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Essay on Richard Lovelace

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In the 17th century Britain a ’new wave’ of poets emerged, the one that would later be labelled the metaphysical poets. They had a very unique style that is very energetic, paradoxical, often enough to completely boggle the reader, and in a way entertaining for the way they hid their real point at times. How many times have we thought of them innocent, often thinking them to be saints and such? Certainly, in a way they are, but to enjoy reading them we have to be fully aware of the possible peiorativeness of their poems. But it’s not the only thing they wrote about. They also criticized the society although less likely. In my contrastive analysis I chose to analyse Richard Lovelace’s works, and make an attempt to assess what he was.
Richard Lovelace’s personality is just as unique as his works are. He was a royalist until death, and while others preferred ’liberty and freedom’, the Parliament, Lovelace still remained a royalist. He also had a military career, seemingly his love, Lucasta, was the general. Knowing that the army always made friendships, or even better brethrenships, ’trust laid’ in the neighbouring infantrymen, and the general was of the main concern. Going as far as that, we may be insisted that Lovelace was in fact homosexual to some extent.
Whatever the case is, he certainly had his own way to hide sexual meanings in his poems, that only a reader who is aware that renaissance poetry is never to be taken seriously, or at least not so seriously.
That’s most striking in his poem To Lucasta. The Rose. While the poem is about a couple, possibly a married one ,having a sexual intercourse,we might even think that the participants might be homosexual. Although the poem is about a woman giving a...


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...that possibly no-one could ’bear’. His character is a Paradox that shine gloriously, yet forgotten nowadays. How a royalist who was very close to the court of the King with such a taste remains a mystery, but we might think it that way because we tend to accompany kings, queens and their courts with a certain style that is most of the time very strict. And the same goes for the Renaissance, as we tend to think about Renaissance too seriously. But one should never, Renaissance is not a real serious age, and is full of fun, hidden behind words, that just need the right key to be opened, and thus open a world of pure entertainment for the reader. We just have to remember Joker’s famous quote: Why so serious?



Works Cited

Kenningston, W. C. H. World Wide School. 1863. August 12. http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/lit/poetry/TheLucastaPoems/chap1.html.


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Essay on Richard Lovelace - In the 17th century Britain a ’new wave’ of poets emerged, the one that would later be labelled the metaphysical poets. They had a very unique style that is very energetic, paradoxical, often enough to completely boggle the reader, and in a way entertaining for the way they hid their real point at times. How many times have we thought of them innocent, often thinking them to be saints and such. Certainly, in a way they are, but to enjoy reading them we have to be fully aware of the possible peiorativeness of their poems....   [tags: poetry, To Lucasta, The Rose, love]
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