Preview
Preview

Essay on American Sign Language

:: 3 Works Cited
Length: 1668 words (4.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

American Sign Language

In learning about the deaf culture I have taken on a new understanding about the people it includes. Through readings and the lessons, I have learned that being deaf has both its hardships and its blessings. The beauty of the language alone makes one want to learn all that he or she can about it. In this paper I will discuss the beauty of the language and the misconceptions the hearing world has about deafness.
The deaf culture has often been labeled as the deaf- and- dumb culture. This is not only an insulting term it is also very inaccurate. Deaf people are just as intelligent as hearing people. In the early 1800's when ASL was first brought about in the United States Being deaf was considered shameful and defective. The first school for the deaf was called "The American Asylum for the instruction of the Deaf and Dumb" ; in those days this was an acceptable term to use. There are many other terms that are unacceptable to the deaf, such as : deaf-mute, mute, hearing handicapped, disabled, dummie etc.. Even in today's day and age some people still use these terms. Another common assumption of the hearing is that all deaf people can or should read lips, this is not so- lip reading is very difficult to master. Verbalization is also expected from the deaf by the hearing, this is also very difficult for the deaf because most deaf people have never heard their own voice and cannot know if their intonation, pitch and volume are used correctly. Another misconception about the deaf is that different from the hearing, most hearing people mean well, but speak to the deaf as if they are mentally challenged, this is why a deaf person may walk away or give a disapproving look.
The hearing world often...


... middle of paper ...


... people have just followed along generation after generation.
I also feel that ASL is a beautiful language and should be given as a choice in language requirements in all grade levels. This language that was brought to us over 150 years ago could sustain and still be useful today for within our own country unlike Italian, French or German. It has some kind of magic that makes us want to learn and speak it when we do not have to. The fluent and rhythmic motions are mesmerizing and captivating and anyone with the means to learn it should.


Bibliography:
Bahan, Ben. Hoffmeister, Robert. Lane, Harlan. A Journey into the Deaf World. USA: Dawn Sign Press.

