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Your search returned over 400 essays for "A Description of New England"
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Contrasting William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation and John Smith's A Description of New England - Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford and A Description of New England by John Smith are essentially irrelevant to one another in the way that each piece has a very different point of view. The author John Smith was a pilgrim who arrived in the Americas and wrote a description of the new land. William Bradford was also a pilgrim who arrived at Plymouth and wrote more about the realities of his personal journey. The purpose of this essay is to contrast the purposes of the writers, their intended audiences, and how each writer gives out a specific feeling....   [tags: American history, compare/contrast] 546 words
(1.6 pages)
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Analysis of A Description of New England by John Smith - Analysis of A Description of New England by John Smith The author John Smith, a pilgrim who arrived to the Americas, wrote a description of the new land in his book “ A Description of New England ”. In this book Smith shows a wonderful world of vast food and pleasure. Also, William Bradford another pilgrim who arrived to Plymouth on the coast of Massachusetts, wrote a book called “ Of Plymouth Plantation ” in which he describes what really happened, how the pilgrims actually lived. The purpose of this essay is to compare and contrast both authors and their books....   [tags: John Smith American History Colonization Essays] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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Compare and Contrast A Description of New England and A Model of Christian Charity - Compare and Contrast A Description of New England and A Model of Christian Charity Mankind can be conceived in interesting ways by analyzing the writings of John Smith and John Winthrop.  As I read through John Smith‘s “A Description of New England” and John Winthrop’s “A Model of Christian Charity,” it became evident to me that the two readings had similar and different viewpoints of the essential nature of man.  Throughout my paper, I will compare their similar beliefs of community and diversity of people and completely contrast their ideas of emphasis on religion and relationships with enemies....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 744 words
(2.1 pages)
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Comparing John Smith’s A Description of New England and William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation - Comparing John Smith’s A Description of New England and William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation When the first American settlement on Roanoke Island was established in 1585 it’s primary force, Sir Walter Raleigh, had no idea that this “New World” would evolve into one of the most powerful voices in the modern world. But before it developed it would have to shaped by it’s founders from the Western world. Two of the largest voices in America’s early development are John Smith, who with a group of English merchants, hoped to get rich in this new land, and William Bradford, a puritan farmer who was one of the most influential men involved with the Mayflower compact....   [tags: American History Compare Contrast]
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972 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jamaica Kincaid's On Seeing England for the First Time - Imagine your culture being thrown aside and a new one was all that was taught to you. How would you react to it. In this story the author, Jamaica Kincaid, is talking about how she reacted to this and what happened to her. The author grows up in a place where England colonization had taken place. She grew up in Antigua, a small island in the Caribbean. She is taught all her life about England, a place she has never seen. At an early age she started to realize that the English had taken over her culture....   [tags: On Seeing England for the First Time] 832 words
(2.4 pages)
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Imagery and Exceptionalism in New England - Imagery and Exceptionalism in New England Jonas Clarke, the minister of the Congregational church in Lexington, Massachusetts, entertained guests at his home the evening of April 18, 1775. The two guests that Clarke hosted were seeking a safe haven from British authorities. His guests, Samuel Adams and John Hancock, discussed strategy with Clarke concerning the conflict with Britain as they attempted to keep their location secret from the British. Supposedly, Great Britain planned to capture these two radicals in hopes of terminating the colonial resistance....   [tags: American History Essays]
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How different was the Cromwell of the Protectorate from the Cromwell of the Civil Wars? - From the English Civil Wars to the end of Cromwell’s Protectorate in 1658, the character of Cromwell was influenced by a number of factors. It is through his early career, that the blend of intense Puritanism and a political demagoguery nature created the authoritative, bold and disciplined Cromwell that was present during the Protectorate years. It is understandable to see how the choices in his life and social events shaped his character into becoming the first and only proletariat to become Lord Protector over England....   [tags: England]
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2048 words
(5.9 pages)
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Captain John Smith - Captain John Smith After reading three short selections on Captain John Smith (General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles, A Description of New England, and New England’s Trials) in The Norton Anthology of American Literature, 6th Ed., a second source was helpful to learn more about this historical figure. Philip L. Barbour, in The Three Worlds of Captain John Smith, focuses on the major roles Captain Smith filled during his lifetime: adventurer, colonist, and promoter. Because the book was divided into three main categories, it was helpful to use this secondary source in order to gain a greater understanding of John Smith’s role in the New World....   [tags: Native Americans History New England Essays]
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England in 1819 - England in 1819 Great poetry is great not because of what it says but because of how it is phrased. Few poems say anything that is very profound; instead, the best of them use language in novel, memorable, and effective ways. Certainly this is true of Percy Bysshe Shelley's famous sonnet "England in 1819." In this poem Shelley describes the depressing, dark, and dirty state of affairs caused in Britain by political, social, and spiritual corruption. However, this poem would not be nearly as effective if it were not for Shelley's powerful use of such classic rhetorical devices as adjectives, alliteration, assonance, imagery, irony, lists, themes, and verbs....   [tags: essays papers] 1036 words
(3 pages)
