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My Trip to an Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting - Addiction has become a common affliction. As cliche as it sounds, nothing is further from the truth, alcohol alone is responsible for approximately 1.8 million deaths a year worldwide, which computes to around 3.2% of deaths worldwide. Its estimated that over 76 million people are affected by alcohol use disorders. People abuse it because society looks at alcohol as a normal part of life, in fact it is commonly promoted. Alcohol can impart someone with confidence and happiness or it can spiral them into complete depression and depravity, and all thats needed is a 10 minute drive to the local supermarket to buy whatever appeals to us....   [tags: Alcoholics Anonymous, AA, alcohol, addiction, ] 924 words
(2.6 pages)
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Using Alcoholics Anonymous vs. Abusing Alcoholics Anonymous - Using AA vs. Abusing AA This paper will try to explain the different views of how and why Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step programs are accepted and rejected as effective tools in treating alcoholism and other addictions. The articles reviewed contradict the others’ opinion. First, we see that supporting the 12-step programs with a degree of involvement both the doctor and patient will see better results in treating the addiction. The second view will show that 12-step programs can be used as “self-help” treatment and must be used in conjunction with other forms of rehabilitation....   [tags: Alcoholics Anonymous AA]
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1248 words
(3.6 pages)
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Children of Alcoholics - ... Often times the long-term health problems alcoholics face prove to be much more costly. Some examples of the long-term health problems they have are heart disease, liver damage, cirrhosis, and problems of the kidneys. These are very serious health conditions and hospitalization for them is very expensive. Alcoholics often times have trouble holding jobs. Alcohol can affect a worker’s rate of absence, quality of work, and rate of accidents on the job. This lack of work ethics may lead to job loss....   [tags: Alcohol ]
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885 words
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Alcoholics Anonymous - The phrase “early A.A.” refers to the early fellowships and meetings held in Akron, Ohio. These meetings took place between 1935 and 1939 when Alcoholics Anonymous was an integral part of “A First Century Christian Fellowship” (Pitman 56). A.A. was the outcome of a meeting between Bill W., a New York stockbroker, and Dr. Bob S., an Akron surgeon. Both had been hopeless alcoholics (Fingarette 14). Before this time, Bill and Dr. Bob had each been in contact with the Oxford Group, a mostly nonalcoholic fellowship that emphasized universal spiritual values in daily living(Fingarette 15)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1363 words
(3.9 pages)
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Alcoholics Anonymous - Alcoholics Anonymous When I saw the Alcoholics Anonymous assignment on our syllabus earlier this semester I thought, "Oh my god, I have to go to some stupid AA meeting." In the weeks prior to attending the meeting, I was very nervous about attending it because I did not know what to expect. Some of the questions going through my mind were: "Was everyone expected to talk at the meeting?" and "Was I going to be criticized as the outsider wanting to know what AA was all about?" Those were my two main concerns....   [tags: Papers Alcoholism Drinking Binge Essays ] 1484 words
(4.2 pages)
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High Functioning Alcoholics - ... In 2001 Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the mood, admitted to seeking self help through 12 step programs (Sarah Allen Benton, MS, LMHC). The most notable of all of the people diagnosed with HFA has to be former President George W. Bush. President Bush acknowledged to the public that the term addiction applied to him, he stopped drinking in 1986 (Sarah Allen Benton, MS, LMHC). HFA can go undetected because as stated earlier, most people do not fit the stereo type. Most HFA's are able to hide their alcoholism because of their accomplishments, either in the workforce, education, or family (Everything Addiction)....   [tags: Psychology ]
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907 words
(2.6 pages)
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Alcoholics Generated From Family - Alcoholics Generated From Family Many factors affect the way an adolescent reacts to the peer pressures of substance abuse. Many of these factors can be traced back to the adolescent’s family environment and upbringing. Researchers have described children of alcoholics as victims of an alcoholic family environment characterized by disruption, deviant parental role models, inadequate parenting, and disturbed parent child relationships. (Black.1982) An adolescent’s home and family are their primary source of the concepts of what is considered acceptable for drinking....   [tags: Papers] 1991 words
(5.7 pages)
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Adult Children of Alcoholics - In the United States, twenty million children are experiencing physical, verbal and emotional abuse from parents who are addicted to alcohol. Growing up in an alcoholic house can leave emotional scars that may last a lifetime. This is tragic because we consider that childhood is the foundation on which our entire lives are fabricated. When a child’s efforts to bond with an addicted parent are handicapped, the result is confusion and intense anxiety. In order to survive in a home deficient, of healthy parental love, limits, and consistency, they must develop “survival skills” or defense mechanisms very early in life....   [tags: essays research papers] 1600 words
(4.6 pages)
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Field Study At Alcoholics Anonymous - Field Study At Alcoholics Anonymous On Wednesday March 15 and 22 I attended meetings of the Serentiy Group, a local meeting group of Alcoholics Anonymous that were held at the Congregational Church in East Bridgewater. The meetings started around 8:00 pm and went until each member was given the opportunity to speak, or to share their feelings in some way. There was a total of 15 people present, including myself and my companion. The group was primarily made up of males, there was one female aside from my companion and I....   [tags: Research Alcoholism Drinking Essays] 1066 words
(3 pages)
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Should Alcoholics Be Eligible to Receive Transplant Organs? - ... (Perry) A person, who has trashed their body with alcoholism and required a transplant, should not be eligible for a second transplant if they again were abusing alcohol. Especially over a person, to no fault of their own, is battling a liver disease. In an article from the Canadian Medical Association Journal by E. Kluge, he states that “people who engage in poor lifestyle choices are behaving irresponsibly and could have prevented their illness and are, in essence, increasing the need for organs and depriving people who have no control over their need of necessary treatment.” (Kluge, 2004) People suffering from psychosis, dementia, Down Syndrome, malignant cancers, and continuing substance or not eligible for transplants, active alcoholics are not eligible because of their unhealthy lifestyle would only result in the failure of the new liver....   [tags: Medical Ethics ]