Humphries, Tom. Padden, Carol. Deaf in America (Voices from a Culture). Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Levitan, Linda. Moore, Matthew.S. For Hearing People Only. New York: Deaf Life Press.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay about Uses of Fingerspelling and American Sign Language - American Sign Language is the visual language that has been created by the deaf in this country. For those with a limited knowledge of deaf culture or American Sign Language (ASL), fingerspelling may be a foreign concept. Fingerspelling is the act of using the manual alphabet of ASL to spell a word or phrase. All fingerspelling is done with the dominant hand, as are one-handed signs, and is ideally done in the area between the shoulder and the chin on the same side as the dominant hand. This skill serves many purposes and functions in ASL conversation....   [tags: sign language, deaf, fingerspelling] 1225 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Native American Sign Language - Native American Sign Language Very basic, elementary and logical characteristics made the Native American Sign Language the world's most easily learned language. It was America's first and only universal language. The necessity for intercommunication between Indian tribes having different vocal speech developed gesture speech or sign language (Clark; pg. 11). Although there is no record or era dating the use of sign language, American Indian people have communicated with Indian Sign Language for thousands of years....   [tags: Native Americans Sign Language Communication] 1455 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
American Sign Language Essay - Sign language has played an important part throughout history; it has removed the barrier between those who can hear and those who are deaf. Sign language is a form of communication that does not rely on verbal speech. It uses visual-spatial medium to express communication (Stewart & Akamatsu, 236). Hands, fingers, body, and facial features are used to visually transmit linguistic information. The signs are formed by hands, which convey symbols that are similar to spoken words and phrases. These facial and body movements serve as articulations and modifiers of speech....   [tags: communication for the hearing impaired]
:: 4 Works Cited
1606 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
American Sign Language: God's Noblest Gift Essay - “Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things” (American). For centuries, people from all walks of life have been using their hands to communicate with one another, and for centuries people from all walks of life have been learning. Today I am following in their footsteps with a passion from God for the deaf language, culture, and souls. For almost a decade, an intense ardor for American Sign Language and a desire to reach its native users for Christ seeded itself in my soul, wove its roots deeper and deeper, and blossomed into one of the greatest loves of my life....   [tags: culture, deaf, communication, manual alphabet]
:: 13 Works Cited
2326 words
(6.6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay on American Sign Language - American Sign Language In learning about the deaf culture I have taken on a new understanding about the people it includes. Through readings and the lessons, I have learned that being deaf has both its hardships and its blessings. The beauty of the language alone makes one want to learn all that he or she can about it. In this paper I will discuss the beauty of the language and the misconceptions the hearing world has about deafness. The deaf culture has often been labeled as the deaf- and- dumb culture....   [tags: Deaf Culture ASL Papers]
:: 3 Works Cited
1668 words
(4.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Deaf Movement at Gallaudet University: Deaf President Now Essay - ... "Deaf Awareness," "Deaf Power," and "Deaf Pride" were now slogans often emblazoned on the shirts of the students at Gallaudet. Before this surge, deaf education in American schools, for well over 200 years, had gone by the hearing world's dogma: oral communication, based on print-centered literacy, had always been strongly insisted upon, and manual, visual communication discouraged (if it was allowed at all). The reasoning was that if deaf people were to function and communicate, they must do so as if they can hear; if they can't get along in the hearing world, they can't get along at all, and knowing the dominant (hearing) culture's language, doing well with its literacy, is the key to...   [tags: american sign language, social grammar] 1335 words
(3.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Challenge of a Computer Representation of Sign Language: Capturing a “Visual-Spatial” Language Electronically - The Challenge of a Computer Representation of Sign Language: Capturing a “Visual-Spatial” Language Electronically Signed languages are not simply another means of communicating a spoken language. Individual signed languages are linguistically unique forms of communication, with their own grammatical constructs, word order, sensibility, and rules. American Sign Language, used in the United States and parts of Canada, is not the same as English. (Fox 2002). Like many people who share common beliefs, customs, and behavior, the Deaf community has developed a coherent culture....   [tags: Language ]
:: 13 Works Cited
1349 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Difference Between Univeralism and Relativism with Sign Language Essay - In our discussion of cochlear implants that, in my mind, seemed at times distastefully eugenicist, I found myself grappling with some difficult questions: How different would my experience of the world be if I communicated via American Sign Language instead of English. Does the existence of sign language benefit the world in some meaningful way. Just what, if anything, would be lost if the world lost sign language. In trying to answer these questions, I am reminded of an aphorism my brother once shared with me that I've never forgotten: "There are two types of narcissism," he told me, "That of assuming one's experiences to be unique, and that of assuming one's experiences to be universal."...   [tags: language, linguistic, experience] 678 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sign Language in Classrooms Essays - On a cold winter evening, the sound of a siren comes blaring from a distance that is only a couple of feet away. Sixteen year-old Daniel is bent over working on fixing something under the hood of his car. All of a sudden, he feels a rough grab on his side. He looks up confused, but is met by a raging police office trying to communicate something while yelling. When the police officer doesn’t get the reaction he expects, he then begins to forcefully handcuff Daniel. Unbeknownst to the police office, Daniel couldn’t respond because he couldn’t hear the police officer because he was Deaf....   [tags: Education, special education]
:: 7 Works Cited
1992 words
(5.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Gesture as a Mediating Factor in Speech and Sign Language Storytelling - Gesture as a Mediating Factor in Speech and Sign Language Storytelling There are many hearing individuals who do not know sign language but move their hands when speaking. Chances are these people would have a hard time telling the same story if asked not to use their hands. Additionally, the story told without the assistance of gesture would likely seem lackluster by comparison. The question becomes, to what degree is gesture an integral part of effective storytelling and how much does it add to the complexity and richness of a story....   [tags: Language Education Teaching] 5050 words
(14.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]