My Account
Preview
Preview

The Goals of the Declaration of Independence Essay

:: 4 Works Cited
Length: 1059 words (3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Orange      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Goals of the Declaration of Independence

The American Revolution was not only a battle between the British and the colonists; it was a historical movement that brought about new ways of thinking. The ideas of liberty and equality began to be seen as essential to the growth of the new nation. The separation of the American colonies from the British Empire occurred for a number of reasons. These reasons are illustrated in the Declaration of Independence. Although Thomas Jefferson wrote the document, it expressed the desire of the heart of each colonist to be free of British rule. British rule over the colonies became unbearable in the early months of 1776, making it clear to the colonists that it was time to either give in to British power or declare their independence. This idea of independence divided the colonies, but it was not long before a revolutionary committee met in Philadelphia and drew up the document that would change American history.

The Declaration of Independence was written to separate the American colonies from Britain, but there were many underlying goals. It was written to state the grievances that the colonists held against the British, particularly the king. The colonists wanted a better economy, a new republican government, but perhaps most of all, they simply wanted their misery to end. This is what they set out to explain in the document. John Adams described it as “a Declaration setting forth the causes which have impelled us to this mighty revolution, and the reasons which will justify it in the sight of God and man” (Friedenwald 182).

The forceful wording used in the introduction of the document was used for a reason. Jefferson writes, “When in the course of h...


... middle of paper ...


... clear that government is subject to the people that it governs. The British realized that they could not write a document that would meet the demands of the colonists (Thomas 334). It was time for the colonists to write their own document. This document, the Declaration of Independence, was not only a stand against Britain; it was a stand for freedom.

Works Cited

Friedenwald, Herbert. The Declaration of Independence: An Interpretation and an Analysis. New York: Da Capo Press, 1974.

Pleasants, Samuel A., III. The Declaration of Independence. Columbus, Ohio: Charles E. Merrill Books, 1996.

Thomas, Peter D. G. Tea Party of Independence: The Third Phase of the American Revolution 1773-1776. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991.

Wills, Garry. Inventing America: Jefferson's Declaration of Independence. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Co., 1978.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions - In the declaration of sentiments and resolutions, Elizabeth Cady Stanton states that "The history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpation on the part of men toward women, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her" (205). Gender inequality is a well known issue that has existed in all countries around the world. For instance, in the past, women did not have the right to seek education and occupation, to take part in public and economic events, or to own property....   [tags: Gender Roles, Housekeeping, Freedom] 2406 words
(6.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Millennium Development Goals - The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), established at the 2000 Geneva Conference are to be achieved within 601 days at the time of submission, if the world is to meet the target date of 2015. The progress of the MDGs has been measured and compared within various studies, and although there is still a long way to go, this UN incentive has encouraged positive action within developing countries to break the poverty cycle (Permanyer, 2011). In particular, the progress of the targets and indicators of Goal 1, as implemented in the country of Bangladesh, will be discussed to methodologically explore the success of this initiative in achieving higher quality of life....   [tags: geneva conference, population, poverty reduction]
:: 3 Works Cited
1328 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
History of The Declaration of Independence Essay - The four main parts of the Declaration of Independence are: the Preamble, the Declaration of Natural Rights, List of Grievances, and Resolution of independence by the united States. The purpose of the Preamble was to kindly state that nature itself calls for separation of people from their country, and that in many times through out history, ties will be broken, and new ones shall be formed. The purpose of the Declaration of Natural Rights is to explain that people have certain inalienable rights which governments should protect....   [tags: The Declaration of Independence] 894 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Angola Millennium Goals Report 2010 Essay - CONTENT 1. Abstract………………………………………………………………………………...…3 2. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….4 3. 2.a. United Nations - Millennium Development Goals Project.......................................4 4. 2.b. Angola …………………………………….……………………….………………4 5. The first goal ……………………………………………………………………………..5 6. 3.a What is the goal . ……………...…………………………………….…………….5 7. 3.b. Angola`s targets ……………………………………………………….………….5 8. 3.c.Angola`s challenges ………………………………………...…………….……….5 9. 3.d....   [tags: Goal Analysis]
:: 8 Works Cited
1771 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on It’s Time to Put The Independence Back In Independence Day - It’s Time to Put The Independence Back In Independence Day “Jefferson and Washington fought a war for the principle of independence, meaning the moral right of an individual to live his own life as he sees fit.” - Michael S. Berliner Every Fourth of July America's cities and towns fill with parades and fireworks, celebrating the Fourth of July, the birthday of America. But one hopes that--on the next Independence Day--the speeches will contain fewer bromides and more attention to exactly what is being celebrated....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays] 807 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of The Declaration of Independence Essay - What is the Declaration of Independence. The declaration of independence states that all individuals have inalienable rights, requiring life, liberty, and property, a document by which the thirteen colonies proclaimed their independence from Great Britain. If these rights are not protected, people have the right to abolish the government and institute a new one that is willing to secure those rights and their happiness. The declaration was written by Jefferson when he had the vision that America should be liberal....   [tags: the declaration, thomas jefferson, independence] 1241 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Letter from a Birmingham Jail and The Declaration of Individualism - Letter from a Birmingham Jail and The Declaration of Individualism Although the time periods and goals may be different the method for bringing about change is usually the same, this method is protest. This method is supported by two different people, in two different time periods, with two different goals; these two people are Thomas Jefferson and Martin Luther King Junior. Martin Luther King Junior's letter from a Birmingham Jail was an expression of his encouragement for protest against tradition and established laws and a justification for his actions....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail] 849 words
(2.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The American Declaration of Independence Essay - On May 10 of 1775 the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia, one month after American s begain fighting with the British. There, delegates from each of the 13 colonies would decide on independence. A Declaration of Independence was required to state why the 13 colonies were separating from the British Empire. With this, POW's could demand to be treated as prisoners instead of traitors and aid coul d be sought from Britain's enemies. The Declaration of Independence consisted of the preamble, the middle section and a section declaring independence....   [tags: Declaration of Independence] 417 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Argument Analysis - Declaration of Independence Essays - Argument Analysis - Declaration of Independence In May of 1776 a resolution was passed at the Virginia Convention in Williamsburg that asked the thirteen American colonies to declare the United Colonies free and independent from the British crown. At the second continental congress the resolution passed and on June 11, 1776 a five-man committee led by Thomas Jefferson was established to write the Declaration of Independence. On July 4, 1776 the members of the second continental congress signed into existence one of the most influential documents in history....   [tags: Argument Analysis Declaration of Independence] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay Response To Jefferson's Declaration Of Independence - The American Declaration of Independence has affected the foundation of the United States more than any other event or document in American history. The Declaration of Independence was the basis for what the country was established on. The document was a way for the colonists to emancipate themselves from the cruelty of King George. This document had such an impacting effect because it was such a new way of bringing up concerns. It was the first of its kind in the history of America in the aspect of liberation of a group of people....   [tags: Declaration Independence History American] 1755 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]