My Account
Preview
Preview

The Equal Rights Amendment Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1106 words (3.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Equal Rights Amendment


"Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged
by the United States or by any state on account of sex."

     In 1923, this statement was admitted to Congress under the Equal Rights
Amendment (ERA). The ERA was a proposed amendment to the United States
Constitution granting equality between men and women under the law. If the Era
was passed, it would have made unconstitutional any laws that grant one sex
different rights than the other. However, in the 1970s, the Era was not passed,
and therefore did not become law.

     The idea for an equal rights amendment first became acknowledged in the
early part of the twentieth century. In 1916, Alice Paul founded the National
Women's party (NWP), a political party dedicated to establishing equal rights
for women. Traditionally, women were viewed as weaker and inferior to men. The
purpose of the ERA was to prohibit any person from acting on this belief. Alice
Paul viewed that equality under the law was the foundation essential to full
equality for women.

     In November of 1922, the NWP voted to work for a federal amendment that
could guarantee women's equal rights regardless of legislatures' indecisions.
The NWP had 400 women lobbying for equality.

     Despite strong opposition by some women and men, the NWP introduced and
Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1923. In order to
become law, the amendment needed a two-thirds vote in both houses of the
congress of the United States, or a supporting petition of two-thirds of the
state legislatures. Then the amendment would have required ratification by
three-fourths of the states. However, it failed to get the two-thirds majority
required to move onto the states for approval. The proposed amendment also
failed in following sessions until 1972, when it won a majority vote in Congress.

The main objectives of the women's movement included equal pay for equal
work, federal support for day-care centers, recognition of lesbian rights,
continued legalization of abortion, and the focus of serious attention on the
problems of rape, wife and child beating, and discrimination against older and
minority women. The ERA would have addressed all of these issues if it were
passed.

     Had it been adopted, the ERA would have resolved the paradox of an
oppressed majorit...


... middle of paper ...


...t giving the Supreme Court and federal agencies
authority to spell out the meaning of equal rights would be risky. Decisions
made on such a level would be too far removed from the ideas and desires of the
people. Opponents felt that equal rights should be dealt with on a local or
state level where legislators can be voted out of position if the people do not
like some of the decisions made.

