Aristotle’s approaches of Rhetoric; which use ethos, logos, and pathos. According to “The Allstate Corporation,” The Allstate Corporation is the second largest property and casualty insurance company, by premiums, in the United States” (The Allstate Corporation). Writer Stuart Elliott, supposed that in the first quarter of last year, Allstate spent $85.9 billion in advertising (Elliott)....   [tags: Advertising]
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1223 words
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Jesus and Aristotle Dialogue - ... (Edel, 125) Jesus: What is the scientific method. Aristotle: The scientific method is a system of reason that helps one understand the world in greater depth. It consists of problems, hypotheses, experimentation, and appropriate conclusions. The rational mind has analytical power. (Edel, 126) Jesus: Yes, humans do have analytical power because God gave us free-will. With that privilege, philosophers like you tend to form your own hypotheses and look for buried answers. In actuality, there is no need for that....   [tags: athens, religious people, god] 1151 words
(3.3 pages)
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Plato Vs. Aristotle on Art - For over two thousand years, various philosophers have questioned the influence of art in our society. They have used abstract reasoning, human emotions, and logic to go beyond this world in the search for answers about arts' existence. For philosophers, art was not viewed for its own beauty, but rather for the question of how art and artists can help make our society more stable for the next generation. Plato, a Greek philosopher who lived during 420-348 B.C. in Athens, and Aristotle, Plato’s student who argued against his beliefs, have no exceptions to the steps they had to take in order to understand the purpose of art and artists....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1982 words
(5.7 pages)
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Philosophical Analysis of Aristotle - Philosophical analysis of Aristotle Many theorists consider Aristotle to be the first person to use the term “ethics” in naming the field of study that had already been subject to develop by his predecessors Socrates and Plato. Philosophical ethics attempts in offering the rational response to the questions regarding how the human beings live. Aristotle used to be regarding politics and ethics as two related but very separate field of study because ethics examines the good concerning an individual, while politics is about examining the good of the city-state....   [tags: socrates, plato, greek]
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875 words
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Aristotle's Concept of Happiness - In the work, Nicomachean Ethics, the philosopher Aristotle creates a guideline for those who are serious about pursuing happiness. Aristotle's recommendations for finding happiness are not accepted today without some struggle and careful examination. In Aristotle's time, slaves, women and children were not truly considered human; so in many cases the philosopher is directing his words towards free males only. It is necessary to understand that by overlooking this discrimination and applying it to all people, one can discover the timeless wisdom of Aristotle....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1089 words
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Aristotle: The Rule of Law - A. Explain what is meant by the concept of “the rule of law” According to Aristotle, "The rule of law is better than that of any individual”, suggesting every member of society, even a ruler, must abide by and follow the law. The rule of law is linked to the principle of justice, meaning that everyone within a society (including both private citizens and government officials) are subject to the law, and that those laws are administered fairly and justly. The intention of the rule of law is to protect against arbitrary governance....   [tags: society, judicial power, legislative power]
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Aristotle’s Theory of Motion - The scientist Aristotle (384-322 BCE) developed many important theories which modern day physics is based upon. One of these theories is Aristotle’s theory of motion. Through his research Aristotle attempted to provide explanations as to how objects in our universe moved. While many of his theories have been since proven to be inaccurate, they provided a basis for future theories which eventually lead to our present day understanding of motion. To understand Aristotle’s overall theory of motion you must first understand his classification of matter....   [tags: physics, force, false]
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Aristotle's Balance of Eudaimonia - ... Additionally, he believed that ‘the good to humans is the maximum realization of a functioning that was unique to humans’ (Haslip). This shows his view of the important of logic and reasoning well. On the other hand, Aristotle saw the political influence of functioning well (HappyBird House). He believed with the view of Plato that Polis involves in the amount of happiness. It is a natural organization in which its main goal is to achieve happiness for citizens .It is considered natural for that one's true self and nature could be fully demonstrated in community....   [tags: philospohical analysis] 891 words
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​Aristotle's Life and Work - ​Aristotle's work during his (384-322 B.C.E) lifespan had great impact on society in his time and even today, he is ranked among the greatest philosophers of all time. He was a world-class researcher and writer covering many topics and his theories have provided illumination, met with resistance, created debate, and generally stimulated the continued interest of abiding readership. His philosophical influence shaped centuries of philosophy from Late Antiquity (284-632 A.D.) through Renaissance (1450-1600 A.D.) and is still studied today with non-antiquarian interests....   [tags: philosopher, greek, axioms] 994 words
