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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Aldous Huxley"
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World introduces us to a futuristic technological world where monogamy is shunned, science is used in order to maintain stability, and society is divided by 5 castes consisting of alphas(highest), betas, gammas, deltas, and epsilons(lowest). In the Brave New World, the author demonstrates how society mandates people’s beliefs using many characters throughout the novel. John, a savage, has never been able to fit in society. Moving through two contradicting societies, John is unable to adapt to the major differences of the civilized society due to the different ways upon how it is conducted....   [tags: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World] 939 words
(2.7 pages)
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Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World - As the story begins, Savage is attempting to free the Deltas by freeing them of their drug addiction. To Savage freedom includes the ability to make rational decisions but the Deltas have no ability to rationalize due to their genetic make-up. As Savage is throwing a way the drugs one of his friends, an Alpha who is capable of reason, approaches him but is stopped by reason. Reason prevents him from helping his friend due to indecision and the inability to calculate the action that will create the best outcome....   [tags: aldous huxley]
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761 words
(2.2 pages)
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Aldous Huxley's Hyperion To A Satyr - Aldous Huxley's Hyperion To A Satyr Ever since the beginning of mankind’s intellectual evolution, we have felt the need to segregate ourselves from others who we deem pathetic, smelly, and filthy. This separation resultsin two different social groups, the upper class and the lower class. Between these two groups is the great gulf that separates us, the gulf that, according to Huxley’s "Hyperion To A Satyr", prevents humans from achieving the brotherlylove that we need to find our ‘Hyperion’, or place of perfection....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Hyperion Satyr Essays] 1031 words
(2.9 pages)
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Aldous Huxley’s Hyperion to a Satyr - We’ve probably all seen a poor, homeless man on the streets. How do we know that he is poor. Is it his personality. I think we all know that the reason we assume that this man is poor is because of his appearance. If we see a man whose clothes are old, torn or dirty, we assume that theman is poor, and because of this, many people view himas a lower form oflife, and not as an equal. Throughout the historyofhuman civilization,dirt has been a very common symbol that humans havecometo associate withthe poor or lower classes in our society....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Hyperion to a Satyr] 1676 words
(4.8 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Distortion is an image. An illusion of a thought or an idea that appears to have a single affect on a society; however, it provides an image on society that is completely different....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley] 967 words
(2.8 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Humans have transformed their social organization, time and time again. Social separation has existed since the Neolithic Revolution. Very recently, we have begun to head down a dangerous path to what we can call a Brave New World. A “Brave New World” is one in which those in charge begin to intrude on the lives of individuals to the extent that the government has so much control that it begins to create human beings artificially. This path first started with encroaching technologies such as cameras and wire-tapping....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 1118 words
(3.2 pages)
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's Brave New World I stood in front of the television screen in horror and disbelief at 10 o'clock on September 11, 2001. Watching as the second plane struck the World Trade Center in a fiery ball of destruction, I thought for sure that this world as we know it was coming to an abrupt end. Seeing the first tower fall and then the second, with over 100 stories each now a pile of twisted steel and death made me want to vomit. In two short hours, the stability of America’s foundation became questionable....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 1367 words
(3.9 pages)
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Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World by Aldous Huxley was published in 1932 after two major global events- World War Two from 1914-1918 and The Great Depression of 1929-1933. These two events changed the way people saw the world and made people see the events were beyond the control of individuals and even governments. Also at this time the world was seeing the rise in technology and the view that science could help solve some of the problems. Much of the technology has been developed because of the war and the mass of people had suffered because of it....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley Essays] 2288 words
(6.5 pages)
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The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Since the first day that humans were put on this earth, they have been curious and have searched for ways to become more efficient. Throughout the years they have created tools to better serve them, created clothing to keep them warm, built homes to protect them from the elements, and produced transportation methods to transport them across the world. In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932), the human race has evolved to being extremely efficient in everything that they do....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley]
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2109 words
(6 pages)
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Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World One may think that the society in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a gross representation of the future, but perhaps our society isn’t that much different. In his foreword to the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisioned this statement when he wrote: "To make them love it is the task assigned, in present-day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda...." Thus, through hypnopaedic teaching (brainwashing), mandatory attendance to community gatherings, and the use of drugs to control emotions, Huxley bitterly satirized the society in which we live....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World] 864 words
(2.5 pages)
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The High Cost of Stability in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - The High Cost of Stability in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Conditioning the citizens to like what they have and reject what they do not have is an authoritative government’s ideal way of maximizing efficiency. The citizens will consume what they are told to, there will be no brawls or disagreements and the state will retain high profits from the earnings. People can be conditioned chemically and physically prior to birth and psychologically afterwards. The novel, Brave New World, takes place in the future, 632 A....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World]
