Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Character of the Parson Essay

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The Character of the Parson of Canterbury Tales

   Geoffrey Chaucer is considered by many critics as the father of English literature.  His literary masterpiece was "The Canterbury Tales."  In these tales, Chaucer writes about pilgrims who are on a journey to Canterbury.  Each pilgrim has a tale that they tell on this journey.  Chaucer expresses themes and messages through the characterization of each pilgrim.  Through the Parson, one of the pilgrims, Chaucer is able to portray the life of a true Christian through the general prologue, prologue to the Parson's tale, and the Parson's tale itself.


    In the general prologue, Chaucer introduces the reader to the Parson.  He is a "holy-minded man of good renown" (475).  The reader soon gets to know him as a devout, educated, altruistic, caring, gentle, humble, giving, and brotherly man through the general descriptions of who the Parson is and what he does.  The parson is "benign" and "diligent" (481) as well as being "holy and virtuous" (511).  Chaucer portrays this pious Christian through his reverent and venerable t...

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