Preview
Preview

Chaucer's Views Exposed in The Canterbury Tales Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1070 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Chaucer's Views Exposed in The Canterbury Tales

 
The Canterbury Tales were written and pieced together in the late 1380's, early 1390's.  The author of the book is Geoffrey Chaucer.  When considering the structure of the tales, one can deduce that they were put together using Framework Narrative, a very unique style of writing.  The opening prologue speaks of 29 pilgrims, including Chaucer, who are all on a pilgrimage to Canterbury. All of them are seeking a certain shrine for spiritual cleansing, and relief.  The journey was to be long, but in the end it would all be worth it.  Chaucer's social views and prejudices are revealed through his description of the pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales.

 

    Chaucer presents a very positive picture of the pilgrims in the ruling class.  For example, when describing the personality of the Knight, he refers to him as being honorable, truthful, chivalrous, courteous, brave, and gentle.  Two quotes that stood out when searching for the positive qualities of the Knight were:

 

·   "He was a true and perfect gentle Knight."(Chaucer Pg. 2-Line 15)

·   "He had never yet in all his life spoken discourteously to anybody." (Chaucer Pg. 2-Line 14)

 

Chaucer also builds up the Squire, the Knights son in a similar way.  He says that the squire is remarkably agile, strong, joyful, courteous, helpful, and humble.  Two quotes that were quite noticeable when searching for the positive qualities of the Squire were:

 

·   "His cloak was short, with long, wide sleeves, and he sat his horse well and rode excellently."(Chaucer Pg. 2-Line 30)

·   "He could compose the words and music for songs, joust and also dance, and draw and write very well."(Ch...


... middle of paper ...


...orm them. 

 

 

Works Cited and Consulted:

Brewer, Derek. Tradition and Innovation in Chaucer. London: Macmillan, 1982.

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Canterbury Tales. Pp. 3-328. In the Riverside Chaucer. Larry D. Benson, ed. Boston: Houghton, 1987.

Cooper, Helen. "The Shape-shiftings of the Wife of Bath, 1395-1670." Pp. 168-184. In Chaucer Traditions: Studies in Honour of Derek Brewer. Ruth Morse and Barry Windeatt, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1990.

Delasanta, Rodney. "Nominalism and the 'Clerk's Tale' Revisited." Chaucer Review 31.3 (1997), 209-231.

Hallissy, Margaret. Clean Maids, True Wives, Steadfast Widows: Chaucer's Women and Medieval Codes of Conduct. Connecticut: Greenwood, 1993.

Saul, Nigel. "Chaucer and Gentility." Pp. 41-58. In Chaucer's England. Barbara A. Hanawalt, ed. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1992.

 


