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Essay on New Journalism and Truman Capote's Case

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Literature—the dictionary defines it being the art of written works that is designed to entertain, educate and instruct; writers use literature in an attempt to transfer their ideas from paper to the reader; for some, this task means bringing their story to a different place and time that is entirely separate from what the reader could perceive as ordinary, on order to serve the writer’s intent. With this the impossible, becomes the probable, and the worst fear possibly imagined becomes the breathed reality; with no stated separation between the living, and the dying. The word literature in itself cannot be accurately defined, and by attempting to do so limits, the word is instantaneously limited in its usage and effect. Literature just is, just as much as it is not.
With literature, the characters in what we read, become our closest friends and our most feared enemies; we see ourselves within the characters and struggle to imagine if we would act in the same way as the characters, or if we would struggle to handle a situation differently. Easily, their faults become our own, and whatever tragedy befalls them we could, with no difficulty, conceive happening to us. Literature, in all of its genres, has sought to compel us, entertained us, educated us, and drove us to madness. It has served as life instruction, by using the characters as the lesson plan, and we-- the students. It is sometimes blunt, sometimes ugly, and in Truman Capote’s case, is sometimes so gruesome that we do not dare forget it.
With the novels publication in the 1960s, a new genre called ‘New Journalism’ had begun to surface; it sought to combine the elements of journalism with the elements of fiction and in doing so it sought to challenge the readers mo...


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...e who speaks not on their own but with a collective voice, that is completely omnipresent.
What makes Capote’s novel literature, is the way that Capote uses the blurred line between the fantastical; he does not seek to write the grotesque and gory details, which might attract some bibliophiles, instead his writing functions to preserve the memory of the Clutter family, and in equal light the memory of what Holcomb, as a town once was, a place where doors stayed unlocked, and strangers were not feared. and the wrote the falling action that really makes it key; he, the author, knew the end of the story and the outcome. However, in writing his work he did not give away to the reader every small point in the beginning of the novel; but instead used foreshadowing to suggest with almost every event and detail that was taken from actual evidence used in the court.
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