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - An Exposition of Aristotelian Virtues In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle explores virtues as necessary conditions for being happy. A virtuous person is a person with a disposition toward virtuous actions and who derives pleasure from behaving virtuously. Aristotle distinguishes between two types of human virtue: virtues of thought and virtues of character. Virtues of thought are acquired through learning and include virtues like wisdom and prudence; virtues of character include bravery and charity, which are acquired by habituation and require external goods to develop....   [tags: virtue, action, happiness]
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics: Courage As I read Aristotle’s book "Nicomachean ethics," I analyzed and comprehend his thoughts on all ten books. I came to realization that Aristotle thoughts throughout the book are difficult to express and clearly comprehend. But though it was difficult to breakdown, I could clearly see that it was written to determine what a human being is as a whole. To begin with, Aristotle tells us his meaning of virtues and vices. They are not just any habits that we experience, but the outcome of what we feel as pleasure or pain....   [tags: courage, virtue, philosophy] 565 words
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Aristotle's Perception of Society - Aristotle believes that money is a form of justice, and not an end in itself. This has been a controversial perception amongst people for many years; some tend to agree while others have a different belief. From my point of view, Aristotle’s belief was not arbitrary. I support this belief because unfortunately our society is continuously being corrupted by many people who possess the money, wealth, and influence in our current days, are using their means to promote injustice. It is also true among modern thinkers that money might also be the only way to justice....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas - Introduction Critics have for a long time argued that there is no way that philosophy and religion can come together. In their argument, they find many a religious group conflicting with the sound doctrine purported by the philosophy arena. For those who have tried to harmonize the two disciplines, they have been met with complex questions on the authenticity and their grounds of arguments. However, the works of ancient (middle-age philosophers) and religious thinkers and scholars has had challenges too but there are two outstanding works that have gained credit from most, if not all, of the scholars and modern philosophers....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Aristotle's Four Main Causes - To some the causes and effects of things are mutually exclusive, and coexistence with one another. When observing specific equipment or even life, the question stands that there must be an account that took place before such items ceased to exist. Particularly, Aristotle argues that each thing, whatever it may be, will have causes, or types of explanatory factors by which that thing can be explained. The significant knowledge of causes allows for specific accounts to be known. It’s like questioning what occurred first the chicken or the egg....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - Many believe the two are interchangeable when speaking about morals and ethics, when the two in no way mean the same thing. Morals are subjective beliefs that belong to an individual, they are one’s own beliefs as to what is right and what is wrong. Ethics on the other hand are the rules that society creates and teaches regarding proper and improper, right and wrong, social behavior. Morals are internal, ethics are external, and they have been the unwritten rules of society as old as mankind, which govern proper social conduct based on the greater good of the popular belief....   [tags: morals, kant, gratification, society]
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Philosophy: Oedipus and Aristotle - Through Aristotle’s specific definition of a tragic hero, it can be concluded that Oedipus is a tragic hero. Oedipus The King was written by a well-known tragic dramatist named Sophocles. This story is considered to be one of the greatest tragedies of all time. In fact, the Marjorie Barstow of the Classical Weekly says that it “fulfills the function of a tragedy, and arouses fear and pity in the highest degree” (Barstow). It is also very controversial because of the relationship that Oedipus has with his mother, although it was unknown at the time that they were related....   [tags: tragic hero, Sophocles, heroic traits, flaw]
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Let's Discuss Aristotle's Views - ... So in theory that means even though it can be separated from its original form it can never be stated as individual when it will always be of that shirt. Individuality is what makes it stand alone. If that fabric patch was then used to make something else then yes it will have gotten it’s individuality by forming a new creation instead of being still of that shirt. I know it may sound confusing but just like most people when we see a table, we don’t think “oh that used to be an Oak Tree”, we usually just see a pretty table made of wood....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 1045 words
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Tartuffe: An Excellent Example of a Neoclassical Drama - Tartuffe is an excellent example of a neoclassical drama because of its close adherence to the guidelines set forth in Aristotle’s Poetics, its use of character structure, and its incorporation of the common neoclassical ideas involving: reason, rational thinking, as well as logical problem solving. During the beginning of the 17th Century neoclassical thought began to dominate the stage in France. In the domain of theatre, this meant that neoclassical writers began to look back to the ideals and beliefs of classical times, accentuating the classic ideas of rational control and discipline....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Drama]
