Preview
Preview

William Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 916 words (2.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



      William Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey

     

      As students, we are taught that William Wordsworth's basic tenets of

      poetry are succinct: the use of common language as a medium, common man as

      a subject, and organic form as an inherent style. Yet beyond these

      rudimentary teachings, it should be considered that it was the intimacy

      with nature that was imperative to the realization of Wordsworth's goals

      set forth in the "Preface" to Lyrical Ballads. In his "Preface,"

      Wordsworth states, "Poetry is the image of man and nature" (Norton 247). A

      study of "Tintern Abbey," the intended finale and last impression of the

      Lyrical Ballads, reveals Wordsworth's conviction that the role of nature

      is the force and connection that binds mankind not only to the past and

      the future, but to other human beings as well. Regardless of the language

      employed, the subject used, or the method of delivery, it was the primal

      connection with nature that fueled Wordsworth's poetic genius.

 

      Wordsworth begins the journey into "Tintern Abbey" by taking the reader

      from the height of a mountain stream down into the valley where the poet

      sits under a sycamore...


... middle of paper ...


...
      together even after his death.

 

      Over two hundred years after it was written, "Tintern Abbey" continues to

      uphold the essence of William Wordsworth's beliefs and continues to touch

      the emotions of its readers. Even though, here in the twenty-first

      century, the term real-world has a connotation of life in the fast-lane,

      the real world - the natural world - of Wordsworth's time still holds a

      place of eminence both in literature and in the hearts of its readers.

      Certainly, Wordsworth would be pleased to see how very far into the future

      his vision has endured.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
William Wordsworth's Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey Essay - William Wordsworth's "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" Whereas most individuals tend to see nature as a playhouse that should alter and self-destruct to their every need, William Wordsworth had a very different view. Wordsworth perceived nature as a sanctuary where his views of life, love, and his creator were eventually altered forever. The intensity of Wordsworth's passion for nature elevated him from a boy into the inspiring man and poet in which he is recognized to be today....   [tags: William Wordsworth Tintern Abbey Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
2727 words
(7.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
William Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey Essay - William Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey As students, we are taught that William Wordsworth's basic tenets of poetry are succinct: the use of common language as a medium, common man as a subject, and organic form as an inherent style. Yet beyond these rudimentary teachings, it should be considered that it was the intimacy with nature that was imperative to the realization of Wordsworth's goals set forth in the "Preface" to Lyrical Ballads....   [tags: Tintern Abbey Essays] 916 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Above Tintern Abbey and Intimations of Immortality by William Wordsworth - The poems, “Above Tintern Abbey” and “Intimations of Immortality written by the poet, William Wordsworth, pertain to a common theme of natural beauty. Relaying his history and inspirations within his works, Wordsworth reflects these events in each poem. The recurring theme of natural beauty is analogous to his experiences and travels. Wordsworth recognizes the connections nature enables humans to construct. The beauty of a “wild secluded scene” (Wordsworth, 1798, line 6) allows the mind to bypass clouded and obscured thinking accompanied with man made environments....   [tags: poetry, natural beauty]
:: 3 Works Cited
982 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of William Wordsworth's Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey - Analysis of William Wordsworth's Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey William Wordsworth poem 'Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey'; was included as the last item in his Lyrical Ballads. The general meaning of the poem relates to his having lost the inspiration nature provided him in childhood. Nature seems to have made Wordsworth human.The significance of the abbey is Wordsworth's love of nature. Tintern Abbey representes a safe haven for Wordsworth that perhaps symbolizes a everlasting connection that man will share with it's surroundings....   [tags: tintern abbey poetry wordsworth]
:: 1 Works Cited
1061 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Influence of Nature in Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth - The Influence of Nature in Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth In "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," William Wordsworth explains the impact of Nature from Tintern Abbey in his every day life. "Tintern Abbey" shows the great importance of nature to Wordsworth in his writings, love for life, and religion. The memories he has of Tintern Abbey make even the darkest days full of light. As a result of Wordsworth's many memories of Tintern Abbey, his life appears to be happy....   [tags: William Wordsworth Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
675 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Taoist Reading of Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth Essay - missing works cited Wordsworth's 'hsü': towards a Taoist reading of Tintern Abbey Five years have passed; five summers, with the length Of five long winters. And again I hear These waters, rolling from their mountain springs With a sweet inland murmur. (1-4) "Tintern Abbey"'s opening lines prepare the reader for a reunion, notable in tone not only for the sense of anticipation with which the poet apprehends this moment, but equally so for the poignancy which immediately inflects the poem's proceedings....   [tags: Poetry Religion Taoism] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing John Constable's Painting The Cornfield and William Wordsworth's Poem Tintern Abbey - Representations of Time: Wordsworth and Constable I do not know how without being culpably particular I can give my Reader a more exact notion of the style in which I wished these poems to be written, than by informing him that I have at all times endeavored to look steadily at my subject; consequently, I hope that there is in these Poems little falsehood of description, and my ideas are expressed in language fitted to their respective importance. Something I must have gained by this practice, as it is friendly to one property of all good poetry, namely, good sense; but it has necessarily cut me off from a large portion of phrases and figures of speech which from father to son have long...   [tags: Wordsworth Constable Art Poetry Painting]
:: 1 Works Cited
1607 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Use of Landscape as form of Expression in Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth - Missing Works Cited My last two presentations have argued that Wordsworth is a split and exiled, yet transcendent and visionary poet who creates community by inserting the idealized Romantic poet into the ideological center interpellating those around him into similar subject positions. But, how can Wordsworth, a separated individual, reveal his heightened awareness to the rest of humanity. He answers in his "Preface to Lyrical Ballads" when he asserts that poets like himself can communicate their alternate awareness "[u]ndoubtably with our moral sentiments and animal sensations, and with the causes which excite these; with the operations of the elements and the appearances of the visib...   [tags: Poetry Papers Essays] 2367 words
(6.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Theme of William Wordsworth as a Prophet in Tintern Abbey Essay - Poet as Prophet When I spoke last, I ended with the image of Wordsworth as a monk or priest-like figure zealously converting Dorothy and, by extension, the reader into a position within his vision of the world. But even more than priest, Wordsworth often depicts the romantic poet as prophet. This depiction is demonstrated more clearly in "The Prospectus to the Recluse" than in "Tintern Abbey." In the 1814 version of the "Prospectus" he writes: Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields -- like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main -- why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of...   [tags: Poetry Papers Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1480 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Felicia Hemans and To My Own Portrait versus William Wordsworth and Tintern Abbey - Visions of the Past: Felicia Hemans & William Wordsworth I will here attempt to give an idea of the links between Felicia Hemans and William Wordsworth. I will begin with a brief biography of Hemans, followed by a look at the relationship between Hemans and Wordsworth. I will end with a short comparison of Hemans' poem "To My Own Portrait" and "Tintern Abbey." Hemans' Biography [1] Born Felicia Dorothea Browne in Liverpool in 1793 and raised in North Wales, Hemans was largely home-schooled by her mother....   [tags: poetry comparison]
:: 4 Works Cited
2718 words
(7.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]