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Aristotle's Logical Foundation of Physiognomics - Aristotle's Logical Foundation of Physiognomics ABSTRACT: Whenever we meet an unknown person, our first judgment, even unwillingly and often subconsciously, starts from his or her external appearance. Since character can be properly recognized only from words and deeds observed over some time, at first sight we have to rely on what we immediately can see. This physiognomical first approach to each other is as old as humankind, and, though it has never been able to be proved a proper science, in everyday life we all believe in and use physioculture....   [tags: Aristotle] 1906 words
(5.4 pages)
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Analysis of Aristotle and Plato's Thoughts - Philosophers are all known for questioning and exploring Ideals; taking a look at all options and what is most important. While Aristotle and Plato both take a plunge into the unknowns of a political state, Aristotle demonstrates a state for individuals, to rule as equals, contrary to Plato’s strict utopian structure and group over individual hierarchy view of the ideal state. Plato’s ideal state is strictly structured through a utopian ideal. Everything within Plato’s ideal state has a place and purpose, and everyone within it is aware of that....   [tags: aristotle, plato's ideal, utopia]
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988 words
(2.8 pages)
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Aristotle and Plato's Views on Reality - Aristotle and Plato were both great thinkers but their views on realty were different. Plato viewed realty as taking place in the mind but Aristotle viewed realty is tangible. Even though Aristotle termed reality as concrete, he stated that reality does not make sense or exist until the mind process it. Therefore truth is dependent upon a person’s mind and external factors. According to Aristotle, things are seen as taking course and will eventually come to a stop when potential is reached. The entire process of potential to actuality is call causation....   [tags: Aristotle, Plato, philosophy, ] 983 words
(2.8 pages)
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Comparison of Aristotle and Thomas Hobbes - The foremost difference between Aristotle and Hobbes, and in turn classical and modern political philosophies’, with regard to a good life and happiness is that of normative judgments about the good life. While Hobbes rejects normative judgments about the good life and discusses human actions without attributions of moral quality, Aristotle offers the exact opposite. In Ethics, Aristotle differentiates between good and evil actions along with what the best good, or summum bonum, for all humans while Hobbes approach argues that good and bad varies from one individual to another with good being the object of an individuals appetite or desire, and evil being an object of his hate and aversion....   [tags: Aristotle vs Hobbes]
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1039 words
(3 pages)
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Aristotle's Theory of the Good Life - According to Aristotle, the good life is the happy life, as he believes happiness is an end in itself. In the Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle develops a theory of the good life, also known as eudaimonia, for humans. Eudaimonia is perhaps best translated as flourishing or living well and doing well. Therefore, when Aristotle addresses the good life as the happy life, he does not mean that the good life is simply one of feeling happy or amused. Rather, the good life for a person is the active life of functioning well in those ways that are essential and unique to humans....   [tags: Aristotle, happiness, eudaimonia] 961 words
(2.7 pages)
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Definitions of a Tragedy: Shakespeare's and Aristotle's - In writing a tragedy, there are certain standards and guidelines to which an author or playwright must follow. One such standard is the Aristotelian definition of tragedy and the tragic hero. William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth is a perfect mold of an Aristotelian Tragedy. It displays all eight aspects of Aristotle’s definition of tragedy. It is set mainly in Scotland, but briefly in England during the eleventh century. It illuminates the ideal plot, in which the action of the story, or Macbeth’s murder of Duncan along with his meticulous planning of other murders, takes place over the course of several days in Scotland, particularly at Macbeth’s castle in Dunsinane....   [tags: Tragedy, shakespeare, aristotelian, Aristotle,] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
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Philosophy: Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - What is the good. How do we know what the good is. How do we attain the good. What are the major obstacles in attaining the good. These questions have a great practical importance for individual as well as collective life. However, disagreements emerge when it comes to answering these questions. Throughout history, philosophers, theologians and other thinkers have tried to resolve these disagreements by providing their own and ‘new’ understanding of what is Good. In this essay, I will explain how Aristotle and Augustine have understood this ideal and how they have answered these questions....   [tags: aristotle, augustine, good]
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1339 words
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Politics by Aristotle - The subject which the question focuses on is the view of Aristotle’s ideal state. The distinction between hierarchy and equality is at the heart of the understanding of Aristotle’s ideal state. He claims that an ideal state ought to be arranged to maximise the happiness of its citizens. So happiness together with political action is the telos of human life. This end can be reached by living a better ethical life. However, he endorses hierarchy over equality. On one hand we have the equality which benefits everyone; on the other hand we have the distinction of classes meant in terms of diversities and differences where the middle one appears to be the means through which the state is balanced...   [tags: Aristotle's Ideal State, Happiness Politics]
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1847 words
(5.3 pages)
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Aristotle's Philosophy on Purpose - Aristotle, the last of the great Greek philosophers. He roamed Ancient Greece from 384 BC until his death in 323 BC. In this time, he wrote an enormous amount of works, a variety of books from metaphysics to politics and to poetry. His variety is exceptionally impressive. His greatest known works are the Athenian Constitution and Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle’s works of Ethics explore a vast area of topics. He states, “The goal of the Ethics is to determine how best to achieve happiness.” In order to achieve happiness, one must live a virtuous life, in the mind of Aristotle....   [tags: Aristotle, Philosophy, Purpose, ]