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England: The City of Today - England: The City of Today Glorious, glorious England. As the Empire spreads some say "so does its glory"; others mumble of the price which we pay for our greatness. Many of us Londoners have read, if not discussed, the intriguing debate transpiring between Sir Andrew Ure and Sir James Phillips Kay. Are the cities of great England truly representative of the jewels in Her Majesty's Crown. Or are they the stain of exploitation and abuse that some have proclaimed. Sir James Phillips Kay, an M.D....   [tags: European Europe History] 2167 words
(6.2 pages)
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Bram Stoker's Dracula and the Fears of Victorian England - In periods of cultural insecurity, when there are fears of regression and degeneration, the longing for strict border controls around the definition of gender, as well as race, class, and nationality, becomes especially intense. If the different races can be kept in their places, if the various classes can be held in their proper districts of the city, and if men and women can be fixed in their separate spheres, many hope, apocalypse can be prevented and we can preserve a comforting sense of identity and permanence in the face of that relentless specter of millennial change....   [tags: Dracula Essays]
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Gypsies in Nineteenth-Century England - Gypsies in Nineteenth-Century England Missing Works Cited Despite the important role Gypsies played in the nineteenth-century, they were not automatically accepted as equals in society. In fact, from the moment they set foot on European soil, the Gyspies were misunderstood and even feared. These feelings became manifest in prejudices, which led to discriminatory actions. At the same time, however, Victorian society found itself fascinated with these strange Gypsies. The gypsy motif in Jane Eyre reflects the ambiguous attitude of Victorian society toward Gypsies....   [tags: European History Essays] 2034 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Best Description of the UK Party System - The Best Description of the UK Party System Two-party, Three-party, Multi-party or dominant-party A two-party system is a system that always has either one of two main parties in power, for example the republicans and the democrats in the US. The argument for the UK being a two-party system is quite strong. One of the main points is that either Labour or the Conservatives have been in power since 1945, not once since then has another party got into power. There is a compelling argument for why the UK should be considered a two-party system, one of the main points of this argument is that since 1945 either the Conservatives or the Labour party have been in power....   [tags: Papers] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
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Description and Analysis of Freemasonry Organization - One of the most controversial topics that seems interesting, and occurs now on Earth, is that people are being exploited and deceived. Earth is being assaulted and destructed day after day by one organization. The organization was created in 1717. They do not pray only for the father of Hebrew Scriptures, they worship the old gods of old mysteries. They believe that god was human and have created Jesus (Keohane, n.d). They were planning on achieving their goals. One of their goals is "to dominate the whole world by forming one government and to put the whole blame on the Jews in order that people will fall into the trap of following the Brotherhood" Moreover, they're aiming to take on or con...   [tags: freemasons, anti masonic, anti christ]
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1319 words
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The House of Tudor's Description - The House of Tudor was a group of well-known royalty, which later grew into something bigger. The House of Tudor lasted from 1485 to 1603, starting with Henry VII and ending with James I. Their established emblem was a rose and they considered themselves as the heirs to the throne. The way the emblem came about was very simple; it represented the joining of the Lancaster and Yorkist families. The Lancasters’ rose was white, the Yorkists’ rose was red, and the Tudor rose was red and white. The joining of the roses of the two families marked the end of the English civil war, the Wars of the Roses....   [tags: henry IV, westminister, tudor rose]
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Batlles, Medics, and Soldiers from the Revolutionary War - ... The war showed little remorse for those fighting. Another thing is the conditions of the battles that turn wins into losses. There are times that it is good to loose. “The engagement (known as the battle of Bunker Hill) ended in a British victory, but lent to encouragement to the Revolutionary cause. The British saw no other way but to fight the colonists. There were little supplies for the rebels but they did the best with what they had. The life of the soldier has many struggles in the war....   [tags: freedom, england, america] 763 words
(2.2 pages)
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Chivalry and Feudalism in The Lord of the Rings - “Out of the Great Sea to Middle-earth I am come. In this place will I abide, and my heirs, unto the ending of the world,” states Aragorn upon his victorious return to Minas Tirith (Tolkien 946). This moment marks the culmination of years of trial and toil for Aragorn as he strived to regain his kingship; yet, throughout his existence, he remained the epitome of the chivalric hero and maintained his kingly qualities in secrecy. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, the character of Aragorn is just one of many examples of chivalry Tolkien utilizes to create his “mythology for England.” Tolkien also does not just limit himself to this one example of medievalism in his novels....   [tags: Character Analysis, Medieval England]
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2209 words
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New World Travelers: Similar Themes But Different Purposes In Travel Writing - Travel writers or adventurers all write pieces that deal with the same premise: the discovery and experience of the New World. However, in their writing, it is evident that there is an ulterior motive in mind. These motives or purposes can be classified in two broad categories: to persuade people to come to the new world and to warn people of the dangers they may encounter in the new world. It is easy to explore these themes by paying particular attention a couple of notorious writers: Christopher Columbus, Bartolome De Las Casas, and John Smith....   [tags: Comparative Analysis, Christopher Columbus] 1410 words
(4 pages)
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Analysis and Description of The Hundred Years War - The Hundred Years War didn’t last exactly a hundred years. It actually lasted for 116 years. All the battles were fought in France (Alchin). The war consisted of two countries to start, France and England, but was later joined by Burgundy (Alchin). Despite England winning most of the battles, the French wouldn’t give up and were victorious. According to ehistory.com, the 100 Years War was a series of chevauchees, sieges and naval battles interspersed with truces and uneasy peace. In 911, Carlolingian Charles the Simple allowed the Viking Rollo to settle in a part of his kingdom....   [tags: the anarchy, joan of arc, french war]