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996 words
(2.8 pages)
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Alcoholics Anonymous Field Visit Report - Alcoholics Anonymous Field Visit Report Alcoholics Anonymous is a self-help organization made up of men and women, young and old, who come together to share their experiences with alcohol, and to express their hope and strength with one another so that they can overcome the illness of alcoholism and then help others to recover. A.A. was first started by two men in 1935. One man from New York, Bill W., who was a stockbroker and another man from Ohio, Dr. Bob who was a surgeon. At one point Bill had wondered how one of his friends had achieved his abstinence, and his friend told him that he achieved it through religion....   [tags: Papers Alcoholism Drinking Essays]
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2152 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism      Alcoholism refers the drinking of alcohol to such a degree that major aspects of one's life are seriously and repeatedly interfered with. These aspects include work, school, family relationships, personal safety and health. Alcoholism is considered a disease. It has known physical, psychological and social symptoms. An alcoholic continues to drink even despite the destructive consequences. Alcoholism is serious and progressive. It can be fatal if not treated. Alcoholism is a very complex disorder....   [tags: Alcoholic Alcoholics] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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Alcoholism and Drinking - Alcoholics Anonymous as an Important Literary Work - Alcoholics Anonymous as an Important Literary Work Alcoholics Anonymous is one of the great unrecognized literary works of the first half of the twentieth century.  It has been through three editions after its first printing in 1939 and at least fifty-three printings in over ninety countries (xxii).  The wide popularity and circulation of the book certainly affirms this claim.  An examination of the contents of the book will show that it also deserves this title.  It is a rich work because it conveys a basic human condition, though ugly, until that time not often spoken of in public.  If it simply did this and nothing more it would merely be a good book.  But it does more than speak to an ugly condition; it gives a blueprint for change.    The human condition which is spoken about in Alcoholics Anonymous is the dichotomy of the life of the alcoholic.  These alcoholics are not easy to categorize; they are not always a Dr Jekyll by day and Mr Hyde by night.  Bill, who explains his life story in the first chapter, explains how he studied economics, business and law to join speculators on Wall Street.  Up until this point, drinking had interfered in his life, but was not a continuous plague.  Yet, over the course of time he becomes an alcoholic for a variety of reasons, like many individuals described throughout the book.  The alcoholics described are not portrayed as unintelligent, unsuccessful or insignificant.  They are men who have high positions, who are by turns "brilliant, fast-thinking, imaginative and likeable" (139).  The conclusion of a prima facie inspection of these individuals would not include over indulgence of alcohol.  But under the alcoholic influence these attributes worthy of note slowly atrophy and wither.  The alcoholic, then, is everywhere, oftentimes unbeknownst to employers and friends.  The book attempts to show this fact.    The book offers no simple "comprehensive picture" of the alcoholic simply because "behavior patterns vary" (22).  Precipitating circumstances are complex, intricate and not all situations play out in the same way.  Bill's story is not the same as Fred's, who works in the accounting firm, nor is Dr Bob's experience the same as Jim, the car salesman.  And it will not be, presumably, the same as the alcoholic readership.  But the central problem with the alcoholic is not, as might be commonly thought, drinking.  Rather it is "his mind, rather than his body" (23).  Alcoholism is a state of mind: an irrationality of the reasons for one's drinking habits.  Alcoholics Anonymous contribution to literature is to define alcoholism and label it not only as a mere problem, but a common problem with its complexity and variety.    Presented throughout the book is a skeleton of events that the reader's gives flesh to with his or her experiences.  He is to decide for himself if he is an alcoholic.  Many described in the book have sought psychiatric and medical treatment, all to no avail.  One great contribution of Alcoholics Anonymous is that it turns treatment inward, succinctly asking the reader: "diagnose yourself" (31).  It is asking the reader to be sincere with himself.  For this same reason, the book asks the reader to believe in a power greater than himself.  If he does this it will allow the reader to recognize his limits, and that he is powerless to control his drinking.  He must be honest with himself if he is to progress any and see himself for who he really is.  Alcoholics Anonymous attempts to aid the reader in honest self-discovery....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 900 words
(2.6 pages)
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An Outsider’s View of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Meetings - An Outsider’s View of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Meetings Today, one out of every thirteen adults abuse alcohol or are alcoholics. That means nearly thirteen million Americans have a drinking problem. (www.niaaa.nih.gov) This topic offers a broad range of ideas to be researched within the psychological field. For this particular project, the topic of alcoholism and the psychological effects on people best fit the criteria. Alcoholism is defined as a disorder characterized by the excessive consumption of and dependence on alcoholic beverages, leading to physical and psychological harm and impaired social and vocational functioning....   [tags: Psychology Sociology Essays]
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722 words
(2.1 pages)
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Alcoholism - A Serious Disease - Alcoholism - A Serious Disease Alcohol is the most used and abused drug in the world, for this reason there is no wonder why we have alcohol problems. The most common problem is alcoholism. Alcoholism is a chronic usually progressive disease that includes both a psychological and a physical addiction to alcohol. Alcoholics know what will happen to them when they drink but they are so addicted they cannot stop drinking. Alcohol becomes the most important part of the person's life. It totally consumes them, all their thoughts and actions have to do are somehow associated with alcohol....   [tags: Alcoholics Drinking Binge Alcohol Essays Papers] 2059 words
(5.9 pages)