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Aristotle's Golden Mean Theory - A quote from Aristotle “…Too much or too little; and both extremes are wrong. The mean and good is feeling at the right time, about the right things, in relation to the right people, and for the right reason; and the mean and the good are the task of virtue” (NE 2.6). For Aristotle virtue is happiness, it is also human excellence and to become an excellent human one must achieve virtue. You’re probably thinking “who gives a flying hoot about this shit” and if you’re actually thinking some relative form of not caring, let me tell you that’s why I’m here to tell you why you should care....   [tags: finding a balance for happiness] 1535 words
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Oedipus the King: A Classic Tragedy - ... Tragic stories offer a sense of learning about the human condition. Learning is a necessary step in the tragedy cycle; this learning is called the catharsis. A catharsis is often a cleansing or healing of the mind and a teaching about the human condition. As the audience watches the events unfold throughout the play they feel a sense of fear or pity. All of these feelings are purified/cleansed when the protagonist falls into suffering. As a broken man, one who now only seeks to make right from what his pride blinded him from seeing, Oedipus asks for forgiveness....   [tags: ancient Greek works, Sophocles] 1018 words
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Aristotle's Teachings - Aristotle is a well-known philosopher, who lived from 384 BC through 322 BC, having been born and spending most of his life in Greece. According to William Turner, in the Catholic Encyclopedia, his father was physician to the King of Macedonia, and other ancestors of Aristotle’s likely also held this position. Aristotle’s parents probably planned for him to receive a medical education so he also could become a physician, but both of his parents died while he was still a child. As he approached the age of 18, he was sent to school at the university of another great and well-known philosopher, Plato....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Aristotle's Happiness - With self-help books garnishing millions of dollars annually, it's no mystery that people have been looking for a "correct" way to live out their lives. This was as prevalent in ancient Greece as it is today. Aristotle had what he thought was an ideal activity for all those who wanted to live life to the fullest, be happy, and have purpose. Aristotle argues that the best and most satisfying activity is study on the grounds that it fulfills the requirements for happiness as an activity better than others....   [tags: Philosophy] 964 words
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Society Practices in Plato and Aristotles - ... Aristotle is seen as the advocate for inequality in his work, but he had the belief, but in Politics the issue of equality comes up various times, he believes that the desire for equality is what ignites conflict, and that the greed of imposing power over equality always wins and that annoyed him. He believes that the city needs to be ruled by those who are alike. Plato in the other hand, believed in equality, but he had a group of people that were known as “the guardians,” they were trained group of people that are responsible for the management of the society....   [tags: elitism, beliefs, theories, literary analysis] 587 words
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Distinctions and Comparisons between Aristotle and Plato - The ideas introduced by Plato on the theory of forms, where deducted and critiqued by Aristotle. Both philosophers can be viewed as having opposing ideologies. Nonetheless, Plato and Aristotle are in agreement on certain factors of their philosophy. Many have scrutinized and compared the dissimilarities and similarities of Aristotle's doctrine of categories and Plato's theory of forms. The observations found are of an interesting nature. The beauty behind the writings of Plato is to not accept what is interpreted through the senses....   [tags: Philosophy] 1671 words
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A Comparative Study on the Philosophies of Plato and Aristotle - Plato and Aristotle are undoubtedly the greatest of philosophers that the world has seen. Both Plato and Aristotle formed unique and distinct theories about the Greek city states. While most people believe that Plato and Aristotle are complete opposites of one another, it is not completely true. For those who have studied the works of both the philosophers, the theory proposed by Aristotle is just a development of the Platonic system because it does away with the cons of Plato’s theory. However, it has been noted that Aristotle never let a day pass by when he didn’t criticise Plato....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers] 1587 words
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Nicomachean Ethics - Through books one to three in Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle distinguishes between pain and happiness, clarifying the endless war that men face in the path of these two extremes. Man’s quest for pleasure is considered by the self-conscious and rational Aristotle; a viewpoint traditionally refuted in contemporary, secular environments. Immediately, Aristotle alleges that all actions aim for good, thus proposing that all human activity is to be of some good. These activities attempt to meet a greater end; a chief good met by subordinate desires....   [tags: Aristotle] 1016 words
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Aristotle's Politics: Man Is a Political Animal - In the Aristotle’s Politics Book I, Aristotle determines that man is by nature a political animal, and in accordance to that the polis is created naturally. Aristotle’s first argument states how a polis comes into being by stating “Now in these matters as elsewhere it is by looking at how things develop naturally from the beginning that one may best study them.”(Pg 2, line24) At the beginning of chapter 2, Aristotle claims that a polis comes out of need, but also reproduction. This is idea is different with the views of Socrates and Plato in the republic....   [tags: polis, law, humans, survive, virtuous] 710 words
