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Racism in in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye Essay

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Both Toni Morrison's novel about an African American family in Ohio during the 1930s and 1940s, The Bluest Eye and Louise Erdrich;s novel about the Anishinabe tribe in the 1920s in North Dakota, Tracks are, in part, about seeing.  Both novels examine the effects of a kind of seeing that is refracted through the lens of racism by subjects of racism themselves.  Erdrich's Pauline Puyat and Morrison's Pecola Breedlove are crazy from their dealings with racism and themselves suffer from an internalized racism that is upheld and maintained by social and cultural structures within which they live.  Pauline and Pecola become the embodiment of world sickness, of social pathologies as they become increasingly alienated from their bodies.

Pecola, driven to want blue eyes by her observations that is is those with blue who receive and thus "deserve" love, eventually loses her mind after she experiences repeated violence at home, at school, and on the street.  These violences are all rooted in racism.  Pecola begins to believe the lie of racism: that to be black...


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