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Family Therapy Involving an Alcoholic Parent - ... Also, the well adjusted sister was less likely to have experienced incest or been physically abused, and rated their parent alcoholism as less negative than the impaired sister. This research indicates that counselor’s need to be cognizant that siblings may report different experiences about their parent’s alcoholism and how important social support (Griffin & Amodeo, 1998). . Spouses of Alcoholics Problems Research on Family Therapy and Alcoholism Research on the effectiveness and efficacy of family therapy with alcoholism has found that it is beneficial to embark on therapy by including family members during the initial assessment because it provides for a more multifaceted and accurate understanding of the client (Steinglass, 2008)....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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1636 words
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The Role of Religion in the Alcoholic Anonymous Program - “Alcoholic Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism (Alcoholic Anonymous, p. 1).” Spiritually is believed to play a major role in helping members of Alcoholic Anonymous remain sober. It is suggested that Alcoholic Anonymous and the inclusion of religion is based on a suggestion Carl Jung made to one of his alcoholic patient. Carl Jung was a psychiatrist who at times worked with persons suffering from alcoholism....   [tags: Psychology] 1022 words
(2.9 pages)
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My Name is, and I'm an Alcoholic - My Name is, and I'm an Alcoholic "I had my first drink when I was about five years old…from then on, alcohol was my constant companion, friend, and spiritual advisor…25 years later…I laid in the middle of my living room with a loaded rifle in my mouth wanting to end it all" (Alfred). Alcoholism is a chronic disease in which a person may become dependent on alcohol, to the extent where it affects your life. Alcoholics have an uncontrollable need for alcohol. Their lives revolve around drinking, which dominates the way that they think, feel, and act (Alcohol Use and Abuse)....   [tags: Papers] 781 words
(2.2 pages)
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Defining Who an Alcoholic Is and What the Effects of Alcohol on that Person Are - Defining Who an Alcoholic Is and What the Effects of Alcohol on that Person Are Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives....   [tags: Papers] 2001 words
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Alcohol, Drinking, and Alcoholism - Confessions of a Teen Alcoholic - Confessions of a Teen Alcoholic The beginning, was innocent in appearance - merely a bottle of my father's beer, in order to calm myself before the big exam. My first drink, an experiment recommended by a friend in the senior class, was meant only as a last resort - I needed to pass this test, you realize. Ah, but how that amber liquid metamorphosed to pure silk in my mouth, sloshing down my throat at first, quickly changing to a tender caress. The first sip, followed by a second, and a third, and so on in rapid sequence....   [tags: Personal Narrative Essays] 616 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Horror of Alcoholism - The Horror of Alcoholism Alcoholism is a baffling and powerful disease. It affects all people from all walks of life. It has been medically proven and recognized by most of society as a disease. However, for some people who either have not been affected or just do not have any knowledge of the disease, it is considered more as a weakness of character. Alcoholism has many effects, on the alcoholic them self, towards their family and friends, and on their health, on their spouse and children, mentally and physically, but the good thing is there is help out there for all of these people....   [tags: Alcohol Drinking Alcoholic Essays]
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2578 words
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Media Essay - It’s Time to Ban the Advertising of Alcoholic Beverages - Media Essay - It’s Time to Ban the Advertising of Alcoholic Beverages Everywhere we go, we're bombarded by all sorts of advertisements. We can seldom go through one day without receiving at least one phone call from a telemarketer. Turn on the TV for 15 or 20 minutes and you'll see at least one 5-minute commercial break. Advertisements are abundant everywhere we go: alongside roads, at airports, and at train stations. Why is advertising so popular, why do so many companies pump millions of dollars each year into advertising....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays]
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1335 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcoholism refers to the drinking of alcoholic beverages to such a degree that major aspects of an individual's life--such as work, school, family relationships, or personal safety and health--are seriously and repeatedly interfered with. Alcoholism is considered a disease, meaning that it follows a characteristic course with known physical, psychological, and social symptoms. The alcoholic continues to consume alcohol despite the destructive consequences. Alcoholism is serious, progressive, and irreversible....   [tags: Drinking AAA Binge Drinking Alcoholic Essays]
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1588 words
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Alcoholic Beverage Advertising - Alcoholic Beverage Advertising There is a big debate about the legality of alcoholic beverage advertising on television these days. As we are all centered upon the stereotypical upon the perfect human being, there are instances with alcohol that gives shame to our names. Does this give us the right to ban advertising on such a product. That is the question we ask ourselves every day. When we flip on the television and are watching a show that we adore, whether it be a sports game, or a criminal scenario, there are always ads on the television for products....   [tags: Business Marketing Alcohol] 859 words
(2.5 pages)
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I Am an Alcoholic - I Am an Alcoholic Alcohol abuse has been an issue in my life for quite some time now. I had my first “taste” at the age of fifteen, and from that moment on I was hooked. My father is an alcoholic, as was his father, and I was apparently unfortunate enough to be born with that same gene that quite possibly led to their self-destructive, difficult to break, habit. It took five years of belligerent drunkenness, trouble with the law, broken relationships, and denial for me to realize that I am an alcoholic....   [tags: essays research papers] 1280 words
(3.7 pages)
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Advertising Alcoholic Beverages to Children - Advertising Alcoholic Beverages to Children Alcohol manufacturers use a variety of unscrupulous techniques to advertise alcoholic beverages to children. Perhaps the worst example is Anheuser-Busch Co., the world's largest brewer, which uses child-enticing cartoon images of frogs, dogs, penguins and lizards in ads for Budweiser beer. These Budweiser cartoon characters are hugely popular with children, just like Joe Camel ads. A KidCom Marketing study once found these Budweiser cartoon character ads were American children's favorite ads....   [tags: Advertisements Alcohol Media Essays] 1300 words
