Preview
Preview

Science, Technology, and Morality in Shelley's Frankenstein Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1101 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



Frankenstein and Science  

Science is the knowledge gained by a systematic study, knowledge which then becomes facts or principles. In the systematic study; the first step is observation, the second step hypothesis, the third step experimentation to test the hypothesis, and lastly the conclusion whether or not the hypothesis holds true. These steps have been ingrained into every student of science, as the basic pathway to scientific discovery. This pathway holds not decision as to good or evil intention of the experiment. Though, there are always repercussions of scientific experiments. They range from the most simplistic realizations of the difference between acid and water to the principle that Earth is not the center of the Universe. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein depicts this very difference in the story of Victor Frankenstein. A scientist who through performing his experiments creates a monster which wreaks havoc upon humanity. Frankenstein concentrating wholly upon discovery ignores the consequences of his actions.

        Victor Frankenstein often esteemed himself a scientist of nature in contrast to those of his time who were alchemists. As such he followed the very same path which elementary school kids follow today; observation, hypothesis, experimentation, and conclusion. The first step he took in creating his monster was observation. Victor Frankenstein observe...


... middle of paper ...


...the story of the DeLacy’s, and from his own experiences the monster learned its evil ways.

         Science is not inherently evil and never will become evil. Though the knowledge gained from science can be used toward producing evil, intended or not, and can be dangerous. The story of Victor Frankenstein shows the irresponsibility possible in the advancement of science and furthers the caution which humanity must take when it attempts to master its environment or itself. The proponents of cloning humans today should remind themselves of the lesson which Victor Frankenstein before they have to deal with the products of their research and learn the hard way.

 

 


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Technology and Morality in Shelley's Frankenstein - The Advancement of Science - Frankenstein and the Advancement of Science       Science is nothing more than facts and principles that have been accepted on the basis of the knowledge gained by a systematic study. The scientific process is the common, basic pathway to this discovery of knowledge. The good or evil implications resulting from knowledge is not the primary concern of the scientist, though these implications can have a powerful impact. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein shows how the discovery of knowledge can have earth-shattering repercussions when a scientist does not consider the consequences of his actions....   [tags: Frankenstein essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1131 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Technology and Morality in Shelley's Frankenstein - Victor's Use of Science - Victor Frankenstein and His Use of Science Every spring there is a plethora of new animate beings. Creation is a yearly event for most animals. There are countless children born each day. All living beings procreate. Victor Frankenstein was a scientist, and the goal of science is to discover new information, and Victor Frankenstein was simply being a scientist and creating new information. When Victor Frankenstein created his monster, it could be compared to genetic engineering or cloning of today....   [tags: Frankenstein essays] 938 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Science and Morality in Shelley's Frankenstein - Consequences of Technology - The Consequences of Technology Revealed in Shelley's Frankenstein       In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, written in the late nineteenth century, the author proposes that knowledge and technology can be dangerous to individuals and all of humanity.  Frankenstein was one of the first cautionary tales about scientific research.  Shelley's novel offers profound insight of the consequences of morally insensitive scientific and technological research.   Learn from me. . . at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how  much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow...   [tags: Frankenstein essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1685 words
(4.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Science, Morality and Responsibility in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Science vs. Morality and Responsibility in Frankenstein The most frightening horror story can only be called such if it is believable. Nothing is so unnerving as lying awake at night with very real fears. No monster can harm you, unless the monster was genetically engineered by a mad scientist. The theme of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - scientific investigation without consideration of morality and responsibility - is a very relevant topic in today's world. This theme, along with the less obvious themes of revenge, prejudice against deviation from the norm, and fate all make Frankenstein one of the most unique and terrifying horror novels ever....   [tags: Frankenstein essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2006 words
(5.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Science, Technology, and Morality as Perceived in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein -    In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley challenges the motives and ethical uncertainties of the scientific developments of her time. This critique has become increasingly relevant as modern scientists endeavor into previously unimagined realms of the natural world through the use of cloning and genetic engineering. Through careful analysis, we can see how the novel illustrates both the potential dangers of these exploits and the irony of the conflicts between science and creationism.      Prior to the birth of the story, Mary Shelley had begun to learn of advancements and speculation in the scientific world of the early nineteenth century; in Frankenstein's introduction, editor M....   [tags: Frankenstein essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
1968 words
(5.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Ethical Issues in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Mary Shelley expresses various ethical issues by creating a mythical monster called Frankenstein. There is some controversy on how Mary Shelley defines human nature in the novel, there are many features of the way humans react in situations. Shelley uses a relationship between morality and science, she brings the two subjects together when writing Frankenstein, and she shows the amount of controversy with the advancement of science. There are said to be some limits to the scientific inquiry that could have restrained the quantity of scientific implications that Mary Shelley was able to make, along with the types of scientific restraints....   [tags: Ethic, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein,] 1228 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Exploring Deep Issues Through the Gothic Genre in Mary Shelley's Chapter 5 of Frankenstein - Exploring Deep Issues Through the Gothic Genre in Mary Shelley's Chapter 5 of Frankenstein Introduction: Mary Shelly inquires into many issues using the Gothic genre. Shelly explores the theme of religion according to the society that she had lived in. Shelly also explores loneliness through Victor Frankenstein and the creation of Victor, the monster. Mary explores the taboo issues of Victorian society through her novel and looks deeply into the idea of 'playing God' using Victor; she investigates through her novel human anatomy and science which were great discoveries and issues in the Victorian era....   [tags: Frankenstein, Mary Shelley] 1390 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay examples - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Mary Shelley’s, Frankenstein, was written during a period of dramatic revolution. The failed French Revolution and Industrial Revolution seriously mark the novel with hints of moral and scientific revolution. Through Frankenstein, Shelley sends out a clear message that morally irresponsible scientific development can unleash a monster that can destroy its creator. Upon beginning the creation process, Victor Frankenstein uses the scientific advances of others to infiltrate the role of nature....   [tags: Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 521 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Technology and Morality in Shelley's Frankenstein - Is Knowledge Always Evil? - Frankenstein: Is Knowledge Always Evil. As of this writing, I have decided to regard the local TV channel's "The more you know..." commercials as being evil. I do not understand how anyone could regard "knowledge" as anything but evil. "The more you know..." the more your mind feels the need to explorer for more knowledge and the more evil it will encounter. The more you search, the more ignorant you realize you are and the more open to pain you become. Who needs to have the knowledge possessed by God or the knowledge of creation from nothing....   [tags: Frankenstein essays] 961 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Evolution of Frankenstein - The Evolution of Frankenstein Not so long ago, relative to the world at large, in picturesque Geneva not so far from Lake Leman, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley took part in a not so commonplace "contest". The contest was to write a ghost story. The outcome was Frankenstein; what is considered today to be a classic, one of the first science fiction tales, and a story immortalized many times over in film. And what at its inception was considered little more than the disturbed and ill conceived writings of a woman by some, and a noble if misplaced effort by others....   [tags: Frankenstein, Mary Shelley] 2091 words
(6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]