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Description of Harvard Model United Nations - Harvard Model United Nations is a four days conference and international stimulation for students who have interests in politics. This conference is annually held in Boston, Massachusetts by Harvard University students. HUMUN have brought more than 3000 students and faculties from schools, colleges, and universities around the world in one place to discuss issues that international community is facing today. Students have been preparing for long time for this conference to come and participate, debate, negotiate, and come up with resolutions to solve world’s most complex issues ranging from international peace and security to human rights....   [tags: united nations, human rights, humun]
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998 words
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Old Street Breweing Co. Description - Ultimately, my dream in life is to start a hard cider brewery in the state of Washington. I believe hard cider is going to be the next vastly popular alcoholic beverage in the United States. This dream came to me when I was studying in London, England. Hard cider is a very popular beverage in the United Kingdom, and I fell in love with it. The great state of Washington grows over 60% of the apples for consumption within the United States. We live in the American Garden of Eden, as I like to put it....   [tags: alcoholic beverage, hard cider, apples]
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New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies - By 1700, differences in religious convictions, wealth, and climate transformed the New England and Chesapeake Bay colonies into distinct societies with markedly contrasting cultures and values. Having fled England because of religious persecution, the Puritans placed a greater emphasis on religion. In contrast, the Chesapeake society, consisting mostly of men who were affected by the primogeniture laws, placed more importance on wealth and land. The climates of the two societies fostered distinct economies and new cultural practices, such as the tobacco wives in the Chesapeake region....   [tags: chesapeake society, new england, puritans] 670 words
(1.9 pages)
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Brave New World - Aldous Huxley proposes the dangers of government control in the future that combines with an obsession with technology to completely control society in his novel Brave New World. Huxley tells a story about a future society living in London, England where pleasure and technological progress take priority and Henry Ford is honored as a god. The novel is written in a detached but omniscient voice that reveals the subconscious of its characters and contributes to the theme of the novel. The benevolent totalitarian state rules over its genetically engineered population by providing pleasure and conditioning the masses....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Applying the Kotter Eight Step Change Model to New England Wire and Cable - Companies are not unlike species, they must both change with the current environment or risk becoming extinct. Charles Darwin succinctly states this idea, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent but the one most responsive to change.”1 In the case study, “Other People’s Money,” in the scene presented there is a proxy vote going to take place by the shareholders of the New England Wire and Cable (NWC) Company. But, before the votes are casted both the Chairman of the Board and patriarch Andrew "Jorgy" Jorgenson and the potential majority shareholder Lawrence "Larry the Liquidator" Garfield are afforded the opportunity to deliver speeches to the body of...   [tags: New England Wire and Cable]
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Building the New European Order - Building the New European Order When World War II ended the final remnants of the old European order lay in ruins. With such devastation wrought upon the continent twice in less than fifty years, it was remarkable that Europe managed to recover. What is even more remarkable is the Phoenix that rose from these ashes, and the new feelings of unity that accompanied the ending of the war. Those nations of western Europe began to do what decades ago had been unthinkable: develop the blueprints for a common system of the United Europe....   [tags: European History Essays] 1871 words
(5.3 pages)
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Use of Allegories in A New England Nun - Use of Allegories in A New England Nun    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife.          This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary....   [tags: New England Nun Essays] 1725 words
(4.9 pages)
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A Brief Description of the Colonies that Would Eventually Make up the United States - Colonial Life Virginia resembled a colony of small farms and great plantations, its fields filled with slaves. For the sole purpose of religious freedom, John Carver, William Bradford and John Winthrop founded Massachusetts. Colonial Massachusetts would be considered a Puritan society. Most were subsistence farmers, and provided for themselves. People who believed in Puritanism practiced strict, family-tied traditions. Religion played an important role in Puritan life. They felt that they were chosen by God for a special purpose and that they must live every moment in a God-fearing manner....   [tags: history of America] 1656 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Influence of War in Shaping the US - As we are all aware that America was not shaped over night, there were – in fact – certain instances in history that radically determined the shape of our great country. Many things will certainly come to mind, if you simply think about it long enough. The Revolutionary War, may pop into your minds first. Next may come the Civil War. Perhaps the Constitution, or the Founding Fathers. While all of these were detrimental to the formation of America, there is yet another part of history that influenced our country today....   [tags: History, Description, 1812] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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New Jersey- A History by Thomas Flemming - New Jersey- A History by Thomas Flemming New Jersey-A History, by Thomas Flemming, provides a clear and unbiased historical account from the early stages of this colony far into its birth as a state separate from imperialistic England. Although his historical account tends to be incomplete at times and a few misconceptions are evident, he touches on the many important points in New Jersey history, pointing out that, by observing how this state has dealt with her divisions is instructive, "for it demonstrates on a small scale how Americans have dealt with alarming social conflicts."1 Fleming begins his historical account of New Jersey when the English first began their involvement, yet th...   [tags: Papers] 2258 words
(6.5 pages)
