My Account
Preview
Preview

Gettysburg Address Analysis Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 990 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Political Speech Analysis Gettysburg Address Analysis Undoubtedly his most famous speech that he gave throughout his presidential years was his Gettysburg Address…… On the first three days of July 1863, the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, had fought the Army of the Potomac, the principal northern army, to which General George G. Meade had been assigned command only four days earlier. In early May, Lee had won a smashing victory at Chancellorsville, Virginia, over a Union force approximately twice as large, then had boldly determined to carry the war to the enemy by invading Pennsylvania. Drawn into an offensive battle at Gettysburg, Lee attacked both wings of the Union army before launching an attack on the center in the third day of fighting. That assault, led by Major General George E. Pickett, had approached success before Union forces rallied. The three-day battle cost the North 17,684 men killed and wounded; the South lost 22,638. The failure of Pickett's charge, sometimes labeled the high-water mark of the Confederacy, compelled Lee to withdraw from Pennsylvania. However, Meade failed to conduct the vigorous pursuit that Lincoln wanted. On July 7, Lincoln had spoken to a crowd assembled at the White House to celebrate the twin Union victories at Gettysburg and at Vicksburg, Mississippi, the key to control of the Mississippi River), which had surrendered on July 4. Lincoln gave an awkward speech: "How long ago is it?—eighty-odd years—since on the Fourth of July for the first time in the history of the world) a nation by its representatives, assembled and declared as a self-evident truth that 'all men are created equal.'" Later, after rambling, Lincoln confessed that he was not prepared to m...


... middle of paper ...


...we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Gettysburg Address Rhetorical Analysis Essay examples - Four and a half months after the Union defeated the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863. He gave the Union soldiers a new perspective on the war and a reason to fight in the Civil War. Before the address, the Civil War was based on states’ rights. Lincoln’s speech has the essence of America and the ideals that were instilled in the Declaration of Independence by the Founders. The sixteenth president of the United States was capable of using his speech to turn a war on states’ rights to a war on slavery and upholding the principles that America was founded upon....   [tags: Gettysburg Address Essay] 893 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Rhetoric of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address - Advertisements on television, newspaper and magazine articles, websites, conversations, speeches, songs—we are bombarded daily with rhetoric vying for our attention. Whether we realize it or not, within these daily situations lie the three proofs of rhetoric: the appeal to emotion, the use of character, and the appeal to reason (pathos, ethos, and logos, respectively). On the other hand, sometimes we can immediately know that a piece of rhetoric contains each of the proofs. One well-known speech that readily incorporates each of them is the address President Abraham Lincoln gave at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863, commonly known as the "Gettysburg Address." In Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,...   [tags: Speech Analysis, The Gettysburg Address 2014]
:: 4 Works Cited
1384 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Gettysburg Address Analysis Essay - Political Speech Analysis Gettysburg Address Analysis Undoubtedly his most famous speech that he gave throughout his presidential years was his Gettysburg Address…… On the first three days of July 1863, the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee, had fought the Army of the Potomac, the principal northern army, to which General George G. Meade had been assigned command only four days earlier. In early May, Lee had won a smashing victory at Chancellorsville, Virginia, over a Union force approximately twice as large, then had boldly determined to carry the war to the enemy by invading Pennsylvania....   [tags: Political Science Politics] 990 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of The Gettysburg Address Essay example - Analysis of The Gettysburg Address In the early days of the United States, loyalty to one’s state often took precedence over loyalty to one’s country. The Union was considered a “voluntary compact entered into by independent, sovereign states” for as long as it served their purpose to be so joined (Encarta). Neither the North nor South had any strong sense permanence of the Union. As patterns of living diverged between North and South, their political ideas also developed marked differences. The North needed a central government to build an infrastructure of roads and railways, protect its complex trading and financial interests and control the national currency....   [tags: Papers] 1433 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Gettysburg - Gettysburg Living in close proximity to Gettysburg, I have spent many weekends of my childhood hiking through the numerous acres of woods on Culp’s Hill, climbing the gigantic boulders in Devil’s Den, and tramping through the marshes of Plum Run. Enjoying the scenic beauty is just the beginning as to what Gettysburg has to offer. However, why is Gettysburg so important to us all as Americans. What made this small town so famous that tens of thousands of tourists from all over the globe come to walk through the many wheat fields in the surrounding countryside....   [tags: History Historical Gettysburg America Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1184 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Battle of Gettysburg Analysis - The battle of Gettysburg occurred over three hot summer days, July 1 to July 3, 1863, around the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It began as a meeting engagement, but by its end involved approximately 170,000 Americans. The battle is considered to be the turning point in the American Civil War and is one of the most studied battles in American history. The events that took place at Gettysburg had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the Civil War and the fate of the United States. It is far easier for us in the present than it was for those at Gettysburg, to look back and determine the path that the leaders should have taken....   [tags: gettysburg, american civil war, batlle analysis]
:: 5 Works Cited
1961 words
(5.6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay about The Meaning of the Gettysburg Address - Essay on the Meaning of the Gettysburg Address While the Gettysburg Address is fairly short in length at around 300 words, this famous speech delivered by President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1963 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania is both enduring and meaningful for all Americans today, almost exactly 146 years later. The first paragraph of his speech sets the tone, in which Lincoln does not directly mention the bloody Battle of Gettysburg, in which 50,000 soldiers lost their lives. Instead, he refers in the opening phrase, “Four score and seven years ago,” to the founding of America through another important written document, the Declaration of Independence in 1776....   [tags: American History] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about The Gettysburg Address and American Revival - The Gettysburg Address is without a doubt one of the most famous speeches in American history. However, at the time, it was simply an uplifting, motivational speech by the sitting president as part of a ceremony dedicating the Gettysburg Battlefield as a National Cemetery. Now, it is viewed as an historic address delivered by one of the greatest presidents and orators to ever live, Abraham Lincoln. It has also become the benchmark for speeches today and is the subject of many articles, talks, and books alike....   [tags: U.S. History ] 1715 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Arguments of the Gettysburg Address Essays - The Gettysburg Address is one of the most famous speeches in American history. The History Place indicates that on November 19, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln went to a battle field positioned in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania where three dreadful days of battle occurred called the Battle of Gettysburg. While he was attending the battle field to dedicate it as a national cemetery, he read his speech to the public. After the main orator, Edward Everett of Massachusetts, delivered his speech that lasted about two hours, it was Lincoln’s turn....   [tags: American History]
:: 3 Works Cited
845 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Meaning Behind The Gettysburg Address Essay - While the Gettysburg Address is short in length at around 300 words, this famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania is still both enduring and meaningful for all Americans today, almost exactly 146 years later. The first paragraph of his speech sets the tone, in which Lincoln does not directly mention the bloody Battle of Gettysburg, in which 50,000 soldiers lost their lives. Instead, he refers in the opening phrase, “Four score and seven years ago,” to the founding of America through another important written document, the Declaration of Independence in 1776....   [tags: American History] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]