Preview
Preview

Essay about The Paradox of A Clockwork Orange

:: 7 Works Cited
Length: 2013 words (5.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


 
     The grace of evil in A Clockwork Orange is a recurring paradox throughout the novel and also implies a deep religious connotation. The main foci are the several aspects of evil, violence, and sexual acts committed by Alex and his gang members. However, Anthony Burgess has cleverly incorporated similar paradoxes to that of grace and evil, along with a different dialect to aid in masking the true harshness that lies underneath the violence. The other paradoxes include the extremes of night and day, good and bad, and black and white.

The depiction of evil as being graceful is relevant to the actual title, but also reflects the actions, dialect, and events in the main character Alex's life. Appearance can be deceiving because Alex seems quite graceful, intelligent and well spoken. However, evil thoughts lurk within, which drive him, as a leader of his gang, to commit murders and rapes. As he and his fellow "droogs" speak in a sophisticated Shakespearean-type of language, they describe their evil acts with elegance. As violent and aggressive Alex is perceived to be, he enjoys listening to classical music, especially Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. However, while engulfed in eloquent, graceful, and peaceful music, his mind ponders evil, violent, and sexual fantasies. By the end of the novel, Alex is no longer able to listen to the Ninth Symphony due to the conditioning that was performed on him. He no longer has the freedom to choose and act of his own will. This theme also relates to the grace of evil because even though conditioning someone to be a moral person may seem like a good deed, it is in reality immoral. It is in essence taking away a person's freedom of choice. Religiously, Grace is a gift from God. Even those th...


... middle of paper ...


...g seems freedom of choice is more important. God's Grace prevails over evil and is accepting and forgiving of Alex's sinful actions. Without freedom of choice, one becomes a "clockwork orange," an unnatural and inhuman being. 

 

Works Cited

Burgess, Anthony.  A Clockwork Orange.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1986.

Coale, Samuel, Anthony Burgess.  New York:  Twayne Publishers, 1981.

Connelly, Wayne.  Critical Essays on Anthony Burgess. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1980.

Edelheit, Geoffrey, Ed. Critical Essays on Anthony Burgess. Boston: G.K. Hall and Co. 1986.

Rabinovitz, Rubin: Ethical Values in Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange, in: Studies in the Novel, 11 (1979)

Stinson, John J. Anthony Burgess Revisited. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991.