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Comparison of Two Different Alcoholic Advertisements - Comparison of Two Different Alcoholic Advertisements (Castlemaine XXXX and Boddingtons) Advertising is the key to selling any product today, and convincing the shopper to buy your product is the way to success. Advertising is available today in many different shapes and forms, for example in newspapers, magazines, and on television. It was not until the 1950's when commercial television started being broadcasted did we see the first television adverts appear advertising cleaning products....   [tags: Papers] 486 words
(1.4 pages)
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Investigating Alcoholic Fermentation and the Affects of Yeast on Dough - Biology Lab Report Investigating Alcoholic Fermentation and the Affects of Yeast on Dough Aim: The aim was simply to investigate whether or not yeast had any affect on causing dough to rise when baked and to experiment with alcoholic fermentation eg. to see if it gave off carbon dioxide. Introduction: Following a few weeks of fermentation theory, groups of three to four were assigned and told to conduct a series of experiments involving the affects of fermentation. My group consisted of myself, Won Jin, Brendan and Sun-Ho and we chose to investigate alcoholic fermentation and the affects of yeast on dough, more specifically to see if yeast caused the dough to rise in anyway....   [tags: essays research papers] 952 words
(2.7 pages)
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Families Find Hope in Their Communities - ... The book adopted the spiritual guidance of the Oxford Group as twelve step program (Anonymous World Services, Inc., 2012). The twelve step program teaches alcoholics to reach out and entrust their life to a higher power to overcome alcohol, which they once fell victim to and were powerless. Once they accept this higher power it will guide them and restore them to sanity. They also need to take a good look at their moral inventory. Alcoholics need to admit to the higher power of their wrong doings....   [tags: Counseling ]
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2045 words
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The Alcoholic Father Revealed in the Film, William Faulkner: A Life on Paper - The Alcoholic Father Revealed in the Film, William Faulkner: A Life on Paper While listening to William Faulkner’s daughter, Jill, attempt to describe her father’s personality, I recognized the desire to defend and protect the memory of a provider who was ultimately unknowable to her. It seemed as if each phrase was tentatively spoken as a way of avoiding being untruthful. Mostly, I recognized the inability to truly know an alcoholic parent. I repeat the word ‘recognize’ intentionally. I lived with an alcoholic until I was ten....   [tags: Faulkner Moses] 665 words
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The Role of Essential Amino Acids, Micronutrients and Antioxidant Status in Alcoholic and Tropical Chronic Pancreatitis - This investigation was undertaken to examine the role of essential amino acids, micronutrients and antioxidant status in alcoholic and tropical chronic pancreatitis and to compare with healthy controls. A further goal is to estimate serum rhodanese, thiocyanate and urinary inorganic sulfate/cratinine ratio as a measure of detoxification of cyanogens. Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with irreversible exocrine insufficiency, which in due course may cause fibrosis and diabetes mellitus and with significantly increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer....   [tags: Medical Science] 877 words
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Peoples Drinking. - Alcoholism refers to the abuse of alcohol by individuals who are unable to control their binge drinking behavior over a prolonged period of time. Alcoholics are not simply people who consume alcohol; instead, their entire lives revolve around alcohol. While many people usually dismiss the effects of heavy drinking to a hangover that will not last beyond the day, the effects of alcoholism are infinitely more enduring and devastating not only for the alcoholics, but also for their families and friends....   [tags: essays research papers] 1674 words
(4.8 pages)
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Creative Writing: Loving an Alcoholic - Will he be blue. Is he dead. At the doorway, momentarily, I hesitated. Should I continue. Should I call the police instead. Should I even be here, pondering over to help the man who constantly abused his children and deserved to die. Should I. The children?s pale faces came to mind suddenly. The hollowness of their stares. The frightened gleam in their eyes, the hopelessness in their expressions. They?d already been unwillingly dragged into this chaos. They had no choice over the matter. If they can do this, why can?t you....   [tags: Creative Writing Essay] 1113 words
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Alcohol Consumption in College - Alcohol Consumption in College Incomplete Paper Alcoholic beverages such as beer can cause problems for many people throughout life, but for college aged people alcohol can cause the worst. In college most people are being out on their own for the first time ever and having that freedom they have never had. Some problems caused by alcohol in college are, missing an assignment or class, or even death. Drinking a beer a day has been found healthy, but in college that is never the case. Not that everyone drinks or everyone drinks a lot but there is always that select group that will drink more nights out of a week than not....   [tags: Alcoholic Beverages Health College Essays] 3550 words
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Alcohol and Alcoholism - Alcohol and Alcoholism Alcohol is a drug, but unlike the other drugs, marijuana, cocaine, heroine, and probably all the others for some reason this is socially accepted and is legal. Alcohol is bad for you and does have long term affects associated with it. Such as the long addiction to it, effects on the body, and the social interaction effects. Alcohol, and alcoholism is common in America, but drinking is more common around kids. Social drinking a term kids and drinkers have come accustom to, social drinking is defined by one standard drink per hour, and no more than 3 per day, but some people just socialize around people that drink as heavily as they do and confuse that for social drinking....   [tags: Drinking Binge Alcoholic Effects Essays] 696 words
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Alcohol - 1. What is alcoholism. 2. How do people become alcoholics. 3. What are the effects of alcoholism, on both the alcoholic and their family. 4. How do you diagnose alcoholism. 5. Is there a cure for alcoholics. 6. What is the treatment. What is Alcoholism. Alcoholism can be defined as the dependency on alcohol; addiction to alcohol. It is a chronic disease, this disease called alcoholism is progressive and potentially fatal. “ In 1966 the American Medical Association (AMA) declared Alcoholism a disease, but it is still judged morally by society” said Father Martin....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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General Theory of Alcoholism - General Theory of Alcoholism There are many theories of alcoholism, and some approaches explain and treat certain alcoholics better than others. One of the common themes throughout the readings is that addicts display a range of personal and situational problems. There is no "typical" addicted personality or emotional problem (Allen, 1996). Because of these facts, it comes as no surprise that there are also no typical assessment or treatment for these individuals. For instance, a medical/disease model of alcoholism may be more useful to some alcoholics than others....   [tags: Papers] 1296 words