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3903 words
(11.2 pages)
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Huxley: Family Life Is Very Much Feared Within The Utopian Society - Within one of his most controversial yet compelling literary works, Aldous Huxley never fails to create a masterpiece of interwoven plots, characters, philosophies, and dilemmas faced by the citizens of the supposed Utopia. Upon first glance, the reader is entirely mesmerized by Huxley’s extraordinary ability to construct a world unlike any other; a world complete with fully complacent citizens, political stability, and even an organized system of social class. However, as the reader progresses further into the book, they are at once shocked by the misconception that the citizens live in a perfect world....   [tags: Aldous Huxley ] 785 words
(2.2 pages)
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Biography of Aldous Huxley - Aldous Leonard Huxley was born, in the English countryside, on July 26, 1894 to Leonard and Julia Huxley. He was their third child. His siblings were Julian, Trevenen, and Margaret. His father was the son of T. H. Huxley, a brilliant scientist, and his mother, Julia, was the great-niece of Matthew Arnold, a poet-philosopher. He was unusual and bright but not immediately academically distinguished (Hara 4). His mother had started a school for girls and that is where Huxley first started to bloom....   [tags: writer, love, technology] 1764 words
(5 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World was written by Aldous Huxley in 1931. It is set in the future and portrays the negative effects of a controlled government on society. This timeless novel also shows the effects of increased technology, psychological manipulation and uniformity in society. Huxley predicts what the world will be like in AD 2450. The vast majority of the population is controlled under the World State; a peaceful, stable society where there is an abundance of goods because their economy is based off of commercialism....   [tags: government, society, control]
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1465 words
(4.2 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley was a British writer. He was born on July 26, 1894, and died on November 22, 1963. He was most known for his fifth novel, Brave New World, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Huxley was born in Godalming in the Surrey County in southern England. Huxley was the son of an English schoolteacher, Julia Arnold, and a writer, Leonard. Huxley intended to become a doctor. But having contracted keratitis, which is an eye disease resulting in near blindness, he was forced to change his profession....   [tags: biography, profession, awards] 910 words
(2.6 pages)
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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley - In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, a haunting warning of a possible future for the world is presented to readers. The novel’s world is composed of dystopian strata plagued by a dependence on drugs, technology, and a well-defined social class system. Huxley’s uncanny foresight specific to segregation and social class strata is startling because readers do not expect to find aspects of Brave New World’s segregation and class structure in modern-day American society. Although it was written in the mid-1930s, Huxley’s Brave New World contains themes of blatant segregation and a tiered social class system similar to that of contemporary society....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Theme, Society]
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1497 words
(4.3 pages)
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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley explores the concept of a utopian and human perfection in his novel, Brave New World. The story is about a world in which controllers have created order for the citizens of the world. They have also gained obedience from practically every person. Children are no longer born, they are grown. In these factories, children are conditioned and brainwashed into becoming whatever the Controllers, the leaders of this global government, wish them to be. As such a society in which everyone has a place and a purpose is born....   [tags: Community, Identity, Stability]
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746 words
(2.1 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is far more relevant today and has a higher possibility of actually transpiring in the near future compared to George Orwell’s 1984. Even though both of the two, which are totalitarian societies, are based on plausible premises, the utopia illustrated in Brave New World still has a opportunity to appear today, while the “Big Brother” controlled society presented in George Orwell’s 1984, being based off of totalitarian societies to some extent that existed at the time the book was written, is simply obsolete....   [tags: Utopia, Analysis] 743 words
(2.1 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - ... Currently in today's society we still view those with birth defects as abnormal and do not consider them as part of society because they are not normal. As with Bernard the alphas view him inferiorly, because of this Bernard despises all those in the World State and critizies their motives and desires. Bernard is not similar to the citizens in the World State because he is lovesick for Lenina who sees nothing in him except social gain, he becomes very jealous of men around Lenina making him fiercely angry because he still has sexual desires but does not advance in them....   [tags: exile, alienated, bernard marx] 706 words
(2 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World Analysis 1/3 1) One of the biggest conflicts witnessed so far in the first 90 pages of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is the internal one within the main protagonist, Bernard Marx. Throughout the book, Bernard encounters a violent conflict within himself. He was born different from everyone else, and he finds himself many times questioning the system, he feels that there is much more to be/accomplish in life than just having sex and playing ‘obstacle golf’. Bernard is conflicted if he should share how he feels with the rest of the world and reveal his thoughts, or if he should just keep his mouth shut because all he really wants is to fit in....   [tags: bernard marx, utopian society] 1328 words
(3.8 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - In 1932, after the First World War new enhancements in technological practices and government control were now in effect. Aldous Huxley was one of the many citizens who wrote literature to describe what future life would entail. Huxley wrote, in the novel, Brave New World that the ideals that were significant in the past will no longer be important in the future. Throughout the last few decades world view has become trivial about everything people think, act and speak about. All events that occur within Brave New World happen because the World State wants to have better government control over the individuality and happiness that the citizens possess....   [tags: drugs, self-inflicted deaths]