(2 pages)
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John Stewart Mill and Aristotle on Happiness - ... Mill conversely believed that though flourishing is uniquely human, humans seek pleasure, and it is the result of that search, not the simultaneous action, that produces flourishing. The idea of flourishing also pertains more closely to the individual level, as Mill saw it, for pleasure is an intimate idea, and unique to the individual. After finding pleasure, and with personal happiness, then society too will flourish. For Mill, women were equal to men because the process of seeking pleasure is something that neither man or woman has a distinct advantage in, and so the result of flourishing is just as much accredited to female as it is to male....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 631 words
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How Aristotle Understands the Human Being - In what ways does Aristotle present the human being. In this paper I will interpret how Aristotle understands the human being. In the first part of this paper I will explain the concept of the human telos. In the second part I will present how Aristotle defines knowledge the four causes in his theory. In the third part I will round off the idea of a human being according to Aristotle. In the fourth part I will explain the four causes in Aristotle’s theory. Finally, I will disclose with two types of virtues presented in the theory....   [tags: virtue ethics, philosophical analysis] 766 words
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Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics - Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics explores the idea of an ethical framework based on virtues, deliberation, and choice. The key to being virtuous is to strike a balance between the extremes on either side of a virtue. Arriving at what constitutes as a virtuous balance is achieved through the process of deliberation and then action. Sartre and the existentialists say that existence precedes essence; the good starts from human subjectivity rather than from known virtues. Through a person’s choices, they determine what is good....   [tags: framework based on choice, virtues, deliberation] 1266 words
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tragoed Oedipus the King (Oedipus Rex) and Greek Tragedy - Oedipus Rex as a Great Greek Tragedy     The reader is told in Aristotle's Poetics that tragedy "arouses the emotions of pity and fear, wonder and awe" (The Poetics 10). To Aristotle, the best type of tragedy involves reversal of a situation, recognition from a character, and suffering. The plot has to be complex, and a normal person should fall from prosperity to misfortune due to some type of mistake. Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles, is a great example of a Greek tragedy. Its main plot is Oedipus' goal to find out his true identity, the result being his downfall by finding out he has married his own mother and killed his father....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
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Aristotle's Theory of the Soul in the De Anima - Aristotle's Theory of the Soul in the De Anima centres on the kinds of souls possessed by different kinds of living things, distinguished by their different operations. He holds that the soul is the form, or essence of any living thing; that it is not a distinct substance from the body that it is in; that it is the possession of soul (of a specific kind) that makes an organism an organism at all, and thus that the notion of a body without a soul, or of a soul in the wrong kind of body, is simply unintelligible....   [tags: living, possession, hylomorphic]
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Forms and Causes: Philosophies of Aristotle and Plato - Aristotle and Plato are two of the most influential philosophers in history. Plato was Socrates’ greatest student and in turn taught Aristotle. In time, Aristotle became Plato’s greatest student. Together Aristotle and Plato, along with Socrates, laid the groundwork for what we now know as Western philosophy and science. Plato, in addition to being a philosopher, wrestled at the Olympic level, is one of the classical Greek authors, mathematicians and the founder of The Academy, the first higher learning institute in the west....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Aristotle vs Plato - Aristotle is considered by many to be one of the most influential philosophers in history. As a student of Plato, he built on his mentor’s metaphysical teachings of things like The Theory of Forms and his views on the soul. However, he also challenged them, introducing his own metaphysical ideas such as act and potency, hylemorphism, and the four causes. He used these ideas to explain his account of the soul and the immateriality of intellect. Prior to Aristotle, philosophers like Parmenides and Heraclitus argued about the existence of change....   [tags: Metaphysics,The Four Causes, Soul and Body] 1659 words
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Recipe for Happiness in Aristotle's The Nicomachean Ethics - ... Without going into society and using our reason, Aristotle seems to argue with his empirical approach that we will not be able to find happiness because we are not acting out our unique function. As we discussed in class, Aristotle thought it seemed likely that the only way to reach our ultimate goal of happiness was through teleology which involves humans doing what is in their nature to do. The empiricist Aristotle argues that what we humans do best is use our unique reasoning. This reasoning is used to balance our character through the use of virtues....   [tags: virtues, reasoning, balance]
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