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893 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Art of a Good Story from Aristotle's Five Elements - “In his poetics, Aristotle declared that the hierarchy of dramatic effects was in descending order as follows: plot, character, dialogue…” (Watts, 56). A good story is one that utilizes five elements of craft in coherence with one another to further the reader’s understanding of the narrative. In accordance with Aristotle, plot is the most crucial to building a successful story and should be examined first. As stated by Nigel Watts, author of over ten books, “A classical plot is a narrative of causality which results in a completed process of significant change, giving the reader emotional satisfaction” (Watts, 28)....   [tags: Aristotle, storytelling,] 1396 words
(4 pages)
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Historical Views of Leadership: Plato and Aristotle - What is leadership, and how do we attain the best and most effective leaders. These are questions that are as old as civilization itself. Bass (1974) wrote that, “from its infancy, the study of history has been the study of leaders” (as cited in Wren, 1995, p. 50). Since the study of history in the West is commonly held to begin with Herodotus of ancient Athens, it is not surprising that we should examine the historical views of leadership through the eyes of two titans of Greek thought: Plato and Aristotle....   [tags: Leadership, Plato, Aristotle]
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1328 words
(3.8 pages)
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Aristotle and Islam: Two Views of Women's Rights - Aristotle is one of the most famous philosophers around the world. He is Greek; he lived between 384 BC and 322 BC . He wrote in many aspects such as physics, metaphysics, logic, politics, government and ethics . While concerning politics and government, it is clear that Aristotle has some effective ideas to the state and the human society. On the other hand, Islam is one of the religious that take about how the society works and how to keep the state. They both talk about justice and equality between the members of the society....   [tags: Aristotle, philosophy, women, feminism, ] 1052 words
(3 pages)
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Physics of Aristotle - The great Greek thinker Aristotle was born in 384 B.C. in Stagirus, a city in ancient Macedonia in northern Greece. At the age of eighteen Aristotle went to Athens to begin his studies at Plato's Academy. He stayed and studied at the Academy for nineteen years and in that time became both a teacher and an independent researcher. After Plato's death in 347 B.C. Aristotle spent twelve years traveling and living in various places around the Aegean Sea. It was during this time that Aristotle was asked by Philip of Macedon to be a private tutor to his son, Alexander....   [tags: physics aristotle] 1385 words
(4 pages)
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Plato and Aristotle: Their Contributions to the Development of Western Philosophy - The philosophies of Plato and Aristotle and their contributions to the development of western philosophy. Plato was a classical Greek philosopher and one of the top 5 contributors to Western philosophy, educator after his mentor, Socrates and teacher of Aristotle. His sophistication as a writer started while under the tutelage of Socrates, continued through his establishing of his own academy, (The Academy of Athens which has been labeled as the first institution of higher learning in the Western World) and throughout his many years as an open minded author....   [tags: Plato and Aristotle Essays] 606 words
(1.7 pages)
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Aristotle's Persuasion using Ethos, Pathos and Logos, and the Media - Aristotle came up with a useful set of principals used in persuading. Those principals, ethos, pathos, and logos are most commonly seen in the media. When being used in the media two of Aristotle’s principals become more useful, while one falls behind. Ethos, being the one that falls behind by not appealing to a wide variety of the public. While, in the media, pathos, the emotional appeal, and logos, the logical appeal, are the most effective. One of the more effective is the pathos appeal. When using pathos the media is hitting the broadest population of listeners and readers....   [tags: Aristotle, philosophy, media] 633 words
(1.8 pages)
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Aristotle and Friendship - I We know that Aristotle thinks that (a) the good life consists in excellent, distinctively human activity, (b) such activity involves character and an ideal of what is noble and worth doing for its own sake, and (c) that this activity is (deeply) enjoyable and satisfying because in so acting, the virtuous person is doing just what she wants to be doing. II In Books VIII and IX, Aristotle discusses the role of friendship in the good life. From what has been said so far, it is clear that he must think there is an intimate link between friendship and virtuous activity....   [tags: Philosophy, Aristotle 2014] 1000 words
(2.9 pages)
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How Globalization is Changing World Governments Compared to Plato and Aristotle's Government - The way the government structure is organized has been changing ever since humans began to live in a polis. The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle believed that humans were political animals, thus the reason for organizing ourselves into a political state. However the way governments are organized, and which political system works best has been the centrepiece for many violent conflicts in the past, and will continue to challenge the world into the future. Yet a new form of organization is taking place in the 21st century and has been given the term “globalization.” With the onset of globalization many of those in government have had to change their governing style in order to keep up with...   [tags: Globalization, Governments, Plato, Aristotle] 2559 words
(7.3 pages)
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Theory and Praxis in Aristotle and Heidegger - Theory and Praxis in Aristotle and Heidegger ABSTRACT: The discussion of Heidegger's “destructive retrieve” of Aristotle has been intensified in recent years by the publication of Heidegger's courses in the years surrounding his magnum opus. Heidegger's explicit commentary on Aristotle in these courses permits one to read Being and Time with Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Metaphysics. My paper analyzes a network of differences between the two thinkers, focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis....   [tags: Aristotle heidegger Essays] 3463 words
(9.9 pages)
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Aristotle and the Techne of Rhetoric - Aristotle and the Techne of Rhetoric Between the third and fifth centuries B.C. there existed a “golden and classical age” of thought in the ancient world, with the majority of this activity centered in the polis of Athens, Greece. Although the city is historically recognized for its legendary conflict with rival polis Sparta, Athens is perhaps best known for the creation of democracy—that noble political experiment that laid the preliminary structure for most of the rights we Americans enjoy today....   [tags: History Aristotle Essays]
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1437 words
(4.1 pages)