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The Disease of Alcoholism - The Disease of Alcoholism Alcoholism is a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. Alcoholism is a complex disease with physical, social and psychological consequences, but it can be treated through detoxification and anti-anxiety drugs. What will be explained in this essay is basically the history of alcohol, signs of one possibly being an alcoholic, possibilities to why one becomes an alcoholic, and treatments for it....   [tags: Papers] 1074 words
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Alcoholism-The Need for Improvement of Alcohol Treatment Programs - One out of every thirteen adults is affected by this. Fourteen million Americans alone suffer this disease, caused by a combination of physiological, psychological, social, and genetic factors. It destroys lives, tears apart families, and can even defeat the toughest of people. And now, nearly half of all teenage kids use it. I am speaking of course, of alcohol. Alcohol can only be defeated through proper funding, reform, and cooperation. There are approximately 85,000 alcohol related deaths in the United States each year (Drug War Facts, 2004)....   [tags: alcohol]
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Alcohol Dependence - Alcohol is the most commonly used and highly abused drug in the world. In the United States alone, 17.6 million people suffer from alcohol dependence, or better known as alcoholism. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease marked by a growing compulsion to drink and impaired control over drinking that eventually interfere with health and social behavior. It is an addiction that effects more people than just the alcoholic. Over 100,000 Americans die as a result of alcohol abuse. Results prove that alcohol played a role in half of the homicides, suicides and traffic deaths in the United States....   [tags: Addiction] 914 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease in which the drinking of alcohol becomes uncontrollable. Compulsion and craving of alcohol rules the life of the alcoholic. Many of us drink alcohol to socialize which is not alcoholism. An alcoholic is a frequent habitual user. Alcohol, a central nervous system depressant, dulls the senses especially vision and hearing. Signs of alcoholism are tremors, delirium, inability to concentrate and many others. “According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, more than 13 million Americans abuse alcohol”(Mayo Clinic Health Information 1)....   [tags: Alcoholism Diseases Alcohol Drinking Essays]
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Alcohol and Drinking - Women and Alcoholism - Women and Alcoholism        Alcoholism has been a fixture in our society since the first introduction of alcohol. Despite it being an equal opportunity disease, a large majority of not only the treatment, but also the research, has been about men. This lack of consideration of the different needs for men and women has led to many women going through recovery systems that do not address their experiences, and therefore do not allow them to take full advantage of that recovery system. This paper will attempt to look at the different experiences that men and women have in their journey through a substance addiction (particularly alcohol), from addiction through recovery....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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The Disease of Alcoholism - The Disease of Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholic’s inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems....   [tags: Alcoholism Drug Abuse Health Essays]
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True Road to Recovery - The True Road to Recovery For years, many new and innovative recovery options have sprouted up in response to the growing population of addicts in America. Although each individual program has the same ultimate goal, they each take a different approach. The specific approach taken by each program is what can make or break the success of recovery for an addict. The most popular of these programs are twelve-step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous. However, twelve-step programs are not the only options available....   [tags: Health] 975 words
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Alcohol and Drinking - Alcoholism as a Disease - Alcoholism as a Disease      Unfortunately, alcohol brings on the risk of many diseases. "Recent evidence indicates that a wide variety of diseased conditions are brought about by a substance that coats the body's red cells, causing them to adhere to one another in clumps. These clumps, sometimes called 'sludge,' can be created by the ingestion of alcohol"(Burgess,p.130). Alcohol has a disastrous affect on all of the body's organs, the main one being the brain. "At death, the brain of the dependent drinker or alcoholic invariably will reveal enormous numbers of small areas of atrophy in which brain cells have been destroyed"(Burgess,p.131)....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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The Effects of Alcoholism on Family and Children - The Effects of Alcoholism on Family and Children Society faces problems everyday, however individuals learn to deal with these problems and solve them in the best way they can. One of societies problems that has plagued human kind for generations and still is left unsolved is the problem of alcohol abuse or Alcoholism. Alcoholism has been called the most serious drug problem in terms of number of victims and cost to society. Why people get hooked and why they betray family values has baffled scientists for years....   [tags: Papers] 998 words
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Risk factors in the transmission of alcoholism from parent to child - Alcoholism is a major contributor to dysfunction in families today. Research has shown that children who are born to an alcoholic family are adversely affected by alcoholism in their development (Baker and Stephenson, 1995). Children of alcoholics possess a greater risk of acquiring alcoholism as a result of their parent¡¦s alcoholism (Reich, 1997). Within the body of this paper, this thesis will be supported. The text of this paper will list and describe risk factors in the transmission of alcoholism from parent to child, both specifically related to alcohol use and influences of a psychosocial nature....   [tags: Alcohol Addiction] 1842 words
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Symptoms, Causes, and Effects of Alcoholism - Symptoms, Causes, and Effects of Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease that affects many people in the United States today. It not only affects the alcoholic, but also their family, friends, co-workers, and eventually total strangers. The symptoms are many, as are the causes and the effects. Alcoholism is defined as a pattern of drinking in which harmful consequences result for the drinker, yet, they continue to drink. There are two types of drinkers. The first type, the casual or social drinker, drinks because they want to....   [tags: Papers] 796 words
