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A Critical Analysis of Wind By Ted Hughes Essay

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A Critical Analysis of Wind By Ted Hughes


Hughes's opening line is sculpted in such a way that it gives the
reader an abundance of sensations. The poet achieves amazing
efficiency in the line "far out at sea all night" in that the reader
is exposed to distance, time and environment. The metaphor of the
house being "out at sea" projects the image of a boat "far out"
feeling totally isolated. The house faces wave upon wave of
inexhaustible pounding from the wind as a boat would from an enraged
sea. The time scale of "all night" could literally mean all night or
it may refer to the perception that the wind is so acutely intense
that it feels prolonged. The words "crashing", "booming" and
"stampeding elevate the wind to one of biblical proportions which
sounds like an orchestra thumping out a killer crescendo. The line
"stampeding the fields" accentuate the brutality of the wind attacking
the natural surroundings. In keeping with the oceanic metaphor the
house "floundering" evokes a sense futility. The alliteration in
"black" and "blinding" impose emphasis upon the words and a heightened
sense of awareness in the reader.

The second stanza is a witness to the winds legacy. The magnitude of
the winds power is illustrated with "the hills had new places". The
ultimate measure of the winds potency is that its changed the
environment which we would normally imagine reassuringly permanent.
The personification in the "wind wielded blade-light" makes the wind
dangerous and randomly spiteful. I think the " black and emerald,
flexing like the lens of a mad eye" refers back to the sea metaphor in
the first stanza. A stormy sky like a stormy ...


... middle of paper ...


...e
last two lines of the poem Hughes writes the "window tremble to come
in" and "stones cry out". The personification in "tremble" and "cry"
show that even inanimate objects are displaying signs of fear and
distress.

The theme for the poem is ultimate respect for nature's weapons and
total humility for anything caught in the conflict. In some instances
respect turns to terror as if hiding from an omnipotent tyrant. The
structure of the poem is consistent throughout with six stanzas of
equal length. Hughes uses a lot of alliteration to break up the
reading fluency to reflect the choppy subject of the poem. Hughes's
use of metaphor skilfully illustrate the scale and nature of the wind
whilst drawing attention to the way the wind exploits the delicacy of
the surroundings we usually consider so dependably solid.





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