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Aristotle's Idea of Tragedy and the Play "Fires in the Mirror" - Aristotle was a phenomenal Greek philosopher. His words and thoughts inspired millions, and continue inspiring today. He taught lessons to those who would listen, he preached his scientific findings, but above all, Aristotle enjoyed the theatre. In fact, Aristotle had his own views about different genres. Today we will look at tragedy. In Aristotle’s mind, a tragedy was the process of imitating an action which had serious implications, was complete, and possessed magnitude. He even composed six elements that a tragedy must contain....   [tags: Anna Devere Smith, Aristotle, Tragedy, Fires in th] 1245 words
(3.6 pages)
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Analysis of Aristotle's The Politics - An Analysis of Aristotle's The Politics In "The Politics", Aristotle would have us believe that man by nature is a political animal. In other words, Aristotle seems to feel that the most natural thing for men to do is to come together in some form of political association. He then contends that this political association is essential to the pursuit of the good life. Finally he attempts to distinguish what forms of political association are most suitable to the pursuit of this good life. In formulating a critique of "The Politics", we shall first examine his claims as to what is natural to man and whether the criterion of the natural is sufficient to demonstrate virtue....   [tags: Aristotle Poetics Politics Essays]
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3247 words
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The Contradictions in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics - When I think about what makes me happiest in life, I put my family and friends at the top of the list. I know that there is no way I would be who I am today without them. My family loves me and has taught me most of what I know about how to live. Friends have taught me so much more about myself than I could ever have imagined; how to laugh at myself, how to love myself, how to learn from my mistakes, etc. All these people in my life have given me so much and I have in return offered what I have to give....   [tags: Philosophy Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle ] 786 words
(2.2 pages)
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Slavery in Aristotle's Works - Before a serious investigation of any aspect of Aristotle’s political theories is undertaken, we must take a moment to acknowledge that many of the institutions and doctrines he defends have been repudiated in modern political thought. In fact many such institutions are appalling and simply morally wrong. One such institution is slavery. Aristotle argues in the Politics that slavery is just. No argument is needed to conclude that Aristotle made a terrible ethical and moral error in defending slavery....   [tags: Aristotle Philosophy Slavery Essays] 3305 words
(9.4 pages)
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Human Function: Aristotle’s Basis for Ethical Value - Human Function: Aristotle’s Basis for Ethical Value I. Aristotle’s Virtue Ethics Depend on the Human Function Aristotle presents a system of virtue ethics in Nicomachean Ethics. This work presents a prescriptive theory with the aim of showing how humans may reach a proper state of happiness in which the natural human end is fulfilled. This end is regarded as an end in itself to which subordinate ends are related. This master end itself is understood as a type of activity rather than a state that can be achieved with a limited series of actions, and this activity is described as a general practice of acting well in accord with reason....   [tags: Philosophy Aristotle]
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3579 words
(10.2 pages)
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Aristotle: A Comprehensive View on Nature and Society - Aristotle: A Comprehensive View on Nature and Society In order to fully understand Aristotle’s views on a natural system, it is necessary to first explain some general principles of his philosophy. It is in his work the Categories that Aristotle presents the concept of substance, a concept that will serve as the foundation for much of his philosophical system. Substance, for Aristotle, is not a universal, but rather, it is the particular; substance is not a “such,” but a “this.” Thus, substance is neither in nor is it said of a subject (as are qualities)....   [tags: Aristotle Philosophy Philosophers Essays] 1196 words
(3.4 pages)
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Aristotle's Poetics: Complexity and Pleasure in Tragedy - Aristotle's Poetics: Complexity and Pleasure in Tragedy Aristotle 384-322 BC First, the instinct of imitation is implanted in man from childhood, one difference between him and other animals being that he is the most imitative of living creatures, and through imitation learns his earliest lessons; and no less universal is the pleasure felt in things imitated. We have evidence of this in the facts of experience. Objects which in themselves we view with pain, we delight to contemplate when reproduced with minute fidelity Poetics Chapter 1V In his Poetics [1] Aristotle classifies plot into two types: simple [haplos], and complex [peplegmenos]....   [tags: Aristotle Poetics Essays]
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2113 words
(6 pages)
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Aristotle's View of Slavery - Born in the year of 384 B.C. Aristotle was seen as conventional for his time, for he regarded slavery as a natural course of nature and believed that certain people were born to be slaves due to the fact that their soul lacked the rational part that should rule in a human being; However in certain circumstances it is evident that Aristotle did not believe that all men who were slaves were meant to be slaves. In his book Politics, Aristotle begins with the Theory of The Household, and it is here that the majority of his views upon slavery are found....   [tags: Slave Slavery Aristotle Paper Essay] 1276 words
(3.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Categories - Aristotle’s Categories Things are said to be named 'equivocally' when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. Thus, a real man and a figure in a picture can both lay claim to the name 'animal'; yet these are equivocally so named, for, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. For should any one define in what sense each is an animal, his definition in the one case will be appropriate to that case only....   [tags: Philosophy Aristotle] 3325 words
(9.5 pages)
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Book VII of the Nichomachean Ethics by Aristotle - Book VII of the Nichomachean Ethics by Aristotle Introduction In book seven of the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle sets out his theory of akrasia, or weakness of will. Aristotle attempts to explain both how such actions are possible (contra Socrates), and how we can dissolve the puzzles (aporiai) generated by our most important (kurios) commonly held beliefs, which arise in response to the actions of the incontinent person. This paper will review book VII of the Nichomachean Ethics (EN), and attempt to resolve some of the remaining questions left open by Aristotle’s critique....   [tags: Aristotle Nichomachean Ethics Philosophy Essays]
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2981 words