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Chaucer's View of Women Exposed in The Canterbury Tales Essay - Often, the most memorable female characters are those who break out of the stereotypical “good wife” mold. When an author uses this technique effectively, the woman often carries the story. In Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, he portrays the Wife of Bath, Alison, as a woman who bucks the tradition of her times with her brashness and desire for control. Chaucer effectively presents a woman's point of view and evokes some sympathy for her. In the author's time, much of the literature was devoted to validating the frailties of women....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer, The Wife of Bath] 788 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Evil Exposed in The Pardoner's Tale - The Root of Evil Exposed in The Pardoner's Tale   "The root of all evil is money."  Because this phrase has been repeated so many times throughout history, one can fail to realize the truth in this timeless statement.  Whether applied to the corrupt clergy of Geoffrey Chaucer's time, selling indulgences, or the corrupt televangelists of today, auctioning off salvation to those who can afford it, this truth never seems to lose its validity.  In Chaucer's famous work The Canterbury Tales, he points out many inherent flaws of human nature, all of which still apply today.  Many things have changed since the fourteenth century, but humanity's ability to act foolish is not...   [tags: Pardoner's Tale]
:: 2 Works Cited
1099 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer Essay example - In the Middle Ages, gender stereotypes of both male and female exist. These stereotypes are especially examined by Chaucer in love stories. Chaucer’s attitudes toward stereotypes of men and women are different—generally, he confirms most of the stereotypes of male while challenging those of female. In the following passage, I would like to discuss how Chaucer interrogates the stereotypes in his tales from the aspects of these two genders. In gender stereotypes of male in the Middle Ages, what men are supposed to be like is mainly based on chivalric values....   [tags: The Canterbury Tales Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2071 words
(5.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Importance of Social Class Exposed in The Canterbury Tales Essay - Social class was the foundation of everyday life during the Middle Ages. Social class played a significant role in the lives of medieval people. The aristocracy class and the immoral lower class were often viewed by society as practically different races. In The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer shows the wide variance among the classes in every aspect of their daily lives. The zeitgeist of the Middle Ages can be seen through his illustration of differences between classes in moral behavior, economic power, the autonomy and education of women during the Middle Ages....   [tags: The Canterbury Tales Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1142 words
(3.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Powerful Satire in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Essay - Powerful Satire in The Canterbury Tales If one theme can be considered overriding or defining throughout Medieval European society, it would most likely be the concept of social class structure. During this early historical period in Europe, most of society was divided into three classes or 'estates:' the workers, the nobles, and the clerics. By Chaucer's time, however, the powerful estate structure had begun to wear down. Weaknesses in the system became apparent, as many people, such as Chaucer himself, seemed to no longer belong to any one of the three estates....   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
3469 words
(9.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Canterbury Tales: The Knight - Canterbury Tales: The Knight In his prologue, Geoffrey Chaucer introduces all of the characters who are involved in this fictional journey and who will tell the tales. One of the more interesting of the characters included in this introductory section is the Knight. Chaucer initially refers to the Knight as "a most distinguished man" and, indeed, his sketch of the Knight is highly complimentary. In this essay, I will contrast Chaucer's ideal Knight with its modern equivalent. The Knight, Chaucer tells us, possessed good horses, "but he was not gaily dressed"....   [tags: Geoffrey Chaucer Canterbury Tales Essays] 692 words
(2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Significance of Women in Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales Essay - The Significance of Women in Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales        In Geoffrey Chaucer's The Cantebury Tales, many stories are told leading to a wide range of topics.  One particular and significant topic Chaucer touches on many times is the role of women.  In stories such as The Millers Tale, The Knight's Tale, and the Wife of Bath's Tale the women of each story are portrayed extremely different.  Alisoun, Emelye, and the wife of Bath, each exemplify three dissimilar ways in which women love.  The way Chaucer describes each of these characters is dependent on the out come of each particular story.  Chaucer is careful with his word choice and figurative language with each woman, enabling t...   [tags: Canterbury Tales Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
3352 words
(9.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about The Spectrum of Marriages in The Canterbury Tales - In The Canterbury Tales Chaucer portrays a wide spectrum of marriage from what can be traditionally seen as the worst to the best. Three of these tales, The Miller's, The Franklin's, and The Wife of Bath's, support this examination of what can constitute an ideal marriage. First in the Miller's tale is exposed what can be interpreted as the worst type of marriage. In this fabliau Chaucer exposes the problems of an older man marrying a younger women and gives the impression that this situation should not be desired in a marriage, “He was jealous and kept her on a short leash, / for she was wild and young, and he was old” (lines 38-39)....   [tags: spectrum of marriage as seen by Chaucer]
:: 1 Works Cited
649 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
William Chaucer and His Views on the Clergy Essay - ... The friars of the time are most commonly accused of committing the sin of greed. Chaucer juxtaposes “One should give silver for a poor Friar’s care”(236) and “He kept his tippet stuffed with pins for curls” (237) to show the Friar is supposed to be poor, but obviously scams plenty of money from the church people to afford gifts for little girls. The friar is also commonly known to be sexually active with many women throughout the town, exemplifying the sin of lust. Chaucer makes note of his lust by saying he is a “wanton one and merry” (212) and then “He lisped a little out of wantonness” (274)....   [tags: Cantebury Tales, cleric corruption] 615 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Canterbury Tales Essay example - Canterbury Tales as a whole was very interesting. It has introduced us to a way of life that we never knew existed. It also introduced us to a type of crude humor that we have never been exposed to. It has shown us a true side of life during the Middle Ages. We have learned many things already from our World History teachers, but to experience it first hand is a different story. To experience the jokes, the merriment, and culture opens the gates to a new world. I think that these tales have been very entertaining, and enriching....   [tags: essays research papers] 596 words
(1.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]