Preview
Preview

Comparing Death in Araby and The Metamorphosis Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 974 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



Death in Araby and The Metamorphosis  

Many readers have commented on the contrast of light and darkness in the story Araby by James Joyce. Perhaps the death of the priest in Araby adds to the "darkness" that the boy experiences when he is thinking about Mangan's sister, as contrasted with the light he experiences when he is actually in her presence.

It is interesting that the death of the priest does not become so "dark" until Mangan's sister is introduced. In the first scene where the boy visits the priest's old room, he rummages around and finds some treasures, including "paper-covered books," and "the late tenant's rusty bicycle pump." There is no sense of gloom here, in fact, the boy seems to be having fun exploring and discovering things, and reminisces about how the priest "had been a very charitable priest" in a rather disconnected way.

But later, after the boy's crush on Mangan's sister has been introduced, this dead priest's room takes on a very different character. This is the place where the boy retreats on a stormy night while his emotions are churning inside him. It is no longer a place to explore, but has taken on almost a "sacred" character. Here the boy experiences his most impassioned moment of "strange prayers and praises," pressing the palms of his hands together "until they trembled, murmuring: 'Oh Love! Oh Love!' many times." You can almost feel the presence of the dead priest in the room on this "dark rainy evening" as the boy is praying, in a way that you would not feel his presence if he were merely on vacation.

The fact that he has died here in this very room adds to the drama and it intensifies the boy's emotions. Maybe the boy was thinking that the priest was watching him from he...


... middle of paper ...


...ere really what the family needed to start living their own lives.

In this story the "deaths" of Gregor serve to make obvious where he really stands in the family, and what the real situation is. If he had not turned into a bug and ultimately died, neither he nor the family would have ever known that what he was doing for them wasn't really helping them. Gregor's deaths also showed that the family didn't really care that much about him, and weren't that grateful for his sacrifices. It brings out the contrast between what Gregor was willing to do for his family (die) and what his family was willing to do for him (not very much). They wanted to get rid of him once his condition started demanding too much from them.

Gregor's death turns him into a sort of tragic hero. If the story ended differently, I think readers would feel less sympathetic towards him.

 


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Reality of World in Araby and Boys and Girls Essay - Our perception about the world change as we grow up and experience the reality of life. This is the necessary and universal experience that we all must undergo to face the world successfully. The protagonists in James Joyce’s “Araby” and Alice Munro’s “Boys and Girls experience a common initiation of how different the world is, compared to how they would like to see. The reader is given a glance into the lives of two adolescents. The protagonists in both stories are of the growing age and their perceptions about the world change....   [tags: Boys and Girls, Araby Essays] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Inexistence of Father Christmas in Araby Essay - “Araby” tells a story about a little boy’s romance and his disillusionment in the end. While people tend to focus on the ending of the story trying to find some clue from Araby the market alone, I believe there is another site that we should not forget—the room where the priest died. It seems Araby symbolizes the numb, dark adult world while the room is holy, romantic; but as I read more, I find they are quite the same. Comparing the two buildings, one of the hidden reasons for the boy’s anger dawned on me: he is deceived by both sites....   [tags: Araby Essays] 568 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Frankenstein and Araby Essay - The delineation of female characters in “Frankenstein” and “Araby” is in a very passive manner. Both Mary Shelley and James Joyce urges the readers to ponder upon the then existing social status of women. The women in these works of fiction are treated as material goods and have minimal privileges with respect to the male character. In Frankenstein, Elizabeth Lavenza is depicted as an object with minimal rights and privileges. She is portrayed as a possession for Victor Frankenstein to protect. In the same manner, Araby explicates the character of Mangan’s sister as a submissive sex....   [tags: Frankenstein, Araby]
:: 3 Works Cited
1485 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Symbolism In Araby, by James Joyce Essay - James Joyce: Symbols of Religion in his short story Araby Alongside the dawn of the twentieth century appeared an author by the name of James Joyce. Joyce introduced the idea that language can be manipulated and transformed into a new original meaning. 'Some critics considered the work a masterpiece, though many readers found it incomprehensible' (The Literature 1). Joyce’s stories were not welcomed with open, inviting arms; instead they were undesired by publishers and his books were immensely misunderstood by the majority who gave them a glance....   [tags: Araby Essays] 1293 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Joyce's Araby: a Double Focus Essay - Boy or Man: the Double Focus On one hand "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. Although the quest ends in failure, it results in an inner awareness and the boy's first step into manhood. On another hand the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who reflects back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight. James Joyce's fascinating double focus: the boy's first experience, and the man's reflection to the unforgotten moments of his childhood provides for the dramatic rendering of a simple story of first love told by a narrator who, with his wider adult vision, can employ the sophisticated use...   [tags: Araby Essays] 790 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby - The Lonely Quest in Araby Essay - The Lonely Quest in "Araby"           Universality of experience makes James Joyce's "Araby" interesting, readers respond instinctively to an experience that could have been their own. It is part of the instinctual nature of man to long for what he feels is the lost spirituality of his world. In all ages man has believed that it is possible to search for and find a talisman, which, if brought back, will return this lost spirituality. The development of theme in "Araby" resembles the myth of the quest for a holy talisman....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1298 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Araby, by James Joyce Essay - The story, "Araby" by James Joyce, is a short story about a young boy's life and his quest to impress the young girl for whom he has feelings. The protagonists to the young boy, including the young girl, are the boy's uncle, and the people at the Bazaar booth. The initial point of conflict occurs when the girl informs the boy that she cannot attend the bazaar, as she has every other year. "She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat that week in her convent" (Joyce 106)....   [tags: Araby Essays] 951 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby Essay - Araby: Joycean Romanticism of the Church Life is filled with loneliness and times when a person feels unsure. When these times arise is when most people turn to their faith in the church or faith in fate. Certain events in one’s life can send them reeling for something that they can find solace in. Security from the turbulent world is given through faith and hope. When times are at there hardest what can you do. Without faith you can get stuck, and slowly dragged down by the world decaying around you....   [tags: Araby Essays] 723 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Franz Kafka's Metamorphisis Essay examples - Gregor Samsa awakes one morning to discover that he has been transformed into a repugnant vermin. One may never know what initiated this makeover, but the simple truth is that Gregor is now a bug, and everyone must learn to live and move on in this strenuous situation. In Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, the characters that interact with Gregor, including his mother, his father, and his sister Grete, must come to terms with his unfortunate metamorphosis, and each does so by reacting in a unique way....   [tags: Franz Kafka Metamorphosis] 958 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Kafka's Metamorphosis Essay - Kafka's Metamorphosis "As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect" (Kafka 1757). This opening is famous not only for its startling content but also for its calm, matter-of-fact style which then sets the tone for the rest of the story. Along with Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Dante's Inferno, Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" has one of the most-memorized and most attention-catching opening lines....   [tags: Metamorphosis essays] 768 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]