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1069 words
(3.1 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Theme or Concept Examined in Brave New World “Brave New World,” is a novel written by Aldous Huxley where he explains that everything is based on a futuristic science which he claimed sprang forth from him because of his experience as “an ordered universe in a world of plan less incoherence” (River 4 1974). People seem to care more about temporal things rather than emotions. Technology also seems to be the most important aspect and everyone is affected by it in one way or another, whether if it is negative or positive....   [tags: futuristic science, westernized, technocracy]
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993 words
(2.8 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World illustrates a perfect society: “community, identity, stability” (Huxley 7). This superb environment, however, is only achieved through the dehumanization of each individual. The world is run by world-controllers, a powerful oligarchy, whom have successfully brainwashed, or conditioned, children for the sole purpose of controlling their minds (Biderman 549). In result, individuals have lost their ability to think and act for themselves. Children are stripped of human rights, even before conditioning, by being a product of governmental test tube reproduction....   [tags: community, dehumanization, brainwashing]
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1306 words
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - ... Even after birth they continue to follow the motto of the World State: “Community, Identity, Stability”(21). This motto is extremely ironic having the words identity and stability in it as the World State has sacrificed identity for stability. Shock therapy is also used to force children to hate certain objects. The director explains, “They'll grow up with what the psychologists used to call an ‘instinctive' hatred of books and flowers. Reflexes unalterably conditioned"(26). This entire process is sustained by the distribution of the drug soma, aka the miracle drug....   [tags: individualism, bio mechanical technology] 863 words
(2.5 pages)
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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley - ... He demonstrates the idea of a “community”, which is when all the people in his society work together for the goal of happiness; this is achieved by separating the population into segments. When separating the people into groups like Alphas who were intellectually superior to Epsilons who did manual labor he set in the idea of “identity.” Whichever identity a person is assigned they are brainwashed to be happy with whom they are in the Condition Centre, which all goes down to the government’s goal of “stability.” Stability is achieved through limitations on intelligence making the person more suiting for their future job....   [tags: literary analysis, totalitarianism] 623 words
(1.8 pages)
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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley - The story of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley depicts a utopian society conflicted by stability. People are oblivious to the morals and ethics upheld by their ancestors 600 years before and, in turn, are demoralized. Babies are born in laboratories, relationships last no longer than "bedtime", and drugs are provided by government for daily use by their citizens. The drug, "soma" symbolizes estatic rapture experienced by the gloomy looking for escape, material religion for those looking for comfort from a supernatural force, abused aphrodisiac for lovers looking to have a good time, and complete technocracy from a government using a controlled substance to dominate the minds of its people....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Summary] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
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Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World - When people think of the progress and advances in the field of science, they are usually under the preconception that most discoveries and advancements in technologies are advantageous. Are these advancements as beneficial to society as people think they are. Or do they just lay raise to confusion between what can be considered morally and ethically permissible. In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley illustrates the dangers of scientific progress and its effects on our society, particularly in the field of biology....   [tags: story analysis, dystopian societies] 1462 words
(4.2 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - A Godless World With Orgies Think about a world where you first experience sex when you’re a little kid. A world where books and flowers might not be respected but you're conditioned to be happy. Conditioned to have sex with anyone you want, whenever you feel like it. It's true that you don't have to worry about violence and when you start feeling stressed, all you have to take is soma (a drug that creates pleasure and happiness.) then feel better. In the story, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, that’s how their world worked and I do not believe that our world will ever come to a point like it....   [tags: sex experience, prostitution business, violence]
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1015 words
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World, a novel written by Aldous Huxley, can be compared and contrasted with an episode of The Twilight Zone, a fantasy, science-fiction television series, called “Number 12 Looks Just Like You.” Brave New World is a highly regarded and renowned work of literature as The Twilight Zone is considered one of the greatest television series of all time. Brave New World and The Twilight Zone’s episode “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” can be compared and contrasted on the basis of science, youth, and the government....   [tags: twilight zone, science-fiction]
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1024 words
(2.9 pages)
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World is a book written by Aldous Huxley in 1932. This novel has been praised and condemned over time. It questions the way society is run today; the individual is sacrificed for the state, and science is the main focus for control. This book is a masterpiece of science fiction and also dystopian literature. The people in the society live dehumanized lives, and everything in the society is negative due to the interference of a higher power. It is evident that America today is evolving into the world state, just like in the book....   [tags: book review, story and character analysis]
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849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Aldous Huxley And The Brave New World - Within any novel, there are always elements taken directly from the author's life and experiences. Their thoughts and opinions will also be imparted to the novel, delivering a direct message to the reader and perhaps arguing their opinions, to persuade the audience. These influences on and from his environment are apparent in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. In the 1930's, the time the book was written, many world-scale events were taking place, and society was changing as a whole. All of this no doubt affected Huxley, and resulted in one the most powerful, thought provoking novels....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley] 1433 words
