My Account
Preview
Preview

Essay about The Pros and Cons of Participant Observation

No Works Cited
Length: 493 words (1.4 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Orange      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Advantages and Disadvantages of Participant Observation as a Research Method

This essay will examine how participant observation is used as a
research method. In the main body of this essay, this idea will be
addressed by pointing out advantages and

disadvantages of participant observation. I will give examples to
support my argument.

Participant observation is the main research method favoured by
interpetitivists. It involves the researcher participating in a
social group to observe and experience the

world as a participant while still observing the group for future
analasys of their behaviour from the researchers point of view. The
researcher must decide how he will approach

the group he wishes to join. He may decide to become an 'overt'
participant observer, in which the researcher will join the group as a
participant and does not hide the fact

that he is observing, or he may decide to become a 'covert' particpant
observer, in which he becomes a normal participant in the setting
while conseali...


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Pros and Cons of Participant Observation or Surveys as a Research Method - Introduction In our daily activities as humans, we consciously and unconsciously observe what people do around us, how they do it, and sometimes ask why they do what they do. In so doing we gain a better understanding of their ways of life. Anthropologist and sociologist too mention but a few, professions employ the daily observations we engage in as humans in a methodology called participant observation. Dewalt and Dewalt (2002:1) define participant observation as “a method in which a researcher takes part in the daily activities, events, rituals and interactions, of a group of people as one of the means of learning the explicit and tacit aspects of their life routine and culture.” Partici...   [tags: Social Research Methods]
:: 17 Works Cited
1933 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Participant Observation: Understanding Society Essay - Assess the usefulness of participant observation in sociological research. In this short essay I will give a skilled weighed argument of the usefulness and non-usefulness of a participant observation. I will back up the points made during this piece with sociologists I have studied. After, which I will then reach a conclusion where I will justify the argument in depth. Observation means watching behaviour in real-life settings. A covert participant observation is when the subject(s) you’re studying doesn’t know that you’re actually studying them....   [tags: Participant Observation] 1065 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Participant Observation: Understanding Society - Participant Observation as the Most Effective Method of Understanding Society All case studies require either overt or covert observation to collect the information necessary to complete the study. Both covert and overt have their advantages and disadvantages; they both add different but similar ideas and theories to a study. These two methods have been used in a variety of case studies but the ones that I am going to focus on are James Patrick’s study of Glasgow gang’s, Laud Humphreys study of the tea room trade in America and Ann Oakley’s study of first time pregnancy with women in the UK....   [tags: Participant Observation] 553 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Usefulness of Participant Observation as a Sociological Method Essay - The Usefulness of Participant Observation as a Sociological Method Unlike other research methods participant observation allows the sociologist to look at people in their natural environment. It is often referred to as a naturalistic approach. The research does not artificially interfere with people’s lives and they are free to act as normal. This allows the researcher to gain an insight which surveys cannot produce. This is illustrated by a well-known quote: “As I sat and listened, I learned the answers to questions I would not have the sense to ask if I had been getting my information solely on an interview basis.” By W.F....   [tags: Participant Observation] 610 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about The Pros and Cons of Hosting the Olympics - With over two hundred countries participating, the Olympic Games is easily considered as one of the largest multisport event known to history. The Olympics are held at a different country, and even more rarely at the same city. For a country to be chosen to host the Olympics, the country’s National Olympic Committee (the country’s representatives for the Olympics) nominates a city (from the country they represent) that they think has potential in hosting the Olympics nine years prior to when they wish to host the Olympics....   [tags: olympic games, pros and cons]
:: 15 Works Cited
1040 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Participant Observation Report Essays - The class attended for my Participant Observation Assignment was a yoga class at the Recreation Center at State University. Such a class is for one session and is forty-five minutes in length. During this class, we covered beginning yoga moves at a slow pace so everyone felt comfortable. The nature of the class consisted of simple yoga moves, serine atmosphere, and relaxing music. Learning theories that were address, applied, and by the instructor wanted us to use were Skinner’s Operant Conditioning, Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, and Observational Learning....   [tags: Participant Observation 2014]
:: 2 Works Cited
2100 words
(6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Legalizing Marijuana: Pros and Cons Essay - The war on drugs is a movement of prohibition and military aid being undertaken by the United States government intended to both define and reduce the illegal drug trade. In the year 2010 the U.S. government spent $15 billion on the war on drugs, at a rate of $500 per second. State and local governments spent another $25 billion as well. In 2007, $42 billion was spent on the marijuana prohibition. That is more money than the war on drugs spent on all types of drugs three years before when $40 billion was spent all together....   [tags: Drugs, Pros and Cons]
:: 2 Works Cited
1595 words
(4.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Pros and Cons of Taking a Year Off Before College Essay - It’s your senior year of high school. It is time for you to decide what you want to do after you graduate. You have a few possible things that you could do. You could start applying for colleges, get accepted to one, and then go to college right out of high school; or you could do the same thing, but take a year off. This brings up the argument of whether or not a student should take off a gap year before they begin college. There are both, pros and cons to taking a gap year prior to starting college....   [tags: Pros and Cons of Gap Year]
:: 3 Works Cited
1096 words
(3.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Participant Observation Essay - Participant Observation Participant Observation is the study of a culture or society usually carried out by living for an extended period of time with its members. The participant-observer takes part in everyday life and carefully records such things as behaviour, events and conversations, in order to obtain a fully rounded picture of beliefs, social groupings and customs. There are two different forms of Participant Observation: Overt observation is when the subjects are aware they are being observed and allow the observer in to their lives, this is often the most criticised form due to bias, Covert observation is when the subjects are not aware they are being ob...   [tags: participant-observer] 490 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Participant Observation in Anthropology Essay - Participant observation is a method of collecting information and data about a culture and is carried out by the researcher immersing themselves in the culture they observing. The researcher becomes known in the community, getting to know and understand the culture in a more intimate and detailed way than would be possible from any other approach. This is done by observing and participating in the community’s daily activities. The method is so effective because the researcher is able to directly approach the people in the community in a natural context as opposed to taking the participant out of their environment....   [tags: Anthropology Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1760 words
(5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]