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The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudroa Welty Essay

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In the words of Maya Angelou, “There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” Eudora Welty knew no such agony because, for the greater part of her life, Welty shared her stories through writing. Welty’s The Optimist’s Daughter contains a mix of “uncharacteristically incorporate[d] bit[s] of biographical [information],”(Marrs 1) adding in a secret element that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972. This novel serves not only as Welty’s premier novel but also as an ideal example of Southern literature.
Biography
Eudora Welty, born in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1909, respresented her state proudly as a renowned Southern novelist and short-story producer. Raised in a “close-knit and loving family,”(Marrs 1) Welty shared “a passion for reading and for language”(Marrs 10) with her mother, along with “bonds of devotion, camaraderie, and humor” (Marrs 1) with her brothers. From this well-rounded childhood, Welty developed a passion for learning, distinguishing herself among the top students of her class. With this scholastic success, Welty continued on to college, first attending Mississippi State College for Women, and transferring eventually to the University of Wisconsin.
Education alone occupied only a minute part of Welty’s interests, leading her to explore photography, resulting in the publishing of her photo book, Photographs. After photography ventures, Welty served “as a writer for a radio station and newspaper,”(Britannica Biographies) where her writing career began. Her career blossomed through her simpler, concise short stories, still focusing on the South and its people. After a successful collection of short works, Welty published her first novel, Delta Wedding, in 1946, which signaled the start of her n...


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...ures, despite their completely opposing story lines.
In Conclusion
The Optimist’s Daughter proves to be one of the most highly acclaimed Southern novels of all time. Through Welty’s descriptions, emotions, and aspects that are strictly Southern, she created a Pulitzer-winning masterpiece that will stand as the prime piece of Southern literature.




Works Cited
"Welty, Eudora." Britannica Biographies (2012): 1. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 24 Feb.
2014.

"Eudora Welty." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2013): 1. MAS Ultra – School
Edition. Web. 26 Feb. 2014.

Marrs, Suzanne. “Biography.” eudorawelty.org. Eudora Welty Foundation Scholar-in-Residence,
Millsaps College. Welty Collection, Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Web. 24 February 2013.

Welty, Eudora. The Optimist’s Daughter. New York: Vintage International, 1972. Print.





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