Preview
Preview

Rationalizing Radicalism in "Crime and Punishment" vs. "Demons" by Dostoevsky

No Works Cited
Length: 1375 words (3.9 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Crime and Punishment and Demons by Dostoevsky are two novels that are directly reflective of the time that he spent in exile. Crime and Punishment was a precursor to Demons and laid the foundation for the psychological novel that would characterize these and a later novel by Dostoevsky.
Dostoevsky was made aware of the problems with Nihilistic ideas while he was exiled in Siberia. Crime and Punishment was Dostoevsky’s first attempt at a psychological analysis of a person’s inner struggles to rationalize this radicalism. Raskolnikov represents that intelligentsia and is being used by Dostoevsky to portray and warn against succumbing to these ideals. Dostoevsky uses Raskolnikov’s life to illustrate the implications and applications of this Nihilist to the public and then expands upon it in Demons.
Raskolnikov’s article “On Crime” offers insight to the inner workings of his brain. Porfiry, a police inspector, calls out Raskolnikov for the shortcomings in his article, contesting that the argument presented was not one that was thought out completely and underdeveloped. It could be inferred that the viewpoints of Raskolnikov are a reflection on the “new word” that has plagued his thoughts for so long.
“That men are in general divided by a law of nature into two categories, inferior (ordinary) . . . and men who have the gift or talent to utter a new word. . . . The second category all transgress the law. . . . for the most part they seek in very varied ways the destruction of the present for the sake of the better.”
Another aspect of this thought is the question of Raskolnikov’s belief in God. Raskolnikov engaged Porfiry in a debate rather than shy away from the question like many would assume a Nihilist to do. Raskolnikov uses th...


... middle of paper ...


...capacity to withstand tribulations can be seen through these two novels as well.
The novels were meant to serve a positive role as well. The readers were meant to decipher hope from the story due to the propensity to do good that existed in the story. The attacks on the Nihilistic were systematic by Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky had the hope that the institutions that wrote against would manage to destroy themselves and therefore save Russia from being consumed with devastating ideals. The readers are to let the hearts guide them to God in order to protect the same from the Nihilistic principles that include negative traits such as hate.
As a result of Dostoevsky’s diligence and commitment to making this effort effective the special things about Russia that are good and dear to the heart were saved. The faith in the common man is surprising and a typical of Dostoevsky.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay about The Extraordinary Man in Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" - The extraordinary man in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is presented in three fashions: the first is Dostoevsky's theory of the extraordinary man, the second is the main character's, Raskolnikov's notion of himself as an extraordinary man and the third is Dostoevsky's view of the protagonist's attachment to his self-identification with the extraordinary. Dostoevsky's ideas about the extraordinary man are given in Raskolnikov's speech to Porfiry Petrovich on pages 242 and 243. Dostoevsky's view is expressed as Raskolnikov's, and is concerned with defining what exactly an extraordinary man is....   [tags: extraordinary man, Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishmen] 1925 words
(5.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Comparing Degradation in Crime and Punishment, the Possessed, and the Brothers Karamazov - How much disintegration can a culture endure before it reaches the point of irreversible decay. The degree of disintegration and destruction that our own culture has experienced is probably not yet fully known, but mid-to late-Nineteenth Century Russian culture is another matter. The vicious nature of the attacks upon the "old forms" of Russian culture, especially those waged by the Nihilists of the late 1860s, provides ample material for exploring this important question. Fortunately, for those anxious about the condition of our own culture, Fyodor M....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 3894 words
(11.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - Slow slicing, or death by a thousand cuts, was a capital punishment in 900 A.D. China for those who committed brutal crimes, such as murder. In present day America, the use of lethal injection is one of many forms of capital punishment used to end the lives of an offender. It appears that people, throughout the centuries, have looked for a suitable way to punish a criminal. These punishments have a sole purpose, and that is to take the life of an offender. By taking the life of a wrong doer does not erase the crime nor does it help reform the criminal....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Resurrection of Lazarus in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay - Resurrection of Lazarus in Crime and Punishment In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskalnikov undergoes a period of extreme psychological upheaval. By comparing this death and rebirth of Raskalnikov's psyche to the story of the resurrection of Lazarus, Dostoevsky emphasizes not only the gravity of his crimes, but also the importance of acceptance of guilt. From the moment when Raskalnikov murders the old woman, his personality begins to change drastically. Dostoevsky challenges the reader to understand the madness which ensues by first demonstrating that the ideas and convictions to which Raskalnikov clung died along with the women....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 452 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Raskolnikov's Dream in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay - Raskolnikov's Dream in Crime and Punishment In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov's dream about the mare can be used as a vehicle to probe deeply into his mentality to discover how he really feels inside. The dream suggests that Raskolnikov is a "split" man; after all, his name in Russian means "split". His personality has a cruel and thoughtless side as well as a caring, compassionate side. Through the dream and the symbols therein, a reader can cast Raskolnikov, as well as other characters from Crime And Punishment, into any of the various parts in the dream....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 606 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Imperfect Conscience in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay - Crime and Punishment:  Imperfect Conscience               A highly educated individual, avoiding the hardships of society while pondering the possibility of great wealth, Raskolnikov, in Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment," frustrated with his immoral actions, suffers from an abrupt physical and mental breakdown after brutally mutilating a wicked pawnbroker. After this soul-scarring incident, the initial feelings of success in completing his mission quickly changes once he realizes possible flaws in his, otherwise considered, perfect murder....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 564 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel “Crime and Punishment” brings the reader a glimpse into the mind of a criminal, tormented by the guilt of murder. Dostoevsky’s focal point of the novel does not lie within the crime nor the punishment but everything in between. Dostoevsky also vividly depicts the life and conditions of poverty within the confines of St. Petersburg. Dostoevsky uses a unique and descriptive diction which takes the reader’s perspective and puts them in the mind of the murderer – Raskolnikov....   [tags: Fyodor Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1006 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Two Personalities of Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - The Two Personalities of Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov, the main character of the novel Crime and Punishment by Feodor Dostoevsky, actually possesses two completely contradicting personalities. One part of him is intellectual: cold, unfeeling, inhumane, and exhibiting tremendous self-will. It is this side of him that enables him to commit the most terrible crime imaginable - taking another human life. The other part of his personality is warm and compassionate. This side of him does charitable acts and fights against the evil in his society....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 572 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Sonia and Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay - Sonia and Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment Sonia and Raskolnikov are two characters that interact with each other in the novel, Crime and Punishment. They interact on multiple levels, sharing several likenesses. Both of these characters are at-times self-sacrificing, both are struggling for meaning in a dreary existence, and both are generally unhappy people, but brighten and seem to enjoy each other's presence--even when Raskolnikov is berating her religion. What is self-sacrifice, for which these characters and so many people around the world engage in....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 490 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Character of Dounia in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay - The Character of Dounia Crime and Punishment    Dounia's commitment to her brother is unfaltering. Even when she is presented with the ultimatum of Luzhin, she continues to endure in her dedication and loyalty to her irritable and rascally brother. She realizes that making sure Raskolnikov is there will probably secure her fate in that she will not marry Luzhin. She refuses to do so though if he does not accept his brother. Dounia's commitment and loyalty can be seen in her calm nature about the letter, her loyal response to it, and her actions when she goes to visit her brother--she regards his gestures and words with guarded skepticism, but realizes that he is at least "...   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 476 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]