     Although the ERA did not pass, all of the actions made by NOW, NWP, and
any of the other women's movements, have greatly aided women in their battle
against sex discrimination in the work place, in educational institutions, and
in their roles as wives and mothers, and finally laid to rest the controversy
over protective legislation and equal rights.       Like the Fourteenth
Amendment, we are inclined to forget that the ERA was designed not to change
values but to modify behavior of mainstream citizens by changing the
constitutional status of a particular group. The ERA's purpose was and is to
provide equality of opportunity through the Constitution and legal system for
those women who want to realize full personal and professional expectations
within mainstream America.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Future of the Equal Rights Amendment Essay - "Everyone in our democracy deserves to be treated with fairness and justice, and to have that right in our constitution," stated former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson (Eisler and Hixson 419). Presently, half of our nation is not protected under the Constitution (Eisler and Hixson 419). The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was proposed in 1923 when Alice Paul concluded that women, although they had the right to vote, were not specifically protected from sexual discrimination by the Constitution. Seventy-five years have passed since the amendment was first introduced, and women still have not secured equal rights under law....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
:: 12 Works Cited
3627 words
(10.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Equal Rights Amendment Essay - The Equal Rights Amendment "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex."      In 1923, this statement was admitted to Congress under the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). The ERA was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution granting equality between men and women under the law. If the Era was passed, it would have made unconstitutional any laws that grant one sex different rights than the other. However, in the 1970s, the Era was not passed, and therefore did not become law....   [tags: Women Feminism Equality Essays] 1106 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Pros and Cons of the Equal Rights Amendment - Pros and Cons of the Equal Rights Amendment The Equal Rights Amendment began its earliest discussions in 1920. These discussions took place immediately after two-thirds of the states approved women's suffrage. The nineteenth century was intertwined with several feminist movements such as abortion, temperance, birth control and equality. Many lobbyists and political education groups formed in these times. One such organization is the Eagle Forum, who claims to lead the pro-family movement. On the opposite side of the coin is The National Organization for Women, or NOW, which takes action to better the position of women in society....   [tags: Suffrage Equality Gender] 1284 words
(3.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
How important was Phyllis Schlafly’s role in the defeat of the U.S. Equal Rights Amendment? - Plan of Investigation This investigation addresses the following question: How important was Phyllis Schlafly’s role in the defeat of the U.S. Equal Rights Amendment. In order to evaluate her importance, this investigation will address several factors that contributed to the defeat of the ERA, such as the negative portrayal of women by the press, the decriminalization of abortion, the split between feminists who wanted the ERA to pass and those who believed that its passage would lead to the deterioration of women’s protective laws, and the role of the Phyllis Schlafly and her Stop ERA campaign....   [tags: Politics]
:: 9 Works Cited
2097 words
(6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Significance of the 14th Amendment and Its Implications on the Constitution - Introduction The 14th Amendment to the Constitution of United States addressed the issues related to citizenship of the country and their fundamental rights for equality. This amendment is regarded as one of the most significant clauses in the US constitution since it provides the definition for citizenship, deals with the rights of the US citizens, and defines the state’s obligations to protect the rights of its citizens. This amendment was passed in the year 1866 by the Congress following the Civil War....   [tags: citizenship, equal rights]
:: 3 Works Cited
1017 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Equal Rights: Women's Rights Essay - What if women did not have the same rights as everyone else. What if there was a stereotype that women had to follow. Should a wife stay at home and take care of the children while her husband is out there working. These are all questions that women asked during the women’s Suffrage Movement. At the beginning of this movement, women did not have the same rights as their husbands or other men. Ladies had to follow a stereotype of being a teacher or nurse and once married staying home, taking care of the children and keeping the home in order while their husbands went to work....   [tags: wife, children, law, equality of rights]
:: 7 Works Cited
1249 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Amendments that Make U.S. Citizens Equal Essay - Wouldn’t it be wrong if the women in the United States could not vote. Aren’t elections about coming together as equal United States citizens to vote for a candidate. The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. The 19th amendment gave women the same rights as men. The 15th amendment of the US Constitution states, “ The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Freedom and equal right amendments are important because they represent what America stands f...   [tags: 15th amendment, freedom, 19th amendment] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Equal Rights for Lebanese Women Essay example - Equal Rights for Lebanese Women Throughout history, women have been dominated by men, and were not given their human rights, simply because they were women. Nevertheless, starting the eighteenth century, some women started showing their dissatisfaction with their unfair conditions. They came to realize that since they were human beings, then they must have equal rights as men. In this paper, I intend to show the historical back ground of the earliest women’s movements in the world, and to state the major achievement of these movements....   [tags: Equal Rights Women's Rights]
:: 5 Works Cited
1961 words
(5.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The US Constitution: The Difficulty of Adding an Amendment Essay - The United States Constitution is considered to be more concise as well as much older than the constitutions of other nations worldwide. Although the United States Constitution is mature, there are such a limited number of amendments that have been added to the Constitution since it was created. Only twenty-seven amendments, including the Bill of Rights, have been added to the Constitution since its creation. This is not due to amendments not being suggested, because over eleven thousand amendments have been contemplated; however, this is because the process of adding an amendment to the Constitution is an extremely long and difficult process....   [tags: american history, amendment]
:: 1 Works Cited
1000 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Fourteenth Ammendment and the Fight for Equal Rights - By the summer of 1865, the United States of America emerged from one struggle directly into another. After years of tension over state rights and slavery, the nation had exploded into a civil war, only to emerge bloodied but still intact. The question now was how to keep the nation intact, while protecting the freedmen and ensuring that the same powers that had ignited the war could come back to power. To Garrett Epps argues in his book Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post-Civil War America that the 14th Amendment passed by the 39th Congress of the United States was the penultimate reaction to ensure that recently freed slaves were guaranteed the...   [tags: Post-Civil War America]
:: 1 Works Cited
1114 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]