(4.1 pages)
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Aldous Huxley’s Warning to America - A dystopia- “an imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror” (Dystopia). Aldous Huxley demonstrates just that in his book Brave New World. In Brave New World Huxley creates a perfectly stable society through using clones. This society achieved this stability through the administering and conditioning of the brain. Huxley an extreme humanist feared this future society because of the work of other extremist with theories that could not be proven (Chunk) Sigmund Freud known as he father of psychoanalysis, was a physiologist, medical doctor, and influential thinker of the early twentieth century” (Thornton), he came up with...   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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2295 words
(6.6 pages)
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - How valuable is the protection of individuality. In a society dominated by falsified, scientifically manufactured happiness, individuality proves a rarity. Aldous Huxley’s speculative novel, Brave New World, demonstrates the consequences of this type of impassive society. Bernard, Helmholtz, and John are all unique from their peers, and they think individually as a result. Because of their individuality, the group is ultimately banned from civilization and sent to a remote location. Being segregated because of appearance or mental capacity and not subject to society’s influences stimulates individuality; however, the knowledge and truth correlating with individuality comes at a price, in thi...   [tags: story and literary analysis]
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1035 words
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley brings a futuristic novel, riddled with human follies and satire. Huxley wrote during the progressive and post-depression periods, which is reflected by the issues in which he satirizes. Brave New World is a futuristic novel that explores the hypothetical advancements of technology and effects or improvements on society. The novel sets a social system similar to that of medieval England in which people are “born” into castes. This sets the stage for the numerous social battles, which ensue as the novel develops....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley] 1263 words
(3.6 pages)
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Huxley's Message in Brave New World - Huxley's Hidden Message Aldous Huxley has a humanistic, deep and enlightened view of how society should be, and of what constitutes true happiness. In his novel, Brave New World, he shows his ideas in a very obscure manner. Huxley presents his ideas in a satirical fashion. This sarcastic style of writing helped Huxley show his views in a very captivating and insightful manner. The entire novel describes a dystopia in which intimate relationships, the ability to choose one's destiny, and the importance of family are strictly opposed....   [tags: Aldous Huxley] 974 words
(2.8 pages)
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"The Doors of Perception" by Aldous Huxley - "The Doors of Perception" by Aldous Huxley The Doors of Perception, written by Aldous Huxley in 1954 was the first essay of its kind to deal with not only the physical effects of mescaline but also attempted to rationalize the fundamental needs satisfied by the drug by its takers. Mescaline is the active chemical in peyote, a wild cactus that grows in the American Southwest and Northern Mexico. Huxley volunteered to boldly go where few Americans other than chemists, native Americans, and researchers dared to go by ingesting synthesized mescaline in a controlled experiment to measure it's psychological effects....   [tags: Papers] 866 words
(2.5 pages)
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Brave New World: The Destruction of Family - Is the push for a perfect utopia enough to siphon motherhood, family, and love. As in Brave New World, Aldous Huxley illustrates the destruction of the idea of family in this ’perfect world‘. People in the world today have the ability to express love and obtain a family. Huxley explores the futuristic outlook on a world (in many ways similar to ours) that would not allow such humanistic traits. Science is so called the ’father of progress’ and yet the development of Fordism and the evolution of artificial fertilization deteriorates the social value of science....   [tags: Aldous Huxley]
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1486 words
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A Reflection on Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Literature is both shaped by our culture and shapes it. Because of this it is an effective representation of the culture of a time. One can tell how people were affected by the events of the times by how it comes through in their writing. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is a prime example of this. The work was targeted at people in a post WWI world. This is a time between WWI and WWII where the world is still shocked by how rapidly the science of war had advanced. People also continue to be appalled with the mass death of a World War caused by such technology and therefore yearn for a more stable world....   [tags: Brave New World Literary Analysis ]
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1607 words
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Outcasts in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley once wrote, “If one's different, one's bound to be lonely.” This is clearly a statement about public acceptance and tolerance of dissimilar people. Aldous’ beliefs can be seen in his book, Brave New World by two outcast characters, John Savage and Bernard Marx. Bernard and John are both outspoken about their ideas on society, but differ in their actions when faced with temptations. Although many citizens are conditioned to appreciate the community they live in, both Bernard and John are frank and communicate their controversial views openly....   [tags: controversial, citizens, government, society]
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539 words
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Aldous Huxley’s Dystopia as Relating to Society Today - Technology is the application of scientific knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means and their interrelation with life, society, and the environment. It concerns itself with such subjects as industrial arts, engineering, applied science and pure science and is utilized for practical purposes. Though technology offers a variety of gadgets that work to the advance of humanity, it can also harm society extensively by dispersing a certain degree of power to individuals that can be abused....   [tags: George Orwell, Contrasts]
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767 words