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Aristotle's Political Virtues - Aristotle's Political Virtues ABSTRACT: This paper argues that Aristotle conceives happiness not primarily as an exercise of virtue in private or with friends, but as the exercise of virtue in governing an ideal state. The best states are knit together so tightly that the interests of one person are the same as the interests of all. Hence, a person who acts for his or her own good must also act for the good of all fellow citizens. It follows that discussions of Aristotle’s altruism and egoism are misconceived....   [tags: Aristotle Politics Philosophy Essays]
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3458 words
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The Relevance of Aristotle’s Poetics to the World Today - The Relevance of Aristotle’s Poetics to the World Today      The Canadian novelist Michael Ondaatje, in his last novel titled In the Skin of a Lion, wrote that "the first sentence of every novel should be: Trust me, this will take time but there is order here, very faint, very human" (Ondaatje 223).  Ondaatje noted that what makes a novel a novel is order or, as that order is sometimes referred to today, plot and structure.  It is that structure that we, as both the audience and the artist, rely on to understand and appreciate a work of art.  But, even though Ondaatje noticed the order necessary, he did not do what has been done before--offer an explanation, or rather, a definition of tha...   [tags: Aristotle Poetics Essays]
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1161 words
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Aristotle's Ethics - Aristotle’s thoughts on ethics conclude that all humans must have a purpose in life in order to be happy. I believe that some of the basics of his ideas still hold true today. This essay points out some of those ideas. It was Aristotle’s belief that everything, including humans, had a telos or goal in life. The end result or goal was said to be happiness or “eudaimonia”. He explained that eudaimonia was different for each person, and that each had a different idea of what it meant. Further, he said that people must do things in moderation, but at the same time do enough....   [tags: Aristotle and the Concept of Telos]
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577 words
(1.6 pages)
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Matthew Arnold versus Aristotle's Poetics - The value of imitation: a vision of Aristotle's Poetics Aristotle wrote his Poetics thousands of years before Matthew Arnold's birth. His reasons for composing it were different from Arnold's reasons for using it as an element of his own poetic criticism. We can safely say that Arnold was inclined to use the Poetics as an inspiration for his own poetry, and as a cultural weapon in the fight for artistic and social renewal. Aristotle, by contrast, was more concerned with discovering general truths, and with formalising truths already known intuitively within his own society....   [tags: Aristotle Imitation Matthew Arnold Poetry Poem]
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3849 words
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Aristotle’s Politics - The Good Man Should Not Rule the City - Aristotle’s Politics - The Good Man Should Not Rule the City Aristotle contends that the good man is dissimilar to the good citizen in ways he goes a great length to illustrate. He distinguishes the two for the purpose of facilitating his later arguments concerning the appropriate allocation of sovereignty to the rightful ruler, who he subsequently claims is the good man who excels all others in each and every aspect. Aristotle's distinction further prompts the notion that he advocates a monarchial form of constitution, for the rule of a single good man is equivalent to a constitution of kingship....   [tags: Aristotle Poetics Politics Essays]
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2514 words
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The Relation between Seneca’s Hercules Furens and Aristotle’s Poetics - The Relation between Seneca’s Hercules Furens and Aristotle’s Poetics The intent of this paper is to discuss Seneca’s Hercules Furens in relation to Aristotle’s description of tragedy as outlined in the Poetics. It begins by discussing character, and attempts to determine the nature of Hercules’ error (a(marti/a).1[1] The paper then discusses matters of plot (mu~qoj), attempting to determine the degree to which Hercules Furens meets Aristotle’s requirements for good tragedy in this regard. According to Aristotle, the best tragedy evokes feelings of fear and pity.2[2] Since characters in a tragedy must perform action (pra~cij), it follows that the best tragedy must contain some action that...   [tags: Aristotle Poetics Politics Essays]
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1791 words
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The Beautiful in Kant's Third Critique and Aristotle's Poetics - The Beautiful in Kant's Third Critique and Aristotle's Poetics ABSTRACT: I argue that Kant's analysis of the experience of the beautiful in the third Critique entails an implicit or potential experience of the sublime, that is, the sublime as he himself describes it. Finding the sublime in the beautiful is what I call philosophical beauty. I then consider some aspects of Aristotle's analysis of tragedy in the Poetics, specifically his identification of the key elements of tragedy as those involving the experience of fear and pity, which leads to a catharsis of these emotions....   [tags: Kant Third Critique Aristotle Poetics Essays] 3443 words
(9.8 pages)
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Influence of Aristotle’s Poetics on William Wordsworth’s Poetry and William Shakespeare’s Plays - The Influence of Aristotle on William Wordsworth’s Poetry and William Shakespeare’s Plays Aristotle’s Poetics is not one of his major works, although it has exercised a great deal of influence upon subsequent literary studies and criticism. In this work Aristotle outlines and discusses many basic elements that an author should adhere to in order to write a great tragedies and/or poetry. Two important topics that Aristotle addresses and believes to be crucial to the art work is the mimesis, or imitation of life, and that the audience has an emotional response from the work, or a catharsis....   [tags: Aristotle Tragedy Tragedies] 677 words
(1.9 pages)
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Aristotle's Reform of Paideia - Aristotle's Reform of Paideia ABSTRACT: Ancient Greek education featured the pedagogical exercise of dialectic, in which a student defended a thesis against rigorous questioning by an instructor. Aristophanes’ Clouds, as well as Plato and Aristotle, criticize the practice for promoting intellectual skepticism, moral cynicism, and an eristic spirit - the desire to win in argument rather than seek the truth. I suggest Aristotle’s logic is meant to reform the practice of dialectic. In the first part of my paper, I defend the thesis that Aristotle’s syllogistic is an art of substantive reasoning against the contemporary view that it is a science of abstract argument forms....   [tags: Paideia Artistotle Philosophy Essays]
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The Influence of Aristotle - Aristotle is considered by many to be The Fountainhead of modern scientific thinking. The forces that influenced Aristotle, is perhaps better understood on a historic basis has been laid. The Greek thinkers around 600 BC, began to interrupt the world around them as governed by anything other than his many personifications of gods and they took in a naturalistic way of thinking, which in turn was to the early science. This may have been sparked by their enthusiasm for travel abroad, which may have made them skeptical of their traditions.2 Thales (ca....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1283 words