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Alcoholism in America - Alcoholism in America Abstract Alcoholism today is viewed by some as a disease and by others as “willful misconduct”. Alcoholism is indeed a medical disease living in abnormalities in the brain. This disease not only affects the alcoholic, it also affects the people around the alcoholic. It directly affects the ones that love the alcoholic the most including spouses, children, and parents. There is treatment for this disease. The first step to recovering from this disease is admitting that there is a problem....   [tags: Alcoholism] 1498 words
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Alcoholism Should Not Be Viewed As A Disease - Most people have a confused idea of alcoholism as a disease that invades or attacks your good health. Use of such a strong word such as "disease" shapes the values and attitudes of society towards alcoholics. A major implication of the disease concept is that what is labeled a "disease" is held to be justifiable because it is involuntary. This is not so. Problem drinking is a habit in which the so-called "alcoholic" simply has decided that the benefits of drinking outweigh the liabilities; it is all a matter of personal choice....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Work Hard, Party Harder: Alcoholism and College Campuses - College. A great place to build a foundation for the future. A great place for independence, responsibility and maturity. Sure that’s all part of the whole college experience, but what really lurks on campus during the late nights. What happens on Fridays and Saturdays. Are students in their dorms anxiously for Monday to come. Well, all types and ranges of activities come about; from a good game of tennis at the tennis court, to lighting up that mary-jane at the parking lot. I know this may sound harsh, but how many college students you know spend their weekends in a library reading books, or thinking about what would be discussed in next weeks class....   [tags: college students, underage drinking, ] 789 words
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Alcoholism - Alcholism There are several different ways to describe substance abuse. So many people think that substance abuse only pertains to alcoholism. There is several other substances that may cause someone to be diagnosed with substance abuse disorder. Some of those things include: marijuana, alcohol, stimulants(cocaine and amphetamines), Hallucinogens, Inhalants, sedatives, and even nicotine. Even though some people may not see some of these things as things that may become addicting they are. More and more people are becoming addicted to the smallest things such as alcohol....   [tags: miscellaneous] 917 words
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The Dangers of Alcohol and Alcoholism - “For every family that is impacted by drugs, there are another 10 to 15 families impacted by alcohol abuse. It's a pretty big deal. We have a tendency to only look at part of the puzzle.” (Kevin Lewis). As a society we tend to categorize the severity of addiction in a way that drugs are the most dangerous and alcohol being just a problem. Because alcohol addiction can be a slow progressive disease many people don’t see it in the same light as drug addiction. An addiction to drugs is seen as being a more deadly and dangerous issue then that of alcohol because a drug addiction can happen more quickly and can kill more quickly....   [tags: addiction, term paper, research paper]
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Drinking Alcohol and Smoking Tobacco - A Deadly Duo - Alcohol and Tobacco: A Deadly Duo Cancer of the upper respiratory and alimentary tracts claimed over 23,000 lives in 1989 and 57,000 additional cases were diagnosed. The majority of individuals who fall prey to this type of cancer are males who abuse both alcohol and tobacco. The Risk The fact that the risk of developing cancer of the esophagus, lip, tongue, mouth, pharynx or larynx, increases dramatically in people who are heavy users of alcohol and tobacco is substantiated by 30 years of collective research....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 783 words
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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment - ... Withdrawal symptoms usually begin 12-48 hours after cessation of alcohol. Mild symptoms include tremor, weakness, sweating, hyperreflexia and GI symptoms. Some patients have generalized tonic-clonic seizures (Merck, 1999). Excessive, long term nutritional deficiencies must then be addressed during the detoxification and behavior modification process (Merck, 1999). The final approach that is discussed by Villanueva et al. (2007) is the motivational enhancement therapy (MET). MET is described as a client-centered style of motivation....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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Wernicke’s Encephalopathy - Wernicke’s Encephalopathy Introduction Carl Wernicke first described the syndrome in 1881. He referred to the disorder as acute superior hemorrhagic polioencephalitis. Some of the original patients he described included two male alcoholics and a women with esophageal stenosis. He described a clinic triad of encephalopathy, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Unfortunately, most diagnoses are not made clinically but rather at autopsy. This suggests that the classic clinical triad is rare, or that clinicians do not properly recognize the symptoms....   [tags: Biology Health Medicine Papers]
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Alcohol Dependence - Alcohol Use Disorders are disorders that are caused by the intake of alcohol over a period of time and in ways that lead to harms with health, personal relationships, school, or work. Different alcohol use disorders comprise alcohol dependence, alcohol abuse, alcohol intoxication, and alcohol withdrawal. A person with alcohol dependence has an increased tolerance to alcohol or symptoms of withdrawal after the stop of alcohol ingestion. People who are dependent on alcohol may spend considerable amounts of time drinking alcohol despite the fact that they are fully knowledgeable of the destructive characteristics of the drug....   [tags: essays research papers] 1134 words
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Alcohol Abuse - ... These laws are all taken very seriously and the consequences follow the individual throughout their life. For example, a person who is convicted of multiple DUI’s can lose their license for long periods of time, have to pay increased insurance bills and face the possibility of spending time in jail. The negative consequences of an alcoholic’s actions can possibly “take over” and ruin their lives. The effects of alcohol abuse on people goes further than just behavior because it affects the brain and other parts of the human body as well....   [tags: Health]
