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Sociology question on Marx Essay

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Sociology question on Marx

1. Briefly outline the relationship between, Hegel, Feuerbach and Marx

Hegel who was an idealistic philosopher he developed the theory of
dialectical. Hegel applied the dialectic theory to the history of
human society; he used idealism instead of materialism. Hegel moveable
variables in his dialectic were human ideas and thoughts. He came to a
conclusion that society is essentially an expression of people’s
thoughts. Hegel also claimed that when a conflict occurs between an
idea or thoughts, new ideas or concepts are created and adopted by
society so that improvements can occur and society can progress
forward for the good of everyone.

Feuerbach was a philosophiser who criticised Hegels uses of
philosophical ideas. Feuerbach claimed that ideas didn’t create
reality, but held that reality creates ideas (materialism). Feuerbach
had a floor in his materialism concept his floor was that he saw ideas
as automatically stemming from being a part of society and claimed ‘to
be is to know’, which means Feuerbach claim that ideas come from a
person experience in society.

Karl Marx took aspects of both Feuerbach and Hegel work, and adapted
them to his own way of thinking; because of this Marx work falls into
the centre of the objective and subjective spectrum. Marx took Hegels
subjective dialectic and applied it to the area of class conflict to
the dialectic instead of ideas and thoughts that Hegel applied it to.
Marx adopted Feuerbach theory of materialism, which he claimed society
was created by ideas (‘to be is to know’). Although Marx used these
two-pieces of philosophical theories into his work he added ...


... middle of paper ...


...ole determinate. Marx
argues that lots of various institutions and parts of society work
together for the mutual gain of society and its members, not just the
economic factors. Marx claimed that revolutions can be successful, but
they depend on two factors firstly the main factor is economic
situation; the second factor is human initiative. He stated that
people must make their own reality, which means that if people want to
change anything in society or else where they have to flight for it.
Marx described his economic infrastructure as ‘ultimately determinant
element in history’. Marx friend Engels argued that the economic
infrastructure does uses economic factors for its base, but the
superstructure incorporates the economic factors and applies them to
society to show the affects it has on historical struggle.





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