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The Role of Nelson Mandela in Ending Apartheid in South Africa Essay

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Nelson Mandela’s role in bringing Apartheid to an end was very
important, however, there were many other factors that contributed to
the ending of Apartheid.

The African National Congress, also known as the ANC, was a major
factor in ending Apartheid. Even when the ANC became illegal in South
Africa it moved to continue its work against Apartheid. In 1940 Dr.
A. B. Xuma became president of the ANC; he rescued a struggling
organisation. In 1944 he reorganised it, out its finances onto a
secure footing and attracted some able, young, new members who formed
the ANC’s Youth League. These new members consisted of of Nelson
Mandela, Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo who all greatly helped bring
Apartheid to an end. By 1848, thanks to the Youth League, the ANC was
ready to give more effective leadership to black resistance than ever
before.

Other black organisations such as the PAC, UDF and COSATU also
contributed to bringing Apartheid to an end. However, these
organisations were not as influential as the ANC of which Mandela was
a member.

There were many individuals who helped to end Apartheid in South
Africa. Together these individuals were extremely important, although
individually Nelson Mandela probably made the most progress. Winnie
Mandela, Mandela’s wife, fought for her husbands release from prison.
She came to symbolise defiance to white rule but in 1989 she was
implicated in the death of a Soweto boy and lost some of her
influence. Archbishop Desmond Tutu spoke out against injustice all
his life. He became an Anglican priest in 1961. In 1984 he won the
Nobel Peace Prize for work against Apartheid. F. W....


... middle of paper ...


... South Africa’s white
government.

Nelson Mandela contributed largely to the ANC; he was a main
individual in the struggle against Apartheid and devoted his life to
fighting for his beliefs. However, I do not believe that Mandela was
the most important factor in ending Apartheid. I think that the mass
protests were extremely important in ending Apartheid and I feel they
were more so than Mandela. Another factor I believe to have been more
influential than Nelson Mandela was the trading boycotts because
without South Africa’s trade market money would become a problem.
Mandela was, though, probably more important than pressure from white
liberals in South Africa and neighbouring states. On the whole
Mandela’s work largely contributed to the end of Apartheid yet I do
not believe he was the most important factor.


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