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A Fever in Salem: A New Interpretation of the New England Witch Trials - The author of this book has proposed an intriguing hypothesis regarding the seventeenth-century witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts. Laurie Winn Carlson argues that accusations of witchcraft were linked to an epidemic of encephalitis and that it was a specific form of this disease, encephalitis lethargica, that accounts for the symptoms suffered by the afflicted, those who accused their neighbors of bewitching them. Though this interpretation of the Salem episode is fascinating, the book itself is extremely problematic, fraught with historical errors, inconsistencies, contradictions, conjecture, and a very selective use of the evidence....   [tags: New England Witch Trials] 685 words
(2 pages)
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Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Opening Doors for Women Limited opportunities for women to share their opinions publicly throughout the Nineteenth century caused an abundance of females to communicate their ideas through writing. Catharine Maria Sedgwick was among the first of American authors to publish historical and other fiction. Much of her work deals with the role of white women in society, especially involving the Cult of Domesticity or True Womanhood....   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
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Irish Female Emigration: The Views of Akenson and Lambert - ... Lambert, though she agrees that this accounts for some women, asserts that other women stayed connected to their families and even taught their children about Irish traditions and culture. She contends that Irish women closely associated with their Irish families and placed great value on this structure. Moreover, Lambert claims that most women emigrated for economic independence or for being a financial burden on their families, but only two women cited that they moved to “distance themselves from what they perceived to be excessive parental control” (182)....   [tags: Britain, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, USA]
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Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale - Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale In her article “‘But is it any good?’: Evaluating Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction,” Susan Harris provides methods and criteria for examining Women’s Fiction in what she calls “process analysis” (45). To apply Harris’ guidelines to Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale, I must first “acknowledge the ideological basis of [my] endeavor” (45) as a feminist/equalitist critique of the text. Furthermore, I identify the three-fold approach that Harris describes as historical, in distinguishing early nineteenth-century from mid- to late-century attitudes, rhetorical, in labeling Sedgwick’s communicat...   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
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Influence of the Puritan Faith on the Development of New England - ... Puritan followers strived to comprehend the ways God. This belief also caused the Puritans to think themselves better by destiny; as stated by William Bradford, following the Pequot War, “…and they gave the praise thereof to God…who had wrought so wonderfully a [victory]” (Doc D). Some Puritans viewed the American Indian religion as blasphemous and thus viewed them as inferior. The faith in religion and church drove them to educate their children in a similar fashion. The New England colonies contained the nest educational system compared to the other colonies; the system was based on religion alongside reading and writing....   [tags: New World colonies] 755 words
(2.2 pages)
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Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun - Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun It is hard to imagine a life in American society without first picturing marriage in a church, white picket fences, and babies. Life alone for those who turn from marriage and children can be seen as a promise of loneliness. Yet choosing not to get married or to have children does not mean unhappiness. In the words of Anne Morrow Lindbergh: “There is a quality to being alone that is incredibly precious. Life rushes back into the void, richer, more vivid, fuller than before” (qtd....   [tags: Mary wilkins freeman New England Nun Essays] 1478 words
(4.2 pages)
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Personal Narrative: Identity - Personal Narrative: Identity Identity-“Ones personal qualities.”Identiy is something only he or she can fully define. My uncle says I am affectionate,cheerful, and calm. My grandmother sees me as slim, pretty and sweet. My dad described me as perky, cheerful and happy, my mom says beautiful, gentle, and self-conscious. These adjectives describe me accurately, yet they are only abstract versions of me. Adjectives cannot begin to describe me and I aknowlege these descriptions for what they are, a condensed translation from my outward self to the world....   [tags: Papers Personal Description Essays] 1339 words
(3.8 pages)
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Racial Tensions in New England - Historical fiction, generally, exposes readers to a historic event through a new lens—often from a first-person perspective. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, by M.T. Anderson, does a remarkable job illustrating a unique, though fictional, perspective of the revolution in New England through the eyes of an experiment: Octavian Nothing. While written with an adolescent audience in mind, Octavian Nothing offers great insight to the transitional period between racial attitudes in American society for all readers....   [tags: Racism]
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Challenging Gender Roles in English Society - Challenging Gender Roles in English Society The age of Shakespeare was characterized by an overwhelming tendency for women to be looked down upon as the inferior gender. Women of the time were expected to be submissive, dutiful, obedient, and predominantly silent. The idea of an independent, out-spoken woman would have challenged all of the societal values of the time. Shakespeare, however, challenged the traditional patriarchal values of his time by introducing powerful and highly influential female characters in some of his most memorable plays....   [tags: England Literature Papers] 2702 words
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Differences in the Development of New England and the Chesapeake Region - Differences in the Development of New England and the Chesapeake Region Question: Although New England and the Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. Why did this difference in development occur. By the 1700s the two regions, New England and Chesapeake varied greatly in spite of being from the same mother country, England. Physical and cultural differences separated these two regions distinctively. While religion moulded the daily life in New England, Money and tobacco farming dominated the Chesapeake....   [tags: English History England Settlement Essays] 797 words
