My Account
Preview
Preview

An Analysis of Singing to Wolves Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 930 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

An Analysis of “Singing to Wolves”       

 

The poem,  “Singing to Wolves” is a modern poem,  that tries to explain to the reader how wonderful solitude is,  but also considers it’s negative side,  with the example of a lonely girl.  The poem starts off with a brief encounter into the history of Wales,  and talks about the Llanthony monks,  who the reader is told were unloved by the Welsh,  and thus driven to a lonely life in the wilderness.  By reading this poem,  it seems as though being unloved is a popular reason for solitude.  After this brief insight into Wales’ history the reader is then taken back to the realms of modern day living.

 

“Why should we stay here singing to wolves?”

 

This opening sentence seems to act as a kind of question,  which is answered in the course of the poem.  At first it sounds like a stupid thing to do,  but eventually the reader realises that the wolves become very symbolic in the poem.  Wolves are thought of as being ruthless hunters of the wilderness,  and one could hardly imagine them being impressed by the singing of any person.

For the monks the Wolves were those that despised them (the Welsh),  and by “singing” to them,  they were actually trying to convince them of their belief etc.  And seeing as no-one ever listened to them,  they may as well sing to the wolves,  as they take just as much notice of them.

         However the wolves also have another interesting metaphorical meaning in the poem.  These days they no longer roam Britain,  and have all died out,&nb...


... middle of paper ...


...flowers…”

 

Another interesting thing that the poet makes use of is semicolons.  These are used throughout the three stanza’s.  The point of these semicolons is to make the sentences seem longer,  and bring a certain amount of continuity to it.

 

“…said Llanthony monks;  and left for soft living…”

 

Once one has recognised the ideas behind the text,  one realises that the poem tries to make the reader think about the world he lives in,  and maybe even prompt him into looking more deeply into his way of life,  and try not to simply follow the pattern that everybody else makes.  The poet has don this by using the example of the monks in the past years,  and the little girl in our modern world.  Maybe he wants the reader to find a medium between becoming a statistic,  and singing to wolves.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
A Glimpse into the Past with "Dances With Wolves" Essay - Dances with Wolves is an epic film made in the year nineteen ninety shot in South Dakota and Wyoming. The film tells the story of a Civil War-era and a United States Army officer, Lieutenant Dunbar who travels to the American frontier to find a military post and befriends a local Sioux tribe. It shows how life was in times of the Civil War. The movie also shows how Indians lived and how they respected everything except the white men. This film tells the story of Lieutenant Dunbar, a United States Army Officer and a Indian tribe who eventually in time after meeting become friends....   [tags: Dances With Wolves, Native Americans, ] 644 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Dances with Wolves: Changing from a Dignified Solider to a Sioux Warrior - In the movie Dances with Wolves Lieutenant John Dunbar is a dynamic character; changing throughout the film from a dignified United States Army soldier, to a passionate Lakota Sioux member. On his journey, Dances With Wolves takes in many experiences many have only dreamt about. When he rides Cisco out onto the battlefield in a suicide attempt, he has no idea that he indeed will live and will never lead the same life again. John Dunbar changed in many ways reflected upon in the film, including: mindset, clothing, and his sense of identity; it is though these character traits that Dances With Wolves discovers that inside everyone is a frontier just waiting to be explored....   [tags: Dances with Wolves,] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves Essay - Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves    In his novel, ”Dances With Wolves”,  Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader.             Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.)  Tone can be defined as the emotion or feeling set upon a reader during a novel/short story. Most times, the tone will change. It can change from sad to dramatic, happy to angry, angry to calm, or basically anything else....   [tags: Dances With Wolves] 437 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake - Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake is a novel that covers the topics of cross-culture, equality and respect. It also shows me the history of modern America. Reading this novel is a great adventure to me. Through years of getting ready, Michael Blake spent nine months on writing the book and got it done in 1981. The story happens in 1863, when US civil war was in ongoing. Knowing the potential amputation of his wounded leg, Union Army Officer Lieutenant John J. Dunbar turns suicidal and rides a horse to attract the enemy during a strange standoff....   [tags: Michael Blake Dances Wolves] 1818 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves Essay - Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves In Kevin Costner's motion picture Dances With Wolves, a white veteran of the Civil War, John Dunbar, ventures to the American frontier, where he encounters a tribe of Sioux Indians. At first, both parties are quite wary and almost hostile to each other, but after some time, Dunbar realizes that they have both grown to love and value each other as friends. As the movie critic Robert Ebert comments, "Dunbar possesses the one quality he needs to cut through the entrenched racism of his time: He is able to look another man in the eye, and see the man, rather than his attitudes about the man....   [tags: Dances With Wolves Film Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1805 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dances With Wolves Analysis Essay - Dances With Wolves Analysis The movie "Dances With Wolves" was produced in 1990 and directed by Kevin Costner who starred as the main character. "Dances with Wolves" tells us the story of a white man who gets acquainted with the Sioux, who learns to love and respect them as valuable people with a culture and who discovers how wrong white people's preconceived ideas about Native Americans are. A sense of adventure and drama is the feeling "Dances with Wolves" gives us. With this movie, Costner made his debut as a film director....   [tags: Movies Native Americans History Papers]
:: 3 Works Cited
2122 words
(6.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Dances With Wolves Essay - Dances With Wolves In his movie Dances With Wolves actor Kevin Costner tries to do away with any preconceived notions that the viewer might have had about the Native American Indians being a savage and inhuman race. He does this by first unraveling the mysteriousness of the Indians then he brings the viewer to a point of connectedness with the Indians and their culture. We then come to a sincere appreciation for them as human beings and individuals and find ourselves siding with them in matters of allegiance....   [tags: Film Movie Dances With Wolves Papers] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Wolves, Wild, Again Essay - Wolves, Wild, Again For my last web paper, I thought I'd return to one of my childhood obsessions - wolves. Ever since seeing a cartoon rendition of the story "Mowgli's Brothers" from The Jungle Book (the real thing, not the horrible Disney "interpretations" of it) I fell in love with the idea of wolf-hood. Wolves were once an essential part of our "American culture" and although we drove them away and killed them off in our own country long ago, their importance in the American mind has not decreased....   [tags: Animals Wolves Nature Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1324 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim and I Hear America Singing - A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim and I Hear America Singing America the great, land of freedom, home of the brave--each of these phrases has been used to describe the United States of America. Walt Whitman was a man who lived through many tough times in this country, but who would prosper as a poet. He was personally affected by all of the death and destruction that he witnessed during the Civil War. "A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim" and "I Hear America Singing" have some fascinating similarities but include many differences....   [tags: Hear America Singing Essays] 807 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Singing Essay - SINGING Singing, to me, is not just a hobby. It is a lifestyle and it is also what I enjoy most. To the uneducated eye, singing appears to be a simple process. However, that thought is far from accurate. There are several reasons that have prompted me to become the singer and performer I am today. Many of which are attributed to the beauty of vocal technique and a desire to learn more about the internal instrument that I am so lucky to possess. If one is to ask any singer or teacher of voice, they will explain that it is imminent to understand how the voice works and how to obtain proper breathing in order to take the first steps in becoming a singer....   [tags: Voice] 441 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]