Preview
Preview

How the Western Film Genre Has Developed over the Past Century Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 2041 words (5.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Western film genre is typically set in a secluded village in the middle of the desert, normally in the American West. The setting includes wooden buildings, tumble weed, cacti, trains, horses and carriages. The storyline for western films is usually the same, namely, a hero travels to a remote village, usually on a horse, and brings peace to the warring villagers.

In a traditional Western film the clothing for the hero is usually a white hat, (this is to show purity). The hero would also wear a brightly coloured shirt , a pair of jeans and cowboy boots with spurs on the back of them. The hero is also very clean and also normally tall and good looking. A traditional Western includes things like white settlers living in a town and a white hero fights white baddies and usually the hero wins. In a traditional western the Native Americans attack the towns where religious and peaceful people live. This makes the Native Americans look like bad people and the whites as good people.

The first Western film ever made was called ‘The Great Train Robbery‘. It was made by ‘The Lumiere Brothers’ in 1903.This film was a high quality film, because they used some panning with the camera. This was unusual in its time because the cameras that they had, had to be put on a fixed point because they were too heavy to lift. This meant that they couldn’t move in for close-ups. Consequently it made it harder for the audience to understand the characters feelings and to understand the storyline. If the camera can move in on the villain when he is plotting something or pulling a gun out ready for a fight it is much easier for the audience to follow. ’The Great Train Robbery’ was a simple one-reeler action picture, about 10 minutes long, with...


... middle of paper ...


...eserts, wooden buildings, small towns and cacti for the setting, western music and wind sounds for the backing music, and crane shots and panning for the camera shots. Shooting games are very popular with boys and so using the Western as a basis for these games should mean that many of them will be sold.


Westerns have, and always will, be very popular. The storylines, the shoot-outs and the all action drama are popular with men. The handsome hero and the better roles for women in the films means that more women were attracted to Westerns. The advances in technology meant that lots of people came to see the films just to see the camera shots and the sound. The change of storylines which showed the Native Americans to be nice people also kept peoples interest in Westerns. This is why they are still used today to sell products such as jeans and computer games.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay about The Western Movie Genre - Westerns are the most important genre of the American film industry, a reflective tribute to the early days of the grand, wild American frontier. They are one of the oldest, most prevailing and versatile genres and one of the classically American genres in their mythic origins. The popularity of westerns has changed over time. Their most productive period was in the 1930s to the 1960s, and most lately in the 90s, there was a restoration of the genre. This original American art form concentrates on the frontier west located North America....   [tags: Film Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1395 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Western Genre: An Analysis of its History and Rise and Fall as a Genre - The Classic Western genre is dead. Western films created now are not considered Classic Western, but are instead categorized in the Post-Western form. This happened because the overuse of filmic codes in the Western genre eventually led to predictability in the films. These “genre film cycles” occur because of the overuse of predictability. Film cycles are when a genre and its conventions become overused to the point of death to that specific genre. For example, if the film The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (1966) were shown in a theater today people wonder why they were watching it, because they already knew what to expect from the typical western codes, such as good guys versus bad guys, gu...   [tags: films, classic westerns]
:: 5 Works Cited
1412 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Western as Commentary about Decaying Values Essay - The Western as Commentary about Decaying Values The Western, as a genre, is subversive of the values that its Christian characters possess. Western films frequently depict social depravity in terms of the mythology that developed during westward expansion. The mythology was inspired by the threat of the frontier wilderness to Puritan culture. In order to preserve their society, some Puritans departed from their ideal Christian lives. Western films portray compromises that cultures make of the values that they define themselves by in order to protect the integrity of their other values....   [tags: Western Culture Films Movies Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
3537 words
(10.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Genre Analysis: The Baroque and Rococo Periods - The following is a comparative analysis of Caravaggio’s The Musicians from the Italian Baroque period, and Watteau’s Mezzetin from the Rococo Period. Although both paintings depict a scene or event from everyday life, or a genre scene, the latter was painted more recently during the modern era and it differs immensely. The major differences become evident in the style of the painters as well as their personal representations of the subject matter. The works illustrate the evolvement of a certain genre in Western painting from Renaissance through the modern era....   [tags: Art]
:: 2 Works Cited
1550 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about The Cowboy Language of the Western Genre - When people hear the phrase “Howdy, Partner!” they often will associate that phrase with the sublime Western genre. Along with similar settings and themes in all writings of the Western genre, there is also a similar language that stories share. Common themes of the stories include remote western American towns with the cattle culture, plots with a simple hero versus villain conflict, or a protagonist’s encounters with different cultures like the Indians or Mormons. These heroes often will have to “rid the community of savage forces (generally Indians or outlaws) to make way for the ineluctable coming of civilization” (Levinson)....   [tags: western genre, gender genre]
:: 2 Works Cited
886 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Film Analysis: The Scenes in Wyatt Earp Essay - The scenes in Wyatt Earp expressed a feeling of comfort between the viewer and the film. The development of the characters reflect upon the hardship of the Old Western lifestyle. In this film, we are introduced to the idea of genre and the components that differentiate films altogether. However, Wyatt Earp has showed us a different side of genre, where two genres are joined together as one. The film Wyatt Earp has displayed examples of genre-breaking through its plot, character development and connection to modern day society....   [tags: old western lifestyle, modern society] 590 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Western as a Film Genre Essay - The Western as a Genre John Ford’s Stagecoach (United Artists) has been hailed as the official Western Classic. Released in 1939 after the lull in production of Westerns caused by the advent of sound and The Great Depression during the mid 1930’s, it is considered one of the key films that helped revived the A-Western in the 1940’s prior to WWII. Stagecoach has the classic Western recipe. The main staple of that recipe in Stagecoach were authentically dressed cowboys and town folk, the dress determined who or what they were; transportation in the form of horses, wagons, or stagecoaches; an authentic location, Monument Valley for example; and varying clashes some between Indians and settler...   [tags: American Film Industry, Western Classics, Genre]
:: 7 Works Cited
1434 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Science Fiction, Melodrama and Western Intersect in David Lynch’s Dune - Science Fiction, Melodrama and Western Intersect in David Lynch