Preview
Preview

The Phantoms of Society in Virginia Woolf´s Progessions for Women Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 814 words (2.3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Human beings find the expected so comforting. People want to be prepared for any catastrophe and keep chaos in the world under control, but this strategy is flawed. In the conquest for control, humans have created an ideal of how life should be, and phantoms are formed from this ideal. Doris Lessing’s “To Room Nineteen” and Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas are both examples of how different people live with ambiguity. However, Virginia Woolf’s “Professions for Women” most clearly explains how society’s ideals affect its members. In the essay, Woolf speaks of how society’s expectations of a female writer manifested into the form of benevolent angel—who tried to repress Woolf’s naturally honest way of writing. The phantoms are created because the public is constantly trying to obtain what is considered “normal” by society to help maintain order. People think that abiding by the phantoms’ wishes to live with instability will make them happy, but this is not the truth.
Though the main point of Virginia Woolf’s “Professions for Women” is speaking to working women, it also provides insight into how the phantoms of society are created. In “Professions for Women,” Woolf tells of her own personal journey as a female writer and how breaking away from society’s expectations was difficult. The phantom of society was continually holding Woolf back, who began to call this being “The Angel in the House.” This “Angel in the House” was the image of society’s perfect woman, and it would whisper in Woolf’s ears what the public expected her to write. Woolf did not want to follow the angel’s instructions, so she killed the ghost. She puts it: “Had I not killed her she would have killed me. She would have plucked the heart out of my writin...


... middle of paper ...


...ich makes the people more content with their lives.
Altogether, these works show the phantom of society for what it is: a false counselor. After reading Woolf’s essay, readers can see examples of controlling ghosts in “To Room Nineteen” and “The Dead”. Under Milk Wood provides a glimpse into a liberated kind of lifestyle that is attainable without any ideals. With the knowledge of phantoms, readers can see the ghosts in their own lives and how the people who let the public’s expectations dominate their lives are usually unhappy and emotionally stifled. Though humans are only trying to make sense of the chaos that surrounds them by deciding what is “normal,” the effects of this epitome are far from benign. People should identify and kill their phantoms of society if they want to stand a chance of being able to comfortably live with the natural chaos in the world.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women - It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, Deborah Tannen]
:: 2 Works Cited
905 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rhetorical Analysis on Virginia Woolf´s Speech Professions for Women - ... “You are able, though not without great labour and effort, to pay the rent. You are earning your five hundred pounds a year. But this freedom is only a beginning—the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared.” In this, she not only speaks of the physical rooms itself that these women are finally able to afford due to their own efforts, but the “rooms” or empty spaces in these women’s identities and the difficult task that they face in confronting old traditions and perspectives so that they are able to reconcile their past with their view of their future....   [tags: society, desire, metaphor] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Phantoms in the Brain by V.S. Ramachadran - V.S. Ramachandran’s Phantoms in the Brain is a well-written book for what he believes to be the causes for some neurological theories and mysteries. He covers many syndromes such as Phantom Limb syndrome, the Capgras Delusion, Cotard’s Syndrome, Hemi-neglect, Blind-sight, Motion blindness, Anosognosia, multi-personality disorder, and the Zombie with in each of us. When he talks about these syndromes he is arguing for the theory of not having a soul because it is not physically tangible and using the neurological theory of consciousness to prove said argument....   [tags: neurological theories, phantom limb syndrome]
:: 1 Works Cited
1007 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Metaphor in Mrs. Dalloway, By Virginia Woolf - When WWI was over, many people questioned the brutality that carried on over the four years that the war was happening. The Europeans trust in authority and in their country began to collapse, and Modernism was a way they could respond to the damage of those beliefs. It was obvious that the old world was gone and a new one had started to arise. In this new world, while other aspects of Europe were advancing, improvement in the psychiatric treatment of mental conditions, for example shell-shock, fell short....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
:: 5 Works Cited
2442 words
(7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Women's Position in Society in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Essay - Women's Position in Society in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own The passage at the end of the Third Chapter in A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf deals with two major themes of this essay. The first being the ways in which women were kept down and made inferior to men, and the second being how this affected women’s writing. Woolf asserts that women were made inferior as a direct result of men’s perceived superiority. This assertment provides a new way of thinking about women’s lower position in society and the subsequent low opinion men held of women and their capabilties as writers....   [tags: Virginia Woolf room One's Own Essays] 1381 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2170 words
(6.2 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Essay - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Humor and Tragedy in Virginia Woolf's Orlando Essay - Virginia Woolfe's "Orlando" uses both humor and tragedy to observe humanity's often absurd and eccentric superficial constructions, both of class and gender. Woolfe creates the distinctions between male and female but continuously shatters them to reveal the illusions we create about gender. As George Meredith suggests, comedy is created when "The comic poet dares to show us men and women coming to this mutual likeness" (15). Woolfe, however, goes beyond simply bringing men and women together as equals; she blends them together as one androgynous individual, the effect of which causes us to laugh at the artificial way in which society attempts to define gender....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Essay - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway “Imagination is the one weapon in the war against reality.” -Jules de Gaultier Set just after one of England’s worst tragedies, Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway is a vivid picture of the effects of World War I on London’s high society, often in glaring contrast to the effects of shell shock suffered by war veteran Septimus Smith. For members of high society, the War’s impact is largely indirect, mainly affecting their conversations at posh social functions....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway Essays WWI]
:: 1 Works Cited
1866 words
(5.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Essay - Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Why would I start with Julia Duckworth Stephen to get to Virginia Woolf. One answer is Virginia’s often quoted statement that "we think back through our mothers if we are women" (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own). Feminism is rooted not just in a response to patriarchy but also in the history of females and their treatment of each other. Part of feminism is a reevaluation of the value of motherhood. But what does Virginia’s mother have to do with Virginia’s writing....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
:: 9 Works Cited
2260 words
(6.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]