Preview
Preview

Prison Reform in Russia and Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay

:: 2 Works Cited
Length: 1100 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The novel Crime and Punishment occurs in the summer of 1865; a time when radical legal and social changes swept through Russia. The reforms of 1860’s and 1870’s were known as the Great Reforms because they affected every aspect of Russian life. With “an 1861 decree emancipating the serfs and [a] monumental reform of the court system in 1864,” the Russian society was still transitioning from an Estate-of-the-realm style toward a more just system focused on equality (Burnham 1227). The reformed penal system is not just under the modern sense of justice, yet it provided a far greater level of equality than the previous model, dominated by aristocrats and government officials. Lagging behind a few years, Russia was following the trend of the other European countries by remodeling the penal and criminal justice system (Timasheff 16-18).
According to The Politics of Punishment: Prison Reform in Russia, Robbins Jr. asserts, “the Great Reforms of the 1860s set in motion a process that dramatically altered the Russian penal system” (1282). France and England already had reformed and well-established courts; thus, the Russians felt an urge to follow them (Historically speaking, from the days of the Enlightenment, Russia wanted to be considered a prosperous country like the great European nations, but its tyrannical government and social policies prevented it from doing so. Russia, the little stepbrother of the European states, looked from a distance at the splendor of the flourishing states to the west. Russia’s Czars, Peter and Catherine the great, attempted to model the country like a western state while retaining a unique Russian identity, and the nineteenth century illustrates this transition). Filled with a sense of p...


... middle of paper ...


...tally (Dostoevsky 350-355). Dostoevsky is cynical of the criminal justice system because not only does it cheat society, but also it cheats its own rules. This almighty governmental power is reminiscent the previous unjust systems. Talking about the dying horse in Raskolnikov’s dream, the people insist “she’s damn well going to gallop,” but Dostoevsky urges them not to beat the dead horse (57). A complete teardown and rebuilt seems like the only real solution to fixing the disorganized justice and penal system of Russia.
Dostoevsky uses Crime and Punishment to analyze and critique the transitioning legal and justice system of 1860’s Russia. He argues that the true purpose of the criminal justice system is to rehabilitate and restore an individual; society needs the institution since not everyone is as thoughtful and ultimately good-hearted as Raskolnikov.




Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Fyodor Dostoyevskys The House Of The Dead Essay - Fyodor Dostoyevsky's The House of the Dead Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky was born in Moscow on Nov. 11, 1825. As his father was a former military surgeon, Dostoyevsky grew up in the noble class. He entered the military engineering school at St. Petersburg at age 16. Shortly after graduating, he resigned his commission and devoted all his time to writing. However, he soon became caught up in the movement for political and social reform during the reign of Tsar Nicholas I. He began to participate in weekly discussions about the ideas of French utopian Socialists....   [tags: essays research papers] 782 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - Slow slicing, or death by a thousand cuts, was a capital punishment in 900 A.D. China for those who committed brutal crimes, such as murder. In present day America, the use of lethal injection is one of many forms of capital punishment used to end the lives of an offender. It appears that people, throughout the centuries, have looked for a suitable way to punish a criminal. These punishments have a sole purpose, and that is to take the life of an offender. By taking the life of a wrong doer does not erase the crime nor does it help reform the criminal....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - In Fyodor Dostoevsky book Crime and Punishment, women at this time in Russia were not the equals of men in terms of education and power. In Crime and Punishment the women in the story were self-sacrificing in their actions, which in return paid off for the women. Majority of women, in Crime and Punishment, such as Sonya were selfless in their actions. The women in this story play a motherly role towards the men. Women in this story may have lived in a male dominated society, but it seemed that the words the women spoke in this story were very strong in influencing the men....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1938 words
(5.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel “Crime and Punishment” brings the reader a glimpse into the mind of a criminal, tormented by the guilt of murder. Dostoevsky’s focal point of the novel does not lie within the crime nor the punishment but everything in between. Dostoevsky also vividly depicts the life and conditions of poverty within the confines of St. Petersburg. Dostoevsky uses a unique and descriptive diction which takes the reader’s perspective and puts them in the mind of the murderer – Raskolnikov....   [tags: Fyodor Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1006 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Christianity in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Essay - Fyodor Dostoyevsky wrote, It must have been a difficult task for Dostoevsky to come to this conclusion. He could be compared to that of the Prodigal son, who returned to God only after all other forms of belief were ventured. Being raised in a Russian Orthodox household, as a youth Dostoyevsky rebelled against religion and later began to believe in the anarchist and atheistic philosophy that was common among radical students and middle-class people that were against the status quo in 19th century Russia....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essay] 1514 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Describes Power and Masculinity - Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky is a psychological novel from the 19th century in Russia. This novel gives us a sense of the social, political and economic turmoil which Russia and its people were living through during that time period. During this period of hardship people would take the decisions that they would consider necessary for survival and this novel exposes some of the decisions that people had to make to keep on living. The decisions taken by the individuals of this novel may be a result of despair or just an overdose of power and masculinity....   [tags: russia, psychological, turmoil]
:: 1 Works Cited
1631 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, the theme of duality and the conflict between personal desires and morals is present throughout much of the novel. There are dual conflicts: one external between a disillusioned individual and his world, and the other internal between an isolated soul and his inner thoughts. It is the internal conflict in the main character, Raskolnikov, that is the focused on for much of the novel. The first of Rodya’s two sides is his intellectual side. This side of rodya is inhumane, and exhibiting extreme self-will and power....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
898 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - Crime And Punishment Section 1: Significance of Title The title Crime and Punishment is significant in the fact that Raskolnikov the main character commits and crime and faces punishment. This punishment is not just going to prison but psychological punishment too. His action haunts him the whole story. He does eventually go to jail though. This book shows that if someone commit’s a crime they will face punishment of some kind. Section 2: Author The author Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote his book Crime and Punishment from life experiences....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1318 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Conflict in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Within the tortured mind of a young Russian university student, an epic battle rages between two opposite ideologies - the conservative Christianity characteristic of the time, and a new modernist humanism gaining prevalence in academia. Fyodor Dostoevsky in the novel Crime and Punishment uses this conflict to illustrate why the coldly rational thought that is the ideal of humanism represses our essential emotions and robs us of all that is human. He uses the changes in Raskolnikov's mental state to provide a human example of modernism's effect on man, placing emphasis upon the student's quest for forgiveness and the effect of repressed emotion....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - What is the ideal purpose of punishing criminals, how do we know when punishment has been adequately served, what would be an appropriate, morally justifiable punishment for Raskolnikov, and why. Elbert Hubbard said, "We are punished by our sins, not for them." Prince Machiavelli created the Machiavellian code where he stated the "Eye for an eye" principle. What is the purpose of punishment. Why does human kind feel it necessary to punish wrong-doers. Hubbard believed that punishment is not necessary in order to reform criminals, yet Machiavelli believed in bringing to justice all who broke the law....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 869 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]