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CASE: Paul Cronan and New England Telephone Company (A) - CASE: Paul Cronan and New England Telephone Company (A) I.     LEGAL CASE ANALYSIS A.     Facts Paul Cronan was hired by New England Telephone (NET) in 1973 as a file clerk. In 1983 he was promoted to service technician. He worked in Needham, Massachusetts for 18 months before transferring to South Boston, Massachusetts. In 1985, Cronan suffered from medical symptoms due to AIDS-related complex (ARC), and missed work sporadically for 6 months. In June, 1985 Cronan requested a third leave of absence from work for a doctor’s appointment....   [tags: Legal Legality Case England Essays] 2446 words
(7 pages)
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Industrialization in England - The world has changed in many ways throughout history. Industrialization has changed England in many ways. The Industrial Revolution was too hard on the men, women, and children in England. The changes that occurred in the economy and society in Britain during the late 18th and 19th century is known as the Industrial Revolution (McCloskey Int.). The Industrial Revolution was a drawn-out process that transformed Britain’s economy from the production of goods by hand to the production of goods by machine (Thackerary 1)....   [tags: England]
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DBQ on Differences Between New England and Chesapeake Area - Two unique societies were constructed by people of common origin. These English colonists immigrated to the New World for either economic prosperity or religious freedom. During colonization, two regions were formed, New England and the Chesapeake Bay area. The two contrasting societies of New England and Chesapeake region were the results of diversity of: social and family structure; health and living conditions; economy; religion and beliefs; and government policies. As stated in Document A, unity was encouraged among New Englanders, which developed into close societies....   [tags: English Colonists in the New World] 750 words
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New England and Chesapeake Colonization - During the 1600’s the New England and Chesapeake regions were beginning to settle and colonize. While both came from English origin and had dreams of wealth and freedom, differences began to form just as they settled and by the 1700s the two regions will have evolved into two distinct societies. Because of the exposure to different circumstances both regions developed issues that were unique from one another and caused them to construct their societies differently. Therefore, the differences socially, politically and economically in the two regions caused the divergence....   [tags: Differences, Challenges, Independence] 732 words
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Making The New England Aquarium Accessible To Minority Communities - The New England Aquarium had a difficult dilemma. The organization wanted to become an entity representative of the city of Boston and characterize its ethnic, racial, and economic diversity. However, since the late 1960's, the aquarium was considered inaccessible by minority communities. As such, its board of trustees wanted to change this image. In the early 1990's, they developed a plan to "attract and involve" populations previously underrepresented. At the same time, the education department began to implement programs targeting minority youth....   [tags: Business Management] 1541 words
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Industrial Revolution in England and Working Conditions - The industrial revolution began in England during the late 1700’s and early 1800’s. There were several factors that played a role in why the industrial revolution began in England. One of the most important factors that played a role was the rich land. The land at this point in time had numerous different natural resources that could be used to benefit the country. The land had an enormous amount of different resources such as coal, iron, wool, cotton, and lead. Another major benefit of the geography of the land was how the furthest point in the country from sea was only seventy miles away....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, England, history, ]
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491 words
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The Chesapeake Colonies and New England Colonies - In 1419, Prince Henry the Navigator of Portugal began the period of time known as the “Age of Exploration”. Europe’s leading superpowers, France, Spain, Portugal, Holland, and England, all competed for colonization in unknown territories. Samuel de Champlain colonized along the St. Lawrence River in 1608, Henry Hudson of Holland established Albany in 1609, and Spain established colonies in Mexico and Mesoamerica. In 1607, England established its first colony in North America around the Chesapeake Bay, and nearly a decade later established a second colony in present-day New England....   [tags: Colonial America, Differences] 1270 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Accusation of Witches in Puritan, New England - The American weakness in times of trouble is the instinctive act of finding a scapegoat. Stemming from the Calvinistic religious beliefs of the Puritans who immigrated to America, anything that strays from the predestined lives of these puritanical people is the result of sin. The ideas of "original sin" and "predestination" are at the heart of Calvinism. Thus, the Calvinist Puritans have their lives planned out for them by God before birth and anything that disrupts that plan must be eradicated....   [tags: Salem Witch Trials, Witch Hunt] 1622 words
(4.6 pages)
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Description of Saint Paul's Cathedral in England - I have had many experiences that changed my outlook towards life. One of them was when I went to London, England. It was called St. Paul’s Cathedral. I had never been to a “cathedral” before, and I didn’t especially care to go and look at one. But my coach made me, and when we got there I heard a voice in my head yelling, “You’re going to hate this!” Regardless I was there and without chance to leave, so I figured I might as well try to appreciate it. Boy, am I glad I did because as I stood at the bottom of the enormous concrete steps towards the doors of St....   [tags: cathedral, london, st. paul's] 769 words
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Catherine Sedgwick's A New England Tale - Catherine Sedgwick’s A New England Tale is the story of Jane a young woman who is cast into a family where she is looked down upon, but through her trial and tribulations remains strong in her faith in God. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God focuses on those who lose faith and overlook the power of God’s hand, and by doing so will be sent to hell to repent their sins. Throughout the novel by Sedgwick and the sermon by Edwards it is the importance of moving forwards in life while staying faithful and true to God without sin remains the focus of the pieces....   [tags: God, Sinners, Analysis] 826 words
