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Satire In Huckleberry Finn Essay

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According to Ernest Hemingway, "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn." Along with Hemingway, many others believe that Huckleberry Finn is a great book, but few take the time to notice the abundant satire that Twain has interwoven throughout the novel. The most notable topic of his irony is society. Mark Twain uses humor and effective writing to make The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn a satire of the American upper-middle class society in the mid-nineteenth century.
The first aspect of society Twain ridicules is its attempt at respectability. Huck Finn, a boy referred to as "white trash," has grown up totally believing what society has taught him. Society attempts to teach the difference between right and wrong, but focuses so much on book learning instead of virtues that children have a very misconceived idea about righteousness. A conversation between Tom Sawyer and his gang of robbers shows how the boys are influenced by society and believe they must follow exactly what is written regardless of what is right. "…'And keep them till they're ransomed.' ‘Ransomed? What's that?' ‘I don't know. But that's what they do. I've seen it in the books, and so of course that's what we've got to do.' ‘Well how can we do it if we don't know what it is?' ‘Why, blame it all, we've got to do it. Don't I tell you it's in the books? Do you want to go to doing different from what's in the books, and get things all muddled up?' " (pages 8-9) While ransoming someone is a crime and not acceptable, because of the way Huck has been raised, he has no clue that what Tom's gang wants to do is not permissible.
Twain also satirizes the hypocrisy of society. While Tom's Gang of Robbers was a...


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...mething very evil. Twain uses Jim to counter this concept, by allowing him to influence Huck to ultimately come to the conclusion that a black man is not inferior to the white man.
In the end, Twain must bring the freed Jim and Huck from their adventures on the river back into society. Jim discovers that all along he was a free man, and Aunt Sally decides to adopt Huck and civilize him, which he cannot stand. In the society that Huck and Jim lived, blacks were inferior to the whites, but Twain satirizes this fact by making them equals in his novel. The fact that killing people is acceptable and even humorous is another way Twain ridicules society. He proves that sometimes what is accepted and seemingly respectable is not always right. Mark Twain was very successful in writing an interesting, entertaining, and satirical novel, The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn.


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