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Overview of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - In Aldous Huxley's self-created dystopian society, controlled by biotechnology, genetics are edited to perfection and babies are manufactured in bottles through Ectogenesis1. After visiting America in the Roaring Thirties, Huxley admired the confidence, vitality, and "generous extravagance" he found in American life and the American people. However, he began to see the destructive spiral that Totalitarianism had on society, especially with his experiences in Italy under the reign of fascist leader Benito Mussolini (Barron's Educational Series)....   [tags: genetics, biotechnology, conditioning]
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1089 words
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Overuse of Antidepressants Today and How Aldous Huxley Predicted It - ... Part of the high growth in the usage of antidepressants was because doctors were prescribing the drug to children younger than 6. The number of “antidepressant prescriptions written for teens increases every year” (Mitchell). That statistic should be going down because teenagers do not know if they are really depressed or if they just had a bad day. By the doctor just giving them medicine teenagers will never learn how to deal with their problems and how to fix certain situation. By prescribing the medication children and teens are learning how to take the easy way out, by resorting to taking drugs....   [tags: A Brave New World]
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998 words
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Value in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Value in Brave New World What is value. To take a logical standpoint, it could be defined as the monetary worth of something: a candy bar’s value is one dollar. But to most people, value is more far reaching than a number. To chocolate lovers, a candy bar’s value is a few minutes of bliss; the chocolate hits your tongue and melts; the overwhelming decadence of that smooth, velvety sweetness is enough to keep you happy for the rest of the day. So, value is all about perspective, and it is also a driving force in motivation: value drives people....   [tags: benito hoover, industrial revolution]
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2808 words
(8 pages)
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A Brave New World: Was Aldous Huxley Correct? - A Brave New World, written by Aldous Huxley, is a book that to me is more of a warning then entertainment. In the book, Huxley writes about a future civilization and all how everything in life is simplified. Babies are created in factories and are designed however scientists want them to be. Relationships are completely irrelevant and frowned upon in this world. People are distracted from true beauty and left to submit their selves into a false world. Since this book was written in 1931, Huxley obviously had no knowledge of new age technology....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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1442 words
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The Dystopian Society of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a dystopia for many reasons, as citizens are deprived of freedom, programmed to be emotionless and under the control of a corrupt dictatorship....   [tags: story analysis, sociological analysis] 1182 words
(3.4 pages)
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The World State in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Happiness is what every human seeks; its human nature. Happiness, however one defines it as, can come at a price. Societies all around the world view happiness differently, but in a futuristic novel, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, happiness is supposedly an inevitable feeling gained at the cost of freedom. This novel explores a “World State” in which the majority of the society feels no strong emotion, complies with their assigned caste, and behave almost identically to the next person (Huxley, 220)....   [tags: happiness, thought, society]
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920 words
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley and Technology - “COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY”: this is the World State's motto in a science fiction novel “Brave New World” written by Aldous Leonard Huxley in 1932. Huxley predicts the future world ironically, and I assume everyone hopes his prediction will not come true. Fortunately, Huxley’s brave new world is just a fictional world; no one knows whether Huxley’s brave new world will become a reality or not. However, technology improves rapidly and scares people that their world is gradually approaching to Huxley’s brave new world....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Community, Identity]
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1622 words
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Utopian Society in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - “There is always soma, delicious soma, half a gramme for a half-holiday, a gramme for a week-end, two grammes for a trip to the gorgeous East, three for a dark eternity on the moon, returning whence they find themselves on the other side of the crevice, safe on the solid ground of daily labour and distraction, scampering from feely to feely, from girl to pneumatic girl, from Electromagnetic Golf course to …" Huxley implies that by abrogating dreadfulness and mental torment, the brave new worlders have disposed of the most significant and brilliant encounters that life can offer also....   [tags: Pharmaceudicas, Drugs]
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Satire in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Aldous Huxley. The very name summons psychedelic visions and utopian nightmares to the western psyche. He was born on the 26th of July in 1894, and died on the 22nd of November 1963. He saw the turn of the century, two world wars, the decline of the British lion, the ascendance of the American eagle and the Cuban missile crisis. In short, he lived through some of the most unstable times man has seen as a species. His work was varied. He began his career as a satirist of the class system he endured in England....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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1235 words
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The Importance of Decisions Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - At one point or another everyone has been a witness to that strange boy in the corner of the grocery store spending an hour choosing candy. Every time you pass him, his determined and focused expression catches your eye and you can't resist the curiosity as to why this crazy kid still is so focused on choosing the best possible way to get a cavity. The reasons may be simple, but reasons happen in consequence of life influences. Likewise the boy's influence could be his amazing goal setting that his mother taught him and because of that he finds it special in his own way to find the best candy bar for the best satisfaction....   [tags: classic, shakespeare]