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Catherine Sedgwick's A New England Tale - Catherine Sedgwick’s A New England Tale is the story of Jane a young woman who is cast into a family where she is looked down upon, but through her trial and tribulations remains strong in her faith in God. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God focuses on those who lose faith and overlook the power of God’s hand, and by doing so will be sent to hell to repent their sins. Throughout the novel by Sedgwick and the sermon by Edwards it is the importance of moving forwards in life while staying faithful and true to God without sin remains the focus of the pieces....   [tags: Sin, God, Novel Analysis] 986 words
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Child-rearing in Puritan New England - 1. Using the primary sources in chapter 2, child-rearing in Puritan New England was described as the responsibility of Puritan parents. By introducing their children to the importance of education, Puritan parents agreed that child-rearing is a methods that will help ensure their children’s spiritual welfare (Hollitz, 22). The two main goals Puritans taught their children are reading and writing. It is a system they believed that will properly mold their offspring. Parents also taught basic beliefs of religion and principles of government to their children (Hollitz, 22)....   [tags: Child Care, Child Development, Social Issues] 1502 words
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Helen Keller's Amazing Description of New York City - ... It is possible that people may have told her about the beauty of the city, which is why she felt the need to experience city first handily. New York City definitely has a way of attracted all kinds of people, weather, old, young, blind, seeing and etc because of all of liveliness and the amount of exposure one could get there. One of Keller’s experiences that she will never forget is the boat trip. The trip took all day and circumvented New York (Keller, Helen 506). Her teacher, sister, niece accompanied Keller, and Mr....   [tags: blind, deaf, open-minded]
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Henry VII of England - Henry VII of England Introduction Henry VII is also known as Henry Tudor. He was the first Tudor king after defeating Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485. This battle saw the end of the Wars of the Roses, however to bring England to a powerful and also peace country he would have to sustain a full control of England. Henry VII was king of England from 1485 to 1509. His second son, also called Henry, inherited the throne and became Henry VIII. How did he keep the nobles under control....   [tags: History of England] 670 words
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Calvinism: A Look Into Domestic Life in Catherine Sedgwick's Novel, A New England Tale - Catharine Sedgwick’s novel, A New-England Tale, tells the story of an orphan, Jane Elton, who “fights to preserve her honesty and her dignity in a household where religion is much talked about but little practiced” (Back Cover). The story take place in the 1820s, a time when many children were suffering in silence due to the fact that there was really no way to get people to understand exactly how bad things were for them. The only way anyone could ever really get a true understanding of the lives of the children in these households would be by knowing what took place in their homes....   [tags: orphan, religion, reverence]
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King Henry VIII and his Great Impact on the History of England - King Henry VIII was one of the most powerful rulers in the fifteenth century, who had a very captivating life many people are not aware of. Most people know Henry VIII as a berserk king with too many wives, but there is more to Henry VIII than that. Many few people know about his life and what he truly contributed to our world. Henry VIII was an almighty leader in England who won’t soon be forgotten. Henry VIII was born in Greenwich, England on June 28, 1491. At the age of just two years old Henry was named Constable of Dover Castle, and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports....   [tags: european history, england] 2162 words
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National Identity in Julian Barnes' England, England - National Identity in Julian Barnes' England, England “The finest tax-deductible minds were brought in to address the Project’s Co-ordinating Committee. The French intellectual was a slight, neat figure in an English tweed jacket half a size too big for him; with it he wore a pale blue button-down shirt of American cotton, an Italian tie of flamboyant restraint, international charcoal wool trousers, and a pair of tasselled French loafers” (54). Julian Barnes uses his postimperial novel, England, England, to critique what England, under Tony Blair’s administration, is moving towards – a recreated Britain, an all-inclusive nation with no appreciation of its history, except that which has been...   [tags: Julian Barnes England Nationalism Essays] 1109 words
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The Trip To The New England Colonies - My trip started off with the 30 day voyage across the mighty Atlantic. Not knowing that I would be sent to the well established colony of Jamestown. I would be staying with the average family. They are to let me stay on account of rent from my publisher in England. My renter, a well developed man. He runs a silversmith shop. He is also an artist. I am sure he will show me pieces of his work. His wife, a very friendly lady from the reports. She is half Indian. They have 2 sons. Both well built and are very courteous....   [tags: essays research papers] 861 words
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Comparing and Contrasting the New England and Southern Settlements - The New England and the Southern colonial settlements were united in several areas that created the opportunity for each group of colonies to grow. However, these groups of colonies took divergent paths when it came to the founders’ motives to settle the New World, the importance of religious and social orientation, economic approaches and political developments. These different approaches were ultimately successful beyond the early founders’ expectations. Both the New England and Southern colonies enjoyed some common conditions that enabled them to grow....   [tags: religion, politics, motivation] 547 words
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High School Band Trip to England - It was a cold and windy day on March 16th, 2008. This was day we got off a plane from an eight-hour, leg cramping fight to London, England. Yet even now the dreary weather and long flight could not bring us down. The Chestermere High School concert band was so thrilled just to be there that nothing so minor as the weather really mattered.  Our group stayed in London for most of the time but we also went to Stratford Upon Avon and Harrogate where we stayed in Queen Ethelburga’s boarding school.      As there was one other school from Calgary slowing our progress through customs, we grew inpatient to manage our way through the labyrinthine maze of velvet ropes and guards, get our luggage and...   [tags: England, travel,] 824 words
