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Martin Luther King: A Powerful Force for Civil Rights Essay

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Do you agree that Martin Luther King was the most important factor in the helping blacks gain more Civil Rights in the 1960's?

In the 1950s and 60s blacks were considered as second-class citizens
of the US, this was evident as they were totally ignored by the rest
of America. Even though slavery was abolished years before but many
Southern white Americans had not blacked out the thought. The
Americans themselves had just come out of a very deadly war, which was
fought to defeat racially prejudiced leaders such as Hitler who
believed in a superior race; but still in America the cause they
fought for was still lurking in their homeland. Blacks had also fought
in the war and felt content that when they return home life would
change for the better, but that wasn't quite the case when they
returned.

The minds of whites had not changed even after the fact that blacks
had contributed to the war as well as the whites and, this feeling was
transparently displayed by the whites situated in southern states;
apart from having very menial jobs, segregation had also become a big
part of their existence. Whites had separate restaurants, waiting
rooms, laundrettes and drinking fountains. The subject that
highlighted segregation was the case of Southern schools being
segregated, which caused the blacks to be deprived of their equal
educational rights; giving the whites a better chance of succeeding in
society. This was looked at as a vital issue, as with no education the
path would seem very short for black children who where supposed to be
the future of America.

The national Association for the Advancement of Coloured People
(NAACP) picked up...


... middle of paper ...


...lping blacks gain more Civil Rights in the 1960's?

I agree to the question above as King's influence and aptitude gave
blacks the rights they retain today, without the determination and
desperation of this one man things would have changed as time slowly
passed, or maybe never changed. King could be considered to have
changed the face of America. King also proved to learn from little
mistakes and bring about great change, he shrewdly used the media to
gain stronger supporters as the treatment of blacks were portrayed for
viewers. Although King knew that his enemies grew by the minute he
still stood strong for his black people, and kept a cool head. His
speech's such as the one in Washington, he seemed to attack the
conscience of white citizens and kept up the theme of `ideal America`,
could be compared to patriotism.


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