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Aristotle and The Politics - Philosopher and scientist, disciple of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great, acclaimed thinker and traveller in exile, it is nearly impossible to catch Aristotle in a defined denomination. It seems indeed that he lived several lives in one, experiencing fame and dishonour, starting from bottom to reach top but collapsing because of the people’s disapproval: the tragedy of the classic philosopher maybe. As a consequence his work is a reflection of his life: complex and incredibly diverse. Like a scientist he observed and dissected the world around him in many fields: from philosophical concepts with The Metaphysics to inanimate things in On Minerals via the structure of an ideal state in...   [tags: philosphy, science, hierarchy, justice, equality]
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2107 words
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Aristotle on Courage - In the 1939 movie classic, The Wizard of Oz, the Cowardly Lion is on a quest for the wizard to give him courage. He is afraid of everything and anything. However, in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle believes that courage is possible for all individuals. To gain courage one must have the inner qualities that will guide the courageous. The most important part of these qualities is to come to terms with death itself. Also, there are views of courage that are falsely perceived because they appear to be parallel with one another; nevertheless they are still very different....   [tags: Nicomachean Ethics, Traits]
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1083 words
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Who is Aristotle? - ... Without a brain to send signals to all parts of our body, we would be lifeless vegetables without the abilities to walk, talk, dream, or think for ourselves. Not to mention, the brain also must send signals to the heart commanding it to pump blood. Therefore, without the brain, or soul, to send signals to the heart to keep it beating, we would not be alive. Another great belief of Aristotle was “Virtue as the Golden Mean”. He believed that, “Human passions are capable of inciting a wide range of action, from too little to too much.” Basically, what Aristotle meant is that humans tend to choose one side, when in all reality, we should be choosing a middle ground between two choices....   [tags: greatest philosophers, human nature] 747 words
(2.1 pages)
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Aristotle On Friendship - Aristotle wrote on many subjects in his lifetime but one of the virtues that he examines more extensively is friendship. Aristotle believes that there are three different kinds of friendship: utility, pleasure, and virtuous friendships. He also argues that a real friendship should be highly valued because it is a complete virtue and he believes it to be greater than honor and justice. Aristotle suggests that human’s love of utility and pleasure is the only reason why the first two types of friendships exist....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek Philosophers] 1342 words
(3.8 pages)
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Descartes and Aristotle - People live life one day at time with the same guidance from their ancestors, and they often question their existence in the universe and try to understand the world around them. People often question their existence in the universe. Philosophers try to answer questions that most people will not think of in their daily lives. Most philosophers try to get to the truth of logical questions through epistemology. Epistemology is a “branch of philosophy that studies the nature and possibility of knowledge” (Soccio)....   [tags: Rationalism, Priori, Posteriori, Philosophers]
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1353 words
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Aristotle and Plato - Political society today, has taken many lessons from Plato and Aristotle’s political ideas. As was the case in Ancient Greece, there are many different political ideologies and regimes that will may serve the purpose for one society, but in another, could cause utter chaos. Aristotle attributed the need for there being a number of political regimes due to the fact that there are “many parts to a city.” (4.3.1) The many parts to a city that he was referring to, simply enforces the necessity of having different forms of office for each of these parts....   [tags: Government, Ancient Greece, Thinkers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Aristotle and Tragedy - A tragedy’s itended purpose is to raise emotions of both pity and fear through a catharsis. The audience often feels empthatic for the protagonist, as he or she is likely described as a tragic hero. In order to be classified as a tragic hero there are specific criteria that must be met. Aristotle dissected tragedy to further understand the purpose, components, and the criterium. Through his studies, Aristotle formulated, Poetics, his very own book explaining his theory on tragedy. Aristotle defined tragedy as the “imitation of action according to the “law of probability or necessity” (“Outline of Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy.")....   [tags: pity, fear, catharsis, William Shakespeare]
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1135 words
(3.2 pages)
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Aristotle on Friendship - ... As a result, these friendships are coincidental. Friendships of utility have no real love of friendship, thus the friendship is incomplete. These types of friendships easily dissolve “when the friends do not remain similar [to what they were]; for if someone is no longer pleasant or useful, the other stops loving him” (1156a20). The people in friendships of utility are never really friends of each other, but of what was expedient for them. Often times what is useful in this type of friendship does not remain the same, but is rather different from time to time....   [tags: Nicomachean ethics, philosophical analysis] 1080 words
(3.1 pages)
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Metaphysics by Aristotle - Limitless Possibilities “All men by nature desire to know” (Aristotle, “Metaphysics”). Famous scientists such as Aristotle, who is said to be the originator of biological studies, performed experiments on living animals that gave mankind the basis of anatomy. Animals such a pigs and goats were first used to practice surgeries before applying them to humans. From there, humans have begun to test other operations and drugs on both living and nonliving animals. Evidence of experiments and dissections done on animals can be seen as far back as 500 BC.Without animal testing, many of the medicines humans use today for basic survival such as the insulin used for diabetics would not exist....   [tags: animal testing, animal research]
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1486 words