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Chesapeake And New England Colonies - A community is a group of people who work together towards a common goal and share a common interest. Lack of such a quality can and most likely will cause a struggling town or city to fall into the extremes of poverty and wealth. The New England community was so strong and so supportive in comparison to that of the Chesapeake Bay, that it is no wonder they developed into two distinctly different cultures before the year 1700. The Chesapeake region developed into a land of plantations and money-driven owners, with the elite wealthy, almost no middle class, and those in poverty creating the population....   [tags: US History Colonies Compare Contrast] 1815 words
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Stone Walls Of New England - Introduction Stonewalls of New England are rich with history and archeologists are still trying to determine who may have built the first stonewalls or if our concept of when North America was first settled is wrong. Items of stone and metal lead archeologists to believe that the archaic period is when the Northern New England portion of America was first inhabited. There have been many different types of fences built in New England, natural debris, wood, and stone included. Stemming from these different fence types American ingenuity flourished and inventions arose....   [tags: essays research papers] 2631 words
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Differences Between the Early Settlements of New England and the South - The early colonies of America were all settled with the thoughts of a better life, but different settlers had varying aspirations which led to the first colonies having notable differences amongst them. The northern settlements of New England were more heavily influenced with the idea of freedom from The Church of England while the immigrants who settled in the south were more monetarily influenced. Both settlements desired to come to America for a sense of freedom, whether it be from the church or to tap new resources and establish a proprietary gain....   [tags: American History] 797 words
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The Chesapeak and the New England Area Become One - ... They did not invest largely in staple plantings, rather than, relied on artisan-industries like carpentry, shipbuilding, and publishing. The Chesapeake and New England attracted distinct kinds of settlers and, by 1700, the community’s differed tremendously. In New England, the community was nearly solely English and white. Devoutly devout families, encompassing Puritans, Quakers, and Catholics made up a large percentage of the community. In the Chesapeake, however, the community was a majority black-slaves with the boom in the tobacco commerce plantation proprietors relied on the labor slaves provided....   [tags: colonies, anglican, society] 595 words
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Settlers and Differences in the New England and Chesapeake Region of the US - DBQ Second Draft In the early 17th Century, great quantities of people emigrated from Great Britain to begin their individual lives again in the New World. These people, once in the New World, trans-located across the eastern side of the United State, and by the 18th century, despite their English ties had formed into two distinctly large communities mainly the New England and Chesapeake regions. Although the New England and Chesapeake regions were both greatly inhabited by people of English origin, the two groups varied in their political views, geographic locations and social beliefs; but, most importantly, the two regions varied in their religious emphasis and economic motives, which sig...   [tags: Puritans, Pilgrims, Religion] 691 words
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Native Peoples in New England - Native American history spans tens of thousands of thousands of years and two continents. It is a multifaceted story of dynamic cultures that in turn spawned intricate economic relationships and complex political alliances. Through it all, the relationship of First Peoples to the land has remained a central theme. Though Native Americans of the region today known as New England share similar languages and cultures, known as Eastern Algonquian, they are not one political or social group. Rather, they comprised and still comprise many sub-groups....   [tags: essays research papers] 1589 words
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The Unjust System of New England Puritan Court System - ... (S G) I doe not hurt them. I scorn it. (H) Who doe you imploy then to doe it. (S G) No creature but I am falsely accused” (Linder umck.edu). This shows a trait in Hawthorne's prosecution style where he always started his examination with assume guilt, as opposed to innocence. He also seemed to be on the accuser’s side (Salem Witch Trials 1). In Puritan New England, judicial and normal practices were centered around religion. Laws were extreme and often would relate to religion. Many examples of this are present in the Massachusetts Body of Liberties which was a set of laws that governed New England....   [tags: religion, punishment, cruel] 1004 words
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Irish Population in New England - There are more Irish people in New England than there is in Ireland. Irish people didn't just appear one day in the United States, though. Most of them emigrated here from Ireland over 55 years ago. Four in five people you meet in New England are at least one-eighth part Irish. It is easy to tell that when the Irish people came here, they didn't come in small groups. Ireland is a beautiful country in Europe, about the size of Maine. Today, Ireland is mostly populated with middle-class families....   [tags: American Culture] 987 words
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England and Spain´s Strategies to Conquer the New Land - ... When two bullet bags and their contents went missing, the settlers calmly came to the natives and they peacefully worked everything out. The stolen items were returned without and struggle. “Captaine Newport gaue thanckes to the Kinges and rewarded the theeves with the same toyes they had stollen.” (Source 3) This incident shows the depth of the respect natives had for settlers and vice versa. All of these events add up together to make a general sense of peace and respect between the natives and the settlers....   [tags: naties, persecution, economically, power] 822 words
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New England Vs Chesapeake - New England Vs Chesapeake Early English colonies in America hardly resembled the union of men and women that would later fight against England and build a new country. In fact, until the mid-eighteenth century, most English colonists had very little, if anything to do with the settlers in neighboring colonies. They heard news of Indian wars and other noteworthy events, not from the colony itself, but from England. The colonies in the New World appeared completely different and the prospect of any unity between them seemed impossible....   [tags: essays papers] 1012 words
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Smallpox in New England - Smallpox in New England The original New England Natives first felt the effects of Smallpox and other diseases during the first decade of the sixteenth century. This was shortly after John Cabot explored the coast in 1498. By 1504, constant fishing trips were being made by the French and Portuguese, which started the spread of disease. However, It wasn’t until the outbreak of 1616 and 1617, when huge numbers of natives were killed. Diseases like chicken Pox, cholera, the plague, tuberculosis, and many others were introduced to New England for the first time....   [tags: Colonial Diseases Native Americans Essays] 448 words