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Alienation in In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, alienation is a major, well-explored theme. Many examples of alienation are given throughout the book in the form of the many characters that appear in the scope of the novel. Websters Dictionary defines Alienation as “the state of feeling estranged or separated from one's milieu, work, products of work, or self.” This definition of being estranged or separated from their milieu applies greatly to many characters in Huxley’s work. Two great examples are Helmholtz Watson and Mustapha Mond, two of the greatest intellectuals in the entirety of Brave New World....   [tags: Separation, Status quo]
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Plot Development in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - ... On top of that, as a direct result of Bokanovsky’s Process, the creation of humans has fallen into line with the economic principles of supply and demand. For example, when the Hatchery Director is giving a tour to students, the reader is enlightened by what this process entails: …a bokanovskied egg will proliferate, will divide. From eight to ninety-six buds, and every bud will grow into a perfectly formed embryo and every embryo into a full-sized adult. Making ninety-six human beings grow where only one grew before… (p....   [tags: society, economics, dehumanized]
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1344 words
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Modern Society in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - ... Additionally, a way the government controls is through their power of knowledge. Power and knowledge are two forces that work together. They are so linked that they could be considered the same thing. Having knowledge allows the government to teach or in a stronger sense, indoctrinate with what they are aware of or with their interpretations of certain matters in the world but conversely, they can obscure what they know to the public which further adds to the government’s power by having more knowledge....   [tags: totalitarian governments, control] 1732 words
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Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - What happens when society’s greatest love becomes the ultimate threat. A few years ago Neil Postman wrote a preface about the media’s effects in which he suggests that Aldous Huxley’s predictions in Brave New World come to pass. Postman reiterated Huxley’s points saying that our society might eventually turn into a version of Brave New World. Some may argue that Postman’s theory is incorrect but with further consideration it is more likely to be true. In Aldous Huxley’s book, Brave New World features Bernard Marx who questions the aspects of the society that he lives in....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley Many talented twentieth century writers have been overshadowed by classical writers such as Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare. Novels dealing with classical topics are often more recognized than works that tackle controversial topics. Aldous Huxley defies this stereotype, for his controversial works gained great fame while influencing many people. Huxley was not just a successful writer; he was a complex person whose ideas and novels influenced many people. Aldous Huxley was born July 26, 1894 (It’s Online-Aldous Huxley) in Godalming, Surrey, England (Aldous (Leonard) Huxley)....   [tags: Biography Biographies]
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - The use of “Brave New Worlds” John allows powerful insight into the deep-rooted flaws of society. John’s character allows for the establishment of character ideals, as he is the only one to have a relevant view of what life outside of the domineering society of the Brave New World. Huxley allows these view to shine, as illustrated by John’s infatuation with this new world, his them dissatisfaction and isolation, and finally his eventual suicide the World State is demonstrated, meaningful relationship, high art, and true raw human emotion and a higher religious power....   [tags: flaws, society, savage world]
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - From reading Fukuyama’s Our Posthuman Future I gathered that if the human mind and body are shaped by tons of genes, as the decoding of the human genome seems to highlight, then biotechnologist will be able to change both one day in searching to perfect the flawed human clay, will modify human nature. Fukuyama asserts his thoughts about what in fact is at stake with biotechnology in which he states, “Is…the very grounding of the human moral sense”. Throughout the reading it became clear that Fukuyama’s purpose was not to delineate the consequences of biotechnology, but to argue that biotechnology threatens both the very distinction of a human being and the existing social fabric....   [tags: capitalism, fukuyama] 966 words
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - ... If the same trend persists, Huxley fears that the teachings of God might not be in existence among future generations. Huxley also confirms the popular argument that modern society is surrendering their culture to emerging social and economic development. The novel presents a perfect and reliable example of techno-poly. The novel describes a society that puts more emphasis on advancing industrial beliefs and abandoning traditional and religious teachings. In contemporary society, human beings get an education on the importance of embracing emerging social changes instead of enriching their cultural beliefs and standings....   [tags: theme, context analysis]
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1411 words
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Aldous Huxley - When Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World in 1931, nobody imagined that his fairytale story would someday be a reality. It is almost scary to see how accurate Huxley’s far-fetched fantasies came to be. When Huxley wrote about the conformity, drug use and sex and technology of the society, he was almost pinpoint exact to predicting today’s societies. Unfortunately, all of these things haven’t exactly changed our society today for the better. It is amazing to see how accurately Aldous Huxley was in his predictions to human conformity today....   [tags: essays research papers] 1103 words
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Aldous Huxley - Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley: English novelist, essayist, critic, and poet. On July 26, 1894, Aldous was born of Leonard and Julia Huxley in England. The infamous Huxley family possessed both scientific and literary fame throughout Europe. As a teenage, Aldous developed a bizarre eye disease which left him blind for over two years. This traumatic event changed Aldous's career as a medical doctor to a writer instead. "…I should infallibly have killed myself in the much more strenuous profession of medicine." But he was used to work, even in the literary world....   [tags: essays research papers] 686 words
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Aldous Huxley - The English novelist and essayist Aldous Leonard Huxley, b. July 26, 1894, d. Nov. 22, 1963, a member of a distinguished scientific and literary family, intended to study medicine, but was prevented by an eye ailment that almost blinded him at the age of 16. He then turned to literature, publishing two volumes of poetry while still a student at Oxford. His reputation was firmly established by his first novel, Crome Yellow (1921). Huxley's early comic novels, which include Antic Hay (1923), Those Barren Leaves (1925), and Point Counter Point (1928), demonstrate his ability to dramatize intellectual debate in fiction; he discussed philosophical and social topics in a volume of essays, Proper...   [tags: essays research papers] 657 words