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The Life and Achievements of Aristotle - Aristotle was born in 384 BC. In Stagira, a small town northern Greece. He had one older brother and one sister. His father, Nicomachus, was a doctor. His mother, Phaestis, came from the island of Euboea. She was wealthy. Owning a house which later remained in the family after she married Nicomachus. There are hardly any personal details of Aristotle because he lived so long ago. The little details we know are mostly from a Greek Historian named Diogenes Laertius. In his book he said that Aristotle had a lisp when he spoke and had small eyes....   [tags: biography, philosophy, philosopher, Greek] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics - Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle then describes steps required for humans to obtain the ultimate happiness. He also states that activity is an important requirement of happiness. A virtuous person takes pleasure in doing virtuous things. He then goes on to say that living a life of virtue is something pleasurable in itself. The role of virtue to Aristotle is an important one, with out it, it seems humans cannot obtain happiness....   [tags: ancient Greek phylosophy]
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Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics - ... To achieve this topic, I have sectioned my paper into three main sections, in which I have subsections supporting. In the first section, I will provide much information about Aristotle and his beliefs in virtue and obtaining happiness. Using information from his book of ethics I will provide examples and quote on quote statements to support his views. In the second section, I will provide my agreements as to why I relate and very fond of Aristotle’s book of Nicomachean Ethics. In the third section, I will provide research as to why there are such objections to Aristotle’s book of ethics, and counter act as to why I disagree with them....   [tags: human goal, happiness] 787 words
(2.2 pages)
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Examining the Ethics of Plato and Aristotle - This essay will be examining the ethics of Plato (428-347 BCE) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C). I will firstly attempt to summarise the five fundamental concepts of Plato and Aristotle before providing my own opinion and view on their ethics. I will concentrate on their theories on the good life as a life of justice, censorship, knowledge and the good life. I will first examine Plato’s ethics. Plato was a philosopher who was both a rationalist and absolutist. According to his view, people must be schooled to acquire certain kinds of knowledge i.e....   [tags: Philosophy] 1064 words
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The Aristotle's Idea of a Good Life - Question: What is Aristotle’s idea of a good life and why does he view a good life in this way. Is Aristotle’s understanding of a good life accurate. Why or why not. (Make sure to talk about the concept of the mean). To Aristotle leading a good life, for the most part, means fulfilling one’s purpose in a way that is good by balancing life’s pleasures. In order to determine if an object fulfills its function in a good way, we must first consider the object. If we were to agree that a car should be reliable, then we could also agree that reliable car should be considered a good car....   [tags: happiness, life's pleasures, good human]
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Aristotle on the Nature of Happiness and Virtue - ... It is the exercise of virtue, which Aristotle explains that it’s something you work for it, you are not happy just for five minutes, we have to work and sacrifice that virtue to reach happiness. It cannot be achieved until the end of one’s life, there’s no short cut to it, and human happiness depends on the exercise of his reason. Acquiring a moral character, I believe it’s one of the most important things, happiness depends a lot on it; we will not achieve happiness just only by enjoying the pleasure of the moment, we need to make the right choices, and this involves keeping our eye on the future....   [tags: happiness, central purpose, people's lives] 1280 words
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The Ethics of Plato and Aristotle - This essay will be examining the ethics of Plato (428-347 BCE) and Aristotle (384-322 B.C). I will firstly attempt to summarise the three fundamental concepts of Plato and Aristotle before providing my own opinion and view on their ethics. I will concentrate on their theories on the good life as a life of justice, censorship and knowledge. Plato was a philosopher who was both a rationalist and absolutist. According to his view, people must be schooled to acquire certain kinds of knowledge, for example, mathematics, philosophy and so forth....   [tags: Philosophy] 1163 words
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The Ideal Governments of Plato and Aristotle - In Ancient Greece, people known as philosophers began contemplating the world in a different light. They had a different way of thinking than what was normal in the day. While others practiced paganism and worshipped the Gods of Olympus, philosophers thought about the body, the soul, and ways to create a better world. Greek philosophers are still known today and their works are still being read and taught. They have left a mark on this world. One topic that philosophers frequently discuss is politics and government....   [tags: ancient greece, philosophers]
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Aristotle and Hobbes on the Nature of Man - ... May Hope states almost the same thing from the book “Aristotle's Ethics: Moral Development and Human Nature.” She along with the arguments of Sparague states that Aristotle’s theory that human good, can be seen to drew attention to the fact that humans, like human organs have a function to do in this life time. Therefore both writers say that Aristotle is stating that Human Nature is commonly good nature, but every man has a reason for their actions. Therefore the character from the novel Lord of the Flies that best fits Aristotle’s theory is Simon....   [tags: natural philosophy] 834 words
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Plato and Aristotle's Definition of Art - Two and a half centuries ago in the Mediterranean, the definition of art was not synonymous with the term as we know it. It encompassed painting, sculpting, poetry, and all what he still recognize as art, as well as craftwork, carpentry and similar occupations. Plato was the first to address the nature of art seriously, and did so quite emphatically. Considering it unimportant and even dangerous, he denounced it. His student, Aristotle, who handled the same subject next, held incompatible and sometimes opposing views on the matter....   [tags: Philosophy] 1261 words
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Aristotle, Alexander the Great, and Augustus - ... Although Aristotle wasn’t always right, (he believed the universe was eternal) his views were revolutionary and groundbreaking, and the effects of most of them can still be felt today. 4) Alexander the Great Alexander the Great, a student of Aristotle, was one the greatest military geniuses ever, and built a, “Macedonian-Greek empire that extended from the mainland of Greece to modern-day India” (Patterns, 105). Alexander succeeded his father Phillip in 336 BCE after he was assassinated by a Macedonian and took charge of his empire when he was only 20....   [tags: History, Leaders]