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Should Alcoholism Be Considered a Disease? - Should Alcoholism Be Considered a Disease. Many articles have been written which ask the question: Is alcoholism a disease or not. We will look at both sides of this issue, see what the experts have to say and come to realize that alcoholism should be considered a disease. In 1849, Swedish physician, Dr. Magnus Huss coined the term “alcoholism” to describe a diseased condition caused by excessive consumption of alcohol. Also in 1849, a French doctoral candidate, M.Gabriel, first used the term in its modern sense, as a disease which causes one to lose control over his/her intake of alcohol, leading to excessive use of alcohol, what we now call addiction ( Keller & Doria,1991)....   [tags: Alcohol ] 1276 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease in which a person has an overwhelming desire to drink alcoholic beverages. A person who has this desire is called an alcoholic because he/she feels forced to drink. Alcoholism is considered one of the most serious problems in the world. Alcohol creates many problems in our society and people's personal lives. A large number of people in the world die from different diseases caused by alcohol. According to the Maclean's magazine, " In 1993, 3,062 people died from diseases directly related to alcohol consumption such as cirrhosis....   [tags: Papers] 765 words
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Drinking Status, Labeling, and Social Rejection - Drinking Status, Labeling, and Social Rejection Drinking has been, for a long time, a very debatable topic. In the 1920s, drinking was seen as something so bad that it needed to be prohibited completely. Alcohol consumption is still often seen as distasteful, especially in large quantities. In this study by Keith M. Kilty and Thomas M. Meenaghan, researchers looked at the drinking status of fictional people along with other factors such as age and sex and asked participants to rate these people based on such attributes....   [tags: essays research papers] 1277 words
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alcohol abuse - Alcoholism is an overwhelming desire to drink alcohol, even though it is causing harm. Alcohol is a drug. In the United States alcoholism is the most widespread form of drug abuse, effecting at least 5 million people. About one third of high school students in the US are thought to be influenced drinkers. Many already may be alcoholics. A person who is dependent on alcohol is called an alcoholic. Drunk drivers account for one half of all fatal automobile accidents each year in the US. Alcoholism also creates many severe physical problems....   [tags: essays research papers] 894 words
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Definitions of and Treatment for Alcohol Abuse - One out of every thirteen adults are considered to be an alcoholic or to suffer from drinking problems. Alcoholism is a developmental disease that progresses slowly over a number of years and is based on both the physical and emotional dependency on alcohol. In many cases it leads to brain damage or early death. Alcoholism is a chromic disease, which means that it will last a person’s lifetime. The risk for developing alcoholism is influenced by both a person’s genes and their lifestyle. Early symptoms of alcoholism includes putting an excessive importance on the availability of alcohol....   [tags: Alcohol Abuse, alcohol, Alcoholism, ] 585 words
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Treatments Of Alcoholism - Treatments of Alcoholism Alcoholism can destroy the life of an alcoholic and devastate the alcoholic's family. But it also has overwhelming consequences for society. Consider these statistics from the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence: *In 1988, alcoholism and problems related to it cost the United States an estimated $85.8 billion in mortality and reduced productivity; *Fetal alcohol syndrome, caused by a woman's drinking during pregnancy, afflicts five thousand infants a year; it costs about $1.4 billion annually to treat the infants, children and adults afflicted with FAS; *More than twenty thousand people die annually in alcohol related car accidents....   [tags: essays research papers] 1829 words
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A Comparison of Two Types of Treatment for Alcoholism - A Comparison of Two Types of Treatment for Alcoholism One of the largest debates in the study of alcoholism is the etiology of the disorder. The prevailing theory today seems to be that alcoholism is a disease, a biological affliction that can only be ameliorated by abstinence or medication. However, there are those who believe alcoholism has its roots in environmental influences and that the disorder is a maladaptive pattern of behavior. The two main methods currently employed for treating alcoholism reflect the foundations of the two main theories....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Alcohol and the Family - Alcohol and the Family   In the United States alone, there are 28 million children of alcoholics - seven million of these children are under the age of eighteen.   Every day, these children experience the horrors of living with an alcoholic parent. 40%-50% of children of alcoholics grow up and become alcoholics themselves. Others develop eating disorders or become workaholics. Children of alcoholics receive mixed messages, inconsistency, upredictability, betrayal, and sometimes physical and sexual abuse from their parents....   [tags: Alcoholism Drinking Essays Research Papers]
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Alcoholism - My bookreport is about living with someone who drinks too much. I chose this topic because hit its very close to home. In the book that I read it tells about other children who are or have grown up with an alcoholic parent. I learned alot about acoholism which is what makes you an alcoholic. I also learned about what some kids go through while growing up. This book tells you how to deal with someone who is an alcoholic and how to deal with your self as well.This book was very interesting and I really enjoyed it....   [tags: essays research papers] 1081 words
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The Debate on Whether Alcoholism is a Disease or Not - The Debate on Whether Alcoholism is a Disease or Not Many specialists today are in a debate on whether alcoholism is a disease or not. I looked up the word disease in the new American Webster dictionary. It stated that a disease is a condition ill health, or malady. Malady is defined as any disordered state or condition. Alcoholism causes illness and disorder. Someone who is an alcoholic has a dependency on the drug alcohol. If you are dependent on alcohol, you can acquire many illnesses both physical and mental....   [tags: Alcoholism Health Alcohol Abuse Essays] 1427 words
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Alcohol Abuse: Alcoholism as a Disease - missing works cited The problem of alcohol abuse has been recognized for thousands of years, but only more recently have we begun to see alcohol addiction as a treatable disorder. According to the Classical Disease Model of `Alcoholism,' habitual use of alcohol can be identified as a disease. Webster's Dictionary defines the concept of `disease' as follows: "Any departure from health presenting marked symptoms; malady; illness; disorder." Therefore, as many occurrences of alcohol excess provoke such symptoms, it is somewhat understandable that `alcoholism' is classified as a disease....   [tags: Health Addiction] 2136 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcoholism addiction is a stigmatized disorder. The alcoholic is a sick person Suffering from a disease for which there is, no known cure in the sense that he or she will ever be able to drink moderately. I have learned that the alcoholic must learn to stay away from alcohol completely in order to lead a normal life. Fundamentally, alcoholism is a health problem, a physical and emotional disease rather that a question of too little willpower or of moral weakness. “The Son of man has come eating and drinking; and You say, ‘Behold a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of Tax collectors and sinners!” Luke 7:34 Alcoholism takes many routes and has an adaptive stage....   [tags: Papers] 766 words