Stinson, John J.  Anthony Burgess: Novelist on the Margin.  Riley 4: 82-83.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on Free Will in Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange - Free Will versus Predestination in A Clockwork Orange Burgess raises the oppositions of free will and predestination in various of his novel, A Clockwork Orange. The author describes his own faith as alternating between residues of Pelagianism and Augustinianism. Pelagianism denies that God has predestined, or pre-ordained, or planned, our lives. A consequence of this is that salvation is effectively within human power (as God hasn't set it down for each of us, it's within our control), which eventually leads to a denial of original sin....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange Essays] 785 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Social Institutions and Manipulation Exposed in A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess - As teenagers deviate from the constraining grasp of their parents, they begin to establish their own identity through decisions; however, their development of self-identification is frequently hindered by manipulation of societal institutions such as: justice system, religion, and media. Anthony Burgess, author of A Clockwork Orange, establishes the idea of freewill and how it is suppressed when Alex, the main protagonist, undergoes the manipulative Ludovico's technique, religious lectures, and social norms influenced by media- used to instill pain when Alex's desires violence/music and finding salvation, which is similar to the treatment of criminals in our society; ultimately utilized t...   [tags: justice system, religion, media, freewill]
:: 5 Works Cited
1041 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Anthony Burgess and A Clockwork Orange Essay - Imagine existing in a world run by sadistic and insane street gangs who reek havoc on innocent civilians, and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it. Anthony Burgess created this world through his novel, A Clockwork Orange. Anthony Burgess was born in 1917 and died in 1963. A lot of social changes occurred during this period of time, such as: the roaring twenties, prohibition, the Great Depression, World War II, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and many more. Burgess not only lived through those changes, but also helped influences some social changes in literature and music....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange]
:: 6 Works Cited
978 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of A Clockwork Orange Essay example - Analysis and Interpretation of A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, is one of the most experimental, original, and controversial novels of the twentieth century. It is both a compelling work of literature and an in-depth study in linguistics. The novel is a satirical, frightening science fiction piece, not unlike others of this century such as George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four or Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. However, the conflicts and resolutions in A Clockwork Orange are more philosophical than social, and its message is far more urgent....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange]
:: 6 Works Cited
2417 words
(6.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
A Clockwork Orange Essay: Blindness in A Clockwork Orange - Blindness in A Clockwork Orange In the novel, A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess has tried to show the importance of individual freedom over doing the right thing. He has taken an extreme example of violence and perverse acts to accent his strong belief. It is my opinion that Burgess has been blinded to some essential truths in his quest to ensure personal freedom. Personal freedom can be described as acting upon your own accord and not becoming restricted by the social paradigm in which you live....   [tags: Clockwork Orange Essays] 971 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Clockwork Orange Essay - A Clockwork Orange We are first introduced to Alex (Malcolm McDowell) in the company of his posse, strangely sipping drugged milk in a freakish bar with anatomically indiscrete manikins serving as tittie-taps and tables. The ensuing scenes flash from Alex and his three droogs brutally beating an old man to a violent rape scene to a semi-chaotic gang-brawl. The story is of Alex and his love of the old ultra-violence, his act of murder, his betrayal and imprisonment, and his cure (twice). Adapted from Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel, A Clockwork Orange is in part a response to psychological behaviorism and the age of classical conditioning....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange Essays] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
A Clockwork Orange Essay - Clockwork Orange There have been many books published solely on philosophy, and many more than that solely written about human nature, but very infrequently will a book be published that weaves these fields together as well as A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess. In this Book Burgess speculated on the fact “the significance of maturing by choice is to gain moral values and freedoms.” He achieved this task by pushing his angsty teenaged character, Alex, through situations that challenge the moral values of himself and his friends....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange Essays] 1694 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
A Clockwork Orange Essay - Sitting in the Korova milk bar, the four droogs prepare for their evening on the town. The dimly lit bar, which served milk spiked with the drug of your choice, was host to the strange and bizarre of London's criminal subculture. The four outlandish gang members shared a booth, scanning the milkbar, vultures looking for the latest in decayed cuisine. They wore what they deemed "the height of fashion", black tights, lapel-less waistcoats, and derbies with the mandatory cane accompaniment....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange Essays] 785 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Need for Brutality in A Clockwork Orange Essay -     Burgess' A Clockwork Orange, a critically acclaimed masterstroke on the horrors of conditioning, is unfairly attacked for apparently gratuitous violence while it merely uses brutality, as well as linguistics and a contentious dénouement, as a vehicle for deeper themes. Although attacks on A Clockwork Orange are often unwarranted, it is fatuous to defend the novel as nonviolent; in lurid content, its opening chapters are trumped only by wanton killfests like Natural Born Killers. Burgess' Ted Bundy, a teenage Lucifer named Alex, is a far cry from the typical, spray paint-wielding juvenile delinquent....   [tags: A Clockwork Orange Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
4660 words
(13.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on the Language of A Clockwork Orange - The Language of A Clockwork Orange “Gooly into a world where by nochy prestoopniks rule and oobivat and by day all is well.” This is the nature of A Clockwork Orange, a novel by Anthony Burgess, where one enters the world of a fifteen-year-old named Alex who speaks a vernacular language and does what he likes. This molody nadsat, or young teen, leads a life where crime is real horrorshow as he dodges millicents, or policemen, in order to live a life he wants in the merzky, grazzy city where he resides....   [tags: Clockwork Orange Essays] 832 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]