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Aristotle's Three Motivations For Friendship - Aristotle identifies three motivations for friendship: usefulness, pleasure and good. He postulates that when people seek friendship, they look for someone who is worthy of their affection based on one of those three motives. Whether his argument is true is debatable. Many might object to this simplification of such a complex topic. However, his theory holds weight within the context of Book VIII. Friendships based on two people’s usefulness to each other are considered by Aristotle to be the lowest form of friendship (Aristotle 220)....   [tags: Ethics, Philosophy]
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Aristotle on Happiness and Virtue - ... Aristotle’s work maintained practicality, which made a huge impact on upcoming moral philosophers. St. Thomas Aquinas and most of the other Christian philosophers were highly influenced by Aristotle’s work. Those people following the “Virtue Ethics" movement in the current era were, in fact, inspired by Aristotle himself. Arête & Eudaimonia The dictionary meaning of the Greek word ‘Eudaimonia’ is happiness. More accurately it means "living well” and "excellence". According to Aristotle, to achieve happiness is the ultimate goal of human life and it is the maximum goal (Carreras, 2011)....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers]
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Review of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics - Aristole’s Nichomachean Ethics is a critically acclaimed piece of literature that has laid the framework for philosophy as we know it today. It is considered to be a historical piece that was the first to address ethics in a unified, clear, and concise manner. The book was translated by F. H. Peters with an introduction by Hye-Kyung Kim. Aristotle was one of the great early philosophers who ventured to speak to humans about how they conducted themselves as they related to others; however, some of Aristotle’s ideologies were debated by his counterparts for hundreds of years....   [tags: Greek Philosophy, All The President's Men] 1379 words
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The Regimes Presented by Plato and Aristotle - Britannica defines a political system as “the set of formal legal institutions that constitute a ‘government’ or a ‘state’”.1 As the preceding definition implies, a political system is a large component of every government or state. Plato finds that each type of political system possesses a complementary constitution which governs a person’s body and soul (Republic 8.544e). Likewise, Aristotle observes that examples of each political system can also be found in households and communities (NE VIII.10, 1160b)....   [tags: Comparative Analysis, Political System] 1301 words
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Aristotle: Ethics and the Virtues - Aristotle's ethics consist of a form of virtue ethics, in which the ethical action is that which properly complies with virtue(s) by finding the mean within each particular one. Aristotle outlines two types of virtues: moral/character virtues and intellectual virtues. Though similar to, and inspired by, Plato and Socrates’ ethics, Aristotle's ethical account differs in some areas. Aristotle, a student of Plato, is known for his contributions in many fields of philosophy, ethics being one of the most prominent....   [tags: Virtue Ethics, Nicomachean Ethics]
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Aristotle's Notion on Eudaimonia and Virtue - In Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics he accounts that humans should make sacrifices and should ultimately aim first and foremost for their own happiness . In the paper I will argue that it is really in a person’s best interest to be virtuous . I will do this by first describing Aristotle’s notion on both eudaimonia and virtue , as well as highlighting the intimate relationship between the two . Secondly I will talk about the human role in society. Thirdly I will describe the intrinsic tie between human actions ....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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A Brief Biography of Aristotle - Aristotle Born in 384 B.C. in Stagira, Greece, little did the world know that there would be such great teachings, philosophies, theories, and laws to come all from this one person: Aristotle. Aristotle contributed to so many of societies biggest questions, wonders, and even fears. He worked with several other extremely significant philosophers of the past, and still well known today, much like Aristotle. He has made huge impacts that are still widely felt throughout modern society, in spheres such as political, scientific, and social....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers]
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Oedipus the King and Aristotle's Poetics - According to Aristotle, a tragedy must be an imitation of life in the form of a serious story that is complete in itself among many other things. Oedipus is often portrayed as the perfect example of what a tragedy should be in terms of Aristotle’s Poetics. Reason being that Oedipus seems to include correctly all of the concepts that Aristotle describes as inherent to dramatic tragedy. These elements include: the importance of plot, reversal and recognition, unity of time, the cathartic purging and evocation of pity and fear, the presence of a fatal flaw in the “hero”, and the use of law of probability....   [tags: Oedipus Rex]
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Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean - ... There are two kinds of virtues: the moral virtues, perfecting desire (who submits to reason) for the action, and intellectual virtues, perfecting the intellect alone, for contemplation. Let's begin with moral virtue; is it possible to teach virtue. Is it enough to know the good to do it. Obviously not. Aristotle argues that knowing the good is not yet doing it, because the reason is confronted by the desire, who rebels and resists. We must therefore form the desire from the good, exercise it, and shape it....   [tags: virtue, moral law, consequence]
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Aristotle: The Pursuit of Happiness - Aristotle and Plato both are both well known for their focus on defining the purpose of being human. To them, humans have a particular characteristic that no other living thing possesses. That characteristic is that humans strive to achieve a level of goodness. Although they agree with each other that there is a highest good one must achieve in order to live a fulfilling life, they have different ideas on what that good is. On Aristotle’s search to find the highest good of a human being, he first asked what the ergon, or task, of being human is....   [tags: plato, human being, philosophy]
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Democracy Outlined by Plato and Aristotle - In the fifth-century BC, Athens emerged as one of the most advanced state or polis in all of Greece. This formation of Athenian ‘democracy’ holds the main principle that citizens should enjoy political equality in order to be free to rule and be ruled in turn. The word ‘democracy’ originates from the Greek words demos (meaning people) and kratos (meaning power) therefore demokratia means “the power of the people.” The famous funeral speech of Pericles states that “Our constitution is called democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people.” However, only citizens (free adult men of Athenian descent) could participate in political matters....   [tags: democracy, athens, greece]
