Preview
Preview

Raskolnikov's Dream in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 606 words (1.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Raskolnikov's Dream in Crime and Punishment



In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov's dream about the mare can be used as a vehicle to probe deeply into his mentality to discover how he really feels inside. The dream suggests that Raskolnikov is a "split" man; after all, his name in Russian means "split". His personality has a cruel and thoughtless side as well as a caring, compassionate side. Through the dream and the symbols therein, a reader can cast Raskolnikov, as well as other characters from Crime And Punishment, into any of the various parts in the dream. Each part that a character plays leads to a different conclusion about that character. Raskolnikov himself "fits" into the positions of Mikolka, the child, and the mare.

If Mikolka, the drunken owner of the mare, were to represent Raskolnikov, then the mare would most probably represent Alyona Ivanovna. The senseless beating of the mare by Mikolka is similar to the brutal attack on Alyona by Rodion. (It should be noted that both Alyona and the mare were female.) These heartless attacks foreshadow ...


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Raskolnikov’s Character Development in Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Ethics is defined as moral principles that govern a person or group’s behavior. Ethics have always played a crucial role in determining different kinds of cultures and what kind of reputation a certain group of individuals holds. In North American culture, we determine our ethics as being brought up by certain standards that determine what kind of person we ought to be. By contrast, other cultures have different approaches as to what is ethically “correct” or acceptable. Ethics incremented in Russian culture for example, contrast dramatically with classic American ideals....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1083 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment - My name is Raskolnikov Essay - Crime and Punishment - My name is Raskolnikov         It is obvious that Raskolnikov did not kill Alyona. Nikolai did. He confessed, didn't he. Sure, sure, I know what you're saying: Raskolnikov confessed too. But it is obvious that his confession was not a true confession. Raskolnikov had seen Nikolai's true confession, and was so moved that he decided he'd like to try confessing too. And one must not overlook the Christ symbolism in the novel. Raskolnikov is the obvious Christ-figure; he's poor, he's generous, he's schizophrenic....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Nature and Nurture in Crime and Punishment Essay - Nature and Nurture in Crime and Punishment     In the news today there is an article about a high-school boy who brought guns to school and shot several students. The parents of the victims are suing various computer game companies saying that the violent games present shooting and killing people as pleasurable and fail to portray realistic consequences. A representative of one of the companies released a statement saying that this is another example of individuals seeking to elude responsibility that has become so common in our society....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1377 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Dreams in Crime and Punishment: Raskolnikov - ... Without this technique the characters would stay on a more undeveloped level because the reader would not be able to fully comprehend their individual views on the world and how they clash with society. As a result the dreams that are included within the book help to both further the characterization and conflicts of some of the characters. The dreams, however, are in some cases not explicitly obvious and therefore become more like hallucinations, leaving it up to the reader to determine what is real and what is just a creation formed in one of the character’s minds....   [tags: socialism, norms, law]
:: 1 Works Cited
1441 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - Before the interactive oral, I noticed the numerous dreams and hallucinations in the novel Crime and Punishment, but I was not quite able to grasp the deeper meaning of some of the dreams and hallucinations. After this interactive oral, I see how important dreams are in this novel. They serve to illuminate the state of a character in a way that would not otherwise be clear. During this interactive oral, it was pointed out that the dreams in this novel are very influential to a character’s state of mind and actions....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1580 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, the theme of duality and the conflict between personal desires and morals is present throughout much of the novel. There are dual conflicts: one external between a disillusioned individual and his world, and the other internal between an isolated soul and his inner thoughts. It is the internal conflict in the main character, Raskolnikov, that is the focused on for much of the novel. The first of Rodya’s two sides is his intellectual side. This side of rodya is inhumane, and exhibiting extreme self-will and power....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
898 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Essay - One of the aspects of Crime and Punishment that stands out is that it is much more than a simple crime story. It is in fact a great study of the mind of a murder. Raskolnikov is a terrifying but sympathetic main character precisely because he is just twisted enough, just ill enough, for the reader to believe anyone is capable of such atrocities. The jumping off point for Raskolnikov is his idea of extraordinary and ordinary people. Looking at his theory and applying it as a tool for analysis of Raskolnikov himself leads not only to a deeper understanding of this idea but also of Raskolnikov....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1488 words
(4.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Struggle in Crime and Punishment - The Struggle in Crime and Punishment Reading this book makes you ill because from the beginning to the end you watch as psychological forces eat away at the thoughts and actions of their victim causing him to finally confess to the hideous crime he has committed. The story is basically the struggle between Raskolnikov's Napoleon-übermensch theory and his conscience which make him confess to his crime. Dostoevsky's genius is in describing how Raskolnikov struggles in his thoughts and actions. His thoughts become increasingly disjointed and desperate and his actions show that he has an increasing need to escape the uncertainty of being convicted, to talk about the crime, to confess, and to...   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1530 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Guilt in Crime and Punishment Essay - Guilt in Crime and Punishment   In Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky tells a story of a young man that has been forced out of his studies at a university, by poverty. In these circumstances, he develops his theory of an extraordinary man (Frank 62). This conjecture is composed of the ideas that all great men must climb over obstacles in their way to reach their highest potential and benefit human kind. In Raskolnikov's life, the great obstacle is his lack of money, and the way to get over this obstacle is to kill a pawnbroker that he knows....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 1264 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Conflict in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Within the tortured mind of a young Russian university student, an epic battle rages between two opposite ideologies - the conservative Christianity characteristic of the time, and a new modernist humanism gaining prevalence in academia. Fyodor Dostoevsky in the novel Crime and Punishment uses this conflict to illustrate why the coldly rational thought that is the ideal of humanism represses our essential emotions and robs us of all that is human. He uses the changes in Raskolnikov's mental state to provide a human example of modernism's effect on man, placing emphasis upon the student's quest for forgiveness and the effect of repressed emotion....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]