Preview
Preview

Importance of Control in Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 725 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



Importance of Control in Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark

 

In William Stafford's "Traveling Through the Dark," the narrator encounters a dead deer on the edge of the road. He knows that the safe and proper course of action is to push the deer into the canyon, but when he finds that the doe was near giving birth before she died, he hesitates to kill the unborn fawn. Stafford's central idea in the poem revolves around the decision the narrator makes to sacrifice the deer in order to clear the road of obstacles, so that others who drive on the dark, narrow road won't have to swerve.

 

The image of the deer evokes sympathy and compassion from the reader because the image isn't merely that of a dead animal. The second stanza describes the dead deer as the reader would expect. The narrator "stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing; / she had stiffened already, almost cold." The lifeless deer, merely a heap of animal recently killed on the road, seems ready to be pushed into the canyon, but the next stanza reverses the image of the deer. The narrator approaches ...


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
“Dark Film” and Sunset Blvd. Essay - Film noir, by translation alone, means dark film, and by that measurement Sunset Boulevard certainly fits the genre. A gloomy story that follows a jaded and sarcastic protagonist, Joe Gillis from his initial dire circumstances to his untimely death, Sunset Blvd. earns the description “dark” several times over. But there is more to film noir than crushingly depressing plotlines. There are common motifs and icons that are found in most film noirs, such as crime, dark alleys, guns and alcohol. Deeper than this, film noir features certain visual elements, character archetypes, and themes that create a unique style of film....   [tags: Film] 1076 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Light and Dark Forces in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - The Light and Dark Forces in Heart of Darkness        Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad, explores something truer and more fundamental than a mere personal narrative. It is a night journey into the unconscious and a confrontation within the self. Certain circumstances of Marlow's voyage, when looked at in these terms, have new importance. Marlow insists on the dreamlike quality of his narrative. "It seems to me I am trying to tell you a dream - making a vain attempt, because no relation of a dream can convey the dream - sensation." Even before leaving Brussels, Marlow felt as though he "was about to set off for center of the earth," not the center of a continent....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1681 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Giver: The Importance of Individuality - ... Most of the significant characters and events that occur in this novel have at least a bit of symbolism. The text on the page in this novel is solely a cover for the true symbolism that hides beneath the surface. In this novel, foreshadowing is a crucial literary element that Lois Lowry uses to give the reader hints about what is going to happen later on in the book. Foreshadowing gives the reader an idea of the main character's personality, introduces the conflicts that are yet to happen, and discreetly proposes the main theme: the importance of being an individual....   [tags: society, symbolism, foreshadowing]
:: 4 Works Cited
838 words
(2.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Native American Experience: Through The Eyes of Poetry - Code “What I’m about to tell you, Corporal, cannot leave this room. Under no circumstances can you allow your code talker to fall into enemy hands. Your mission is to protect the code… at all cost.” In the movie, Windtalkers, this is how a commander wants his marine to treat the paired Navajo code talker. That is, if it’s necessary, his marine could kill the Navajo, just like abandoning one of his properties. Even in the mid 1900s, the Native Americans were still treated not as human beings, but rather, machines; therefore, it is not hard for us to imagine how even more frightening the Native Americans’ circumstances were in the early days when they were first colonized by the western sett...   [tags: Native Americans Literature] 1864 words
(5.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Importance of Plants on Planet Earth Essay - The Importance of Plants on Planet Earth Plants As We See Them --------------------- Plants are all around us, renowned for their aesthetic appeal; their colours and structures lend themselves to decoration. Plants are used in celebrations and commiseration's and are often celebrated in their own right- the annual Michigan potato festival being a good example. Plants are associated with national identity. The Scottish thistle; Irish Shamrock; Welsh leeks and daffodils. Many national flags feature plants, the Cedar tree on the Lebanese flag, and the Maple leaf on the Canadian flag....   [tags: Papers] 820 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on the Importance of Language in The Tempest - The Importance of Language in The Tempest      In discussing Derrida's view of Western literature, Geoffrey Hartman writes that "Western tradition has been marked . . . by a metaphysics of light, by the violence of light itself, from Apollonian cults to Cartesian philosophies. In the light of this emphatic light everything else appears obscure; especially the Hebraic development of aniconic writing and self-effacing commentary of textuality" (xix). This point is well illustrated by the nature of Prospero's power in The Tempest for his control of natural and supernatural forces is achieved through book-learning the bringing to life of Logos....   [tags: Tempest essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1312 words
(3.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Traveling Through the Dark by William Stafford - Traveling Through the Dark by William Stafford In his poem, "Traveling Through the Dark," William Stafford presents the reader with the difficulty of one man's choice. Immediately, the scene is set, with the driver, who is "traveling though the dark" (line 1) coming upon a recently killed deer. At first, his decision with what to do with the deer is easy; he knows he must push it off the edge for the safety of other motorists, but then, a closer examination of the deer reveals to the man new circumstances....   [tags: Papers William Stafford Through Dark Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1097 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Atrocities in Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark Essay - Atrocities in Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark Is a drive just a drive, or is it a metaphor that imparts appreciation for life's fragility while simultaneously lamenting man's inability to appropriately confront, or understand, death. William Stafford's "Traveling Through the Dark" illustrates the mechanisms by which seemingly mundane events become probes into the mystery and ambiguity of the human condition. The poem's situation is simple, a lone traveler driving along a desolate canyon road spots a felled deer; the traveler, desiring neither to hit the deer, nor by swerving to avoid it, hurtle his car over the canyon precipice, stops his vehicle and proceeds to push the falle...   [tags: Traveling Through Dark] 791 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
William Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark Essay - Profound Meaning in William Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark The power of the poet is not only to convey an everyday scene into a literary portrait of words, but also to interweave this scene into an underlying theme. The only tool the poet has to wield is the word. Through a careful placement and selection of words, the poet can hopefully make his point clear, but not blatantly obvious. Common themes of poems are life, death, or the conflicting forces thereto. This theme could never possibly be overused because of the endless and limitless ways of portraying life or death through the use of different words....   [tags: Stafford Traveling Through the Dark Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1187 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Importance of the Role of Egdon Heath in Return of the Native - Discuss the importance of the role of Egdon Heath in Return of the Native. Do you think that Egdon is a sinister or benign influence. The entire opening chapter of The Return of the Native is devoted to a lengthy description of Egdon Heath, the setting of the novel. The heath must be significant in terms of the themes and the continue progress of the novel. The author of the novel, Thomas Hardy, made the heath so significant to the point that it can be look upon as a character like any other in the novel....   [tags: English Literature] 1651 words
(4.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]