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Form and Matter in Aristotle - Aristotle defined nature “as an internal origin of change or stability”1. Natural substances are things such as animals, plants and inanimate matter like earth, water, fire and air. Each natural substance according to Aristotle has its own nature, which is what gives rise to its natural behaviour/characteristic. The nature of a natural substance is its inner principle/source of change.2 Therefore natural substances are capable of motion i.e. growing, gaining qualities, losing them and lastly being born and dying....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Aristotle, Rousseau and Descartes on Technology - While it is relatively easy to confuse the ideas of Aristotle, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and René Descartes, ancient philosophy, eighteenth century politics, and mathematics all appear to be considerably disconnected subjects. Associated with these divisions are three different opinions on a common subject matter: technology. It appears that Rousseau directly opposes technology, Aristotle’s opinion rests in the middle but also shares similarities with Rousseau, and Descartes favors technology. After reading Rousseau’s Discourse On the Origin of Inequality, Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics and Descartes’s The Discourse on Method, one can draw these conclusions....   [tags: phylosophical ideas]
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The Virtue of Generosity by Aristotle - In Nicomachean Ethics, generosity is the third virtue Aristotle examines. He directly addresses the idea of generosity to be the mean of wealth, meaning anything whose worth is measured by money. As presented by Aristotle, generosity is the intermediate of wastefulness and ungenerosity, wastefulness being the excess and ungenerosity being the deficiency. This virtue however, does not come naturally; generosity can arise through habit and takes experience as well as time. While generosity appears to be an important virtue, it is not the most essential virtue to one’s well being....   [tags: wastefulness, habit, perfect] 1163 words
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Conversation Between Plato and Aristotle - Dialogue Between Plato and Aristotle 2 As students file into the auditorium of the Academy the first thing that we all notice is the two professors that were standing at the front of the room. After all the students were seated that is when the first professor stepped forward to address the class. Plato: Good Morning Students. Students: Good Morning Professor. Plato: Many of you may know who I am and then there are those of you that do not. For those of you that do not know who I am, my name is Plato....   [tags: Knowledge, Philosophy] 741 words
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A Tragic Hero According to Aristotle - Tragic Heroism: In Sophocles’ play Antigone, the character of Creon exemplifies a tragic hero more than the characters of Antigone or Medea because he experiences a fall from grace and his prosperous position, possesses a tragic flaw, and accepts the responsibility of his actions in a way that does not blame anyone and “shows enlightenment and growth”, all in accordance with Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero. (“Connections: A Theory,” 2000). In the play Antigone, Creon falls from grace and loses everything, which is an important aspect of Aristotle’s tragic hero definition....   [tags: Sophocles, Antigone, Analysis]
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Expanding Beyond Philosophy: Aristotle - ... Many say Aristotle is the person behind all of the success of Alexander the Great. Aristotle’s childhood friend King Phillip II of Macedonia asked Aristotle to supervise his son Alexander’s education. At the time future Alexander the Great was only 13. Sources range from how long he actually tutored Alexander for; the time periods vary from three all the way to twelve years. While teaching Alexander, Aristotle taught philosophy, Government, politics, poetry, drama, and science. After Alexander came to power Aristotle kept in touch with him....   [tags: influnential, accomplishment, intelligent, system] 927 words
(2.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Poetics: Catharsis and Rasas - There are distinct differences between the theories outlined within Aristotle’s Poetics and Bharata’s The Nāṭyaśāstra which both attempt to elaborate upon the audience relationship and the phenomenon produced relating to the theatrical experience. However, despite the dissimilarities there are components of catharsis and rasa that share common elements and ideas surrounding the creation and the effects of these experiences. Aristotle contends the cathartic nature of tragedy aids in purgation of emotion, however ultimately limiting it to the powers of tragedy as only creating this, where, contrarily, The Nāṭyaśāstra outlines the power any actor has in creating bhāva, leading to rasa....   [tags: auciende, relationship, ancient greek]
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Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean - In this essay we will discuss and analyze Aristotle’s Doctrine of the Mean. This topic area can be found in Book II, page 888, 6—15, through 890, 25. The purpose for Aristotle touching on this subject matter was to discern the states of character which are virtuous from those which are not. By this, I mean he is attempting to categorize which virtues are causal of a human “to be in a good state and to perform their functions well”(888—15). In order to keep this paper orderly and comprehensible, we will work in chronological order through Aristotle’s variety of premises and conclusions which lead to his main idea which is ––––––––––––....   [tags: virtues, philosophical analysis] 1255 words
(3.6 pages)
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Aristotle and Plato "Ideal Government" - ... This system was similar to the one that we have now. The juror had an opinion, but due to the fact that it could sometimes become rowdy they only had an option of yes or no to say whether they were guilty or not. They also had to vote right away and never had the chance to talk about it before they voted like we have the chance of doing in today's society. Though citizens in the Juror were allowed to informally talk amongst themselves which is why they could also get very rowdy and sometimes prosecution was difficult to accomplish....   [tags: philosophy, theories, democracy] 1297 words
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Aristotle's Argument of the Polis - ... In the same vein, Aristotle proceeds, when a collection of villages is established, and these come to from a single complete community of great size, practically capable of being self-sufficient to a full degree, the polis or the city-state is thus said to come into existence. Here, Aristotle draws a fundamental distinction between the coming to be and the preservation of the city-state; that is, whereas the polis is formed for the sake of living, it “remains in being for the sake of living well” (1252B27-30)....   [tags: argument analysis, philosophy] 1743 words
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