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Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcohol Dependence is a disease characterized by: a strong need or compulsion to drink, the frequent inability to stop drinking once a person has begun, the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms (nausea, sweating, shakiness) when alcohol use is stopped after a period of heavy drinking, and the need for increasing amounts of alcohol in order to feel an affect. Most experts agree that alcoholism is a disease just as high blood pressure, diabetes and arthritis are diseases. Like these other diseases, alcoholism tends to run in the family....   [tags: Alcohol Addiction Dependence]
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"A Domestic Dilemma" - Ever since the Meadows family moved to New York from Alabama, something has been different. Martin would come home every night to the sight of his wife tippling around the house. Martin's wife, Emily had become an alcoholic. It was bad enough that Martin had to hire a house keeper to clean the house and look after their two children, Andy and Marianne. One night Emily had dropped Marianne on the corner of the table. It was not her intension, but she was just not coordinated enough to handle the child....   [tags: American Literature] 1373 words
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Neurobiological Mechanisms for Alcoholism - Neurobiological Mechanisms for Alcoholism While alcohol could well be considered the most socially acceptable psychoactive drug in our society, the dangers of alcohol abuse and addiction are well known. However, not everyone who uses, or even abuses, alcohol will actually become an alcoholic who is physically dependent on the drug. Not all of the mechanisms that cause one to become addicted to alcohol have been clarified. However, there seem to be two main reasons for alcohol addiction. One is that the chronic consumption of alcohol causes changes in the brain that result in a dependence on alcohol....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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alcohol - Alcoholism, chronic and usually progressive illness involving the excessive inappropriate ingestion of ethyl alcohol, whether in the form of familiar alcoholic beverages or as a constituent of other substances. Alcoholism is thought to arise from a combination of a wide range of physiological, psychological, social, and genetic factors. It is characterized by an emotional and often physical dependence on alcohol, and it frequently leads to brain damage or early death. Some 10 percent of the adult drinkers in the United States are considered alcoholics or at least they experience drinking problems to some degree....   [tags: essays research papers] 799 words
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Teenage Alcoholism - Teenage Alcoholism *Missing Works Cited* Teenagers today have no idea what alcoholism really is. They think that they can never become alcoholics. They think that it could never happen to them, but they are wrong. Stress, Family problems and the desire to be popular are wrong the cause of teenage alcoholism. Signs that a teenager has a drinking problem and steps that parents can take to help their child are what I will discuss in this paper. The critical ingredient common to all alcoholic beverages is ethyl alcohol or ethanol ( Lang 21)....   [tags: Papers] 1089 words
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Self Destructive Behavior and Role of the I function - Self Destructive Behavior and Role of the I function The I function describes all behavior associated with the notion of self. Is there really a specific I function and what is its role exactly. Because the I function is linked to the self, one would think that it would prevent harmful behaviors. However, there are cases where the I function does not intervene to terminate detrimental actions for example addiction and a mental disorder called Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. In both cases, a person is harming themselves and can not seem to stop....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Dangers of Alcoholism - Alcoholism Alcoholism is a very serious disease, which can cause illness, death, injuries, schooling problems, family breakups, and crime. It is a proven fact the alcohol kills more people than any other illegal drugs combined. However, alcohol courses freely through American society, from college bars to corporate lunches. In a recent journal article by The Scientist, it is stated, "Technology shows alcohol abuse changes brain's molecular programming and circuitry. (Scientist). Thus revealing that alcohol is a quick fix that will hurt us all in the long run....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
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Alcohol Abuse Among College Students and Possible Solutions - Alcohol Abuse Among College Students and Possible Solutions Binge or excessive drinking is the most serious problem affecting social life, health, and education on college campuses today. Binge or excessive drinking by college students has become a social phenomena in which college students do not acknowledge the health risks that are involved with their excessive drinking habits. Furthermore college students do not know enough about alcohol in general and what exactly it does to the body or they do not pay attention to the information given to them....   [tags: Binge Drinking Papers]
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Alcohol Advertisements Exploit Younger Crowds - Alcohol Advertisements Exploit Younger Crowds According to the 1998 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA), approximately 19 percent of teenagers 12 to 17 years old were reported to be engaged in alcohol abuse last year. As teenagers grow older, they tend to maintain a higher level of alcohol consumption. The survey reports that approximately 32 percent of young people aged 18 to 24 continue alcohol abuse. In fact, this is the most troubled age group having the highest rates of alcohol use, alcohol dependence, and need for treatment....   [tags: Drinking Alcoholic Ads Essays]
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Alcohol and Drinking - Treatments for Alcoholism - Treatments for Alcoholism         Where can alcoholics receive help. “Hospitals, psychiatric agencies, public-welfare departments, and social agencies, among others are often reluctant to provide care and treatment for problem drinkers” (Plaut, 53). Although it is difficult to help these problems drinkers, many people will give all they can to help these problem drinkers. “The provision of treatment to problem drinkers is complicated because they differ from one to another in so many ways” (Plaut, 33)....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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