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Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World The New World, a man-made Utopia, governed by its motto, Community, Identity, Stability (Huxley 3). A man-made world in every way. Human beings fertilized in bottles. Identity, gender, intelligence, position in society, all predestined. Human beings classified in the order of precedence: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Every one conditioned to be a certain way. Every one works for every one else (Huxley, 74). All man-made to ensure social stability. Is society in the New World truly better than in the 2000s....   [tags: Technology A Brave New World Essays]
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" wrote in 1932 gives the readers his opinion on the dangers and major concerns of the future. In this book he explicitly describes a reality in which humans are mass produced in test-tubes due to advances in science. This insight into the future is both detailed and shocking; the warnings it sends out to its readers are incredibly clear and soon become apparent. In this essay, I aim to explain, in detail, the warnings, risks and why its subject is still relevant for the twenty first century reader....   [tags: Papers] 611 words
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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World, a novel by Aldous Huxley was written at a tine in history when war had ravaged much of the nation, Depression was blanketing society, and people’s wills were being put to the test. Science had become an overwhelming force for better or for worse. People had witnessed science saving and preventing millions of lives with vaccinations and such, but on the contrary, had also witnessed it kill with horrifying “factory-like” efficiency in WW I (the age of machine guns and chemical warfare)....   [tags: Papers] 1229 words
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Brave New World - Within Aldous Huxley’s work of Brave New World, there are two characters, Bernard Marx and Helmholtz Watson that are a part of the world state, but they are isolated and different then everyone else. Bernard and Helmholtz are both Alpha-plus males; they are the highest class within their society. Bernard is physically shorter than all the other alphas, and is insecure about his size and status. Helmholtz on the other hand is very intelligent and physically attractive. Both individuals share a discontent with life in the world state....   [tags: Aldous Huxley] 1077 words
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Aldous Huxley's Brave New World In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley deftly creates a society that is indeed quite stable. Although they are being mentally manipulated, the members of this world are content with their lives, and the presence of serious conflict is minimal, if not nonexistent. For the most part, the members of this society have complete respect and trust in their superiors, and those who don’t are dealt with in a peaceful manner as to keep both society and the heretic happy. Maintained by cultural values, mental conditioning, and segregation, the idea of social stability as demonstrated in Brave New World is, in my opinion, both insightful and intriguing....   [tags: Social Stability Brave New World Essays] 1172 words
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - ... It’s this disposition to so bluntly live life without meaning, however, that makes her role in the novel so important. Lenina, in a sense, is the rest of society. Throughout the novel, Lenina’s character remains constant; therefore, she has not changed in from any two points of the story. Lenina, however, desperately struggles to win over John the Savage. Lenina’s strength and weakness in the novel is her conformity. 4. Helmholtz Helmholtz Watson is a socially superior Alpha-plus lecturer at the College of Emotional Engineering....   [tags: character description, analysis]
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Characters in Huxley's Brave New World - THOMAS / 'TOMAKIN', 'THE DIRECTOR' administrator in the year 632AF of the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. The Director runs a futuristic baby-factory where the assembly-line production of genetic castes is streamlined and controlled, and maturing youngsters are brainwashed via neo-Pavlovian conditioning and hypnopaedia ["sleep-learning"] into being happy with their state-allotted roles in life. The Director is an intelligent but orthodox-minded Alpha; he frowns on Bernard's individualism....   [tags: Aldous Huxley] 1388 words
(4 pages)
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The Downside of Technology Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Brave New World illustrates a utopian societie; however, the utopia Brave New World attempts to create is primarily governed by technological progress. The novel shows that an obsession with technological progress creates a dystopic society. Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World illustrates a utopian society; however, the utopia that Brave New World attempts to create is predominantly governed by technological progress. Throughout the novel, Aldous Huxley shows that an obsession with technological progress creates a flawed and dystopic society....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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531 words
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The Critical Response to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - After writing an incredible novel that to some was quite controversial due to its antigovernment subject, Aldous Huxley became one of the greatest writers of his time with his novel Brave New World. Huxley’s background had a significant influence on his writings and to the subject of his marvelous novel. The period in which Brave New World was written, along with the historical and cultural conditions of the time, also had an immense affect on the work. As an illustrious writer with such a controversial novel, many had their own critical responses to this piece of literature....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]
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The Role of Government and Technology in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Merriam Webster’s definition of satire is a type of literary work used to ridicule human vices and follies. This type of work is presented in Aldous Huxley’s, Brave New World, when criticizing the power and control of the World State through the use of advanced technology towards the members of the World State. Throughout the novel the World State is portrayed as a totalitarian government controlling every aspect of its citizens lives. This controlling is made possible through all the advanced technology available within the World State....   [tags: Brave New World Essays] 648 words