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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World - ... It’s this disposition to so bluntly live life without meaning, however, that makes her role in the novel so important. Lenina, in a sense, is the rest of society. Throughout the novel, Lenina’s character remains constant; therefore, she has not changed in from any two points of the story. Lenina, however, desperately struggles to win over John the Savage. Lenina’s strength and weakness in the novel is her conformity. 4. Helmholtz Helmholtz Watson is a socially superior Alpha-plus lecturer at the College of Emotional Engineering....   [tags: character description, analysis]
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Puritans in New England - Puritans in New England Raised during the aftermath of the fall of the Spanish Armada to England, the Puritan generation they were children and grandchildren of the Protestant Reformation in Europe. An idealistic generation of the Colonial Cycle, the Puritans came to America seeking freedom, to practice religion in a manner different than that of the English. Puritans regarded New England as a place to establish a "visible" kingdom of God, a society where outward conduct would be according to God's laws....   [tags: Papers] 462 words
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New England Patriarca Mafia - Organized crime in the United States keeps the FBI and other law enforcement agencies in a never-ending investigation of criminals suspected of the infiltration of legitimate businesses. A notorious twentieth century organized group was the New England Patriarca Mafia, or N.E.P.M.. Originating in 1915, the N.E.P.M. evolved over the early twentieth century decades, until 1954 when Raymond Loredo Salvatore Patriarca was donned as boss* and promptly began to expand its power. Due to mafia-related language that will be present throughout the paper, a page of definitions is supplied at the end of the paper....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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A New England Nun - Mary Wilkins Freeman was born, raised and spent the majority of her life in Puritan rural New England. This scene had a huge impact on her writing. Most of her novels and short stories had the ability to depict that lifestyle perfectly. One of the best examples of this is her story “A New England Nun.” (Fiction) The main characters in this story are Louisa Ellis and Joe Dagget. Other important characters are Caesar, the dog, and Lily Dyer. Louisa is described as very dainty, precise, and methodical....   [tags: Mary Wilkins Freeman] 943 words
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Conduct Unbecoming by Barry England - Conduct Unbecoming by Barry England Conduct Unbecoming revolves around two important yet very different characters; Drake and Millington. They are both new to the army but have very different views of the regiment. When they first enter ‘the mess’ Drake looks about ‘as a man finally at peace’ Whereas Millington looks with gloom. Drake starts ‘Exactly as I imagined it would be’ whereas Millington launches straight into sarcasm with ‘how very uplifting for you.’ He makes a point that the place ‘haunted his childhood’, showing us that not only does he hate it but he has also been there before....   [tags: Conduct Unbecoming Military England Essays] 685 words
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Mary Tudor of England - Mary Tudor or Queen Mary I of England was infamously known as Bloody Mary. While many believe Bloody Mary was an evil monster, others believe she was a great queen because of her many accomplishments. Mary was actually a good devoted Catholic others still to this day believe she was an evil woman, but with these interesting facts it will be determined that Mary was a good queen. Mary Tudor of England, Born on February 18, 1516, was always a precious lady.(Gairdner) According to the article “Queen Mary”: “Mary wanted to restore the catholic faith, and reunite England with Rome.” Queen Mary I was quite successful, she managed to rearrange “the royal household, and it was thought right to give...   [tags: Queen Mary of England]
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A Description of Catalytic Converters - Introduction: General Description A catalytic converter is an exhaust component used in modern automobiles to decrease the emission of toxic gasses. The average catalytic converter is capable of converting around 98% of these harmful emissions into relatively benign byproducts (UC Davis). It does this through the use of a catalyzing agent, that when combined with heat and oxygen produces a chemical reaction that is capable of converting various gasses such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydra carbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) into less harmful carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and water (H2O) (Wiki)....   [tags: Descriptive Essays, Informative Essay]
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New Labour's Academies Programme - ... Hatcher’s summary of what Labour’s policy on Academies intended to achieve contradicts Curtis (2009) observations that point to ‘little evidence on Academies ability to raise attainment’ and the notion that Academies were only introduced as an intervention process to change and transform education in disadvantaged communities and ‘turn around’ failing schools. Hatcher expands on this point about ‘external organisation’ as they continually change and drive the motives for business pressures and privatisation....   [tags: England's schools and education] 568 words
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New England Colonies - New England Colonies Motivation • By and large, the people who settled in the New England Colonies wanted to keep their family unit together and practice their own religion. • They were used to doing many things themselves and not depending on other people for much. • Some of these people came to New England to make money, but they were not the majority. Economy • The New England Colonies were largely farming and fishing communities. • The people made their own clothes and shoes. • They grew much of their own food....   [tags: American History] 1043 words
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How the New England Colonists Altered the New England Environment - How the New England Colonists Altered the New England Environment In Changes in the Land, William Cronon points out the European colonists` pursuits of a capitalistic market and the impact it had on the New England ecosystem. Native Americans and colonists had different views on the use of land resources. The Natives viewed the land as something not owned, but as a resource to sustain life. They believe in a hunting-gathering system, hunting only when necessary. In the long run Native Americans lost their old traditions and were forced to adapt to the colonists` traditions in order to survive....   [tags: Papers] 999 words
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