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The Loss of Individuality in the Strive for Power: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - The love of Power and its grasp on humanity is exemplified in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. In Huxley’s dystopian society, access to power is limited; it is allowed only to those who have been conditioned to gain it. "We also predestine and condition. We decant our babies as socialized human beings, as Alphas or Epsilons, as future sewage workers or […] future Directors of Hatcheries." Power in Brave New World initiates from eliminating choice but also from giving the illusion of choice, thus, erasing any conception of choice....   [tags: Subordinate Gender, World State]
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Conspriracy Theory in Aldous Huxley´s Brave New World - Conspiracy theories are brought about when people believe that there is something being covered up that could influence their lives or the lives of the human race. However, most people don’t believe in a ‘conspiracy theory’ because in our culture, we believe in the freedom of information. We are aware of what is happening around us and, although we very indirectly control what is happening, we do have the intelligence and freedom to react to the event. In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, the World State doesn’t allow this freedom of information and suppresses anything that would make humans more aware of their pre-determined lives....   [tags: substance, best, beauty, culture] 1662 words
(4.7 pages)
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Will Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Be Our Brave New World? - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New Word was a revolutionary book when it was published in 1969. Huxley wrote about scientific and technological advances, then considered absurd. Huxley described a revolutionary drug called Soma, which is the reason civilized society was considered civilized. Soma kept people from holding grudges and feeling anger. Societal problems did not exist. The drug made all unpleasant feelings disappear. Soma was happiness in a little pill. The scientists in Brave New World are able to make decisions whether the child would be male or female, tall, athletic, and intelligent or not....   [tags: happiness in a pill, Soma vs Xanax]
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The Use of Technology to Control Society in Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley - Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, portrays a future society where people are no longer individuals but are controlled by the World State. The World State dominates the people by creating citizens that are content with who they are. Brave New World describes how the science of biology and psychology are manipulated so that the government can develop technologies to change the way humans think and act. The World State designs humans from conception for this society. Once the humans are within the society the state ensures all people remain happy....   [tags: medical interventions, emotional relationships]
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1235 words
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Are We Now Living in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World? - “COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY”: this is the World State's motto in a science fiction novel “Brave New World” written by Aldous Leonard Huxley in 1932. Huxley predicts the future world ironically, and I assume everyone hopes his prediction will not come true. Fortunately, Huxley’s brave new world is just a fictional world; no one knows whether Huxley’s brave new world will become a reality or not. However, technology improves rapidly and scares people that their world is gradually approaching to Huxley’s brave new world....   [tags: community, identity, technology, immortality] 1108 words
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The Role of Technology in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World - Technology is a huge factor in the development of societies and cultures. In Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, factors like the tough control over reproduction through technological and medical intervention, and the use of soma by all of the people in the society of the “New World” influence the development of their society. The influence of technology, displays the central theme of the book that technology can shape any society. Technological advancements are the basis of society in the “New World”....   [tags: society, culture, reproduction, intervention]
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629 words
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Conflicting Perspectives in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - Conflicting perspectives are an innate corollary of the subjective human experience. Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' explores disparate representations of events and personalities to give rise to truth and the language in which it is expressed as innately unstable. Moreover, Julius Caesar and Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' offer disparate class perspectives to undermine the possibility of truth as anything but iridescent and personal. Shakespeare evinces perspectives of situations, events and characters as innately conflicting, as the impossibility of a single and stable objective reality comes to advocate the embrace of truth and meaning as endlessly deferred and enigmatic....   [tags: subjective, class, attitude] 973 words
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Satire of the Utopian Future: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - While the knowledge of the world around man may open door to him, it leaves his mind filled with endless thoughts that weigh on him. In Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World, Huxley describes a satiric version of the utopian future where humans are genetically bred and classically conditioned to live passively and happily in their subservient culture. Throughout the novel, this idea of happiness verses knowledge and intelligence is brought before the characters of Huxley’s society. The only way this perfect society flourishes is due to the fact that everyone is the same; all of them working for one common goal, all of them believing one common idea....   [tags: knowledge, god, religion]
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1578 words
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A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley and George Orwell’s 1984 - It is a common belief that the true essence of being human is the right to exercise one’s freedom. The ability of being able to choose permits one to define himself how he sees fit; it allows each person to have his or her own individuality. Living during the same period of Adolf Hitler’s Germany in the middle of the twentieth century, Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World, an unforgiving imagination of Huxley’s worst fears of losing that freedom. In Brave New World, Huxley creates a negative utopia where the people thrive by having the World State dictate their lives through ways of mind control: mind control by the use of technology, mind control by direct control over the mind using soma, a...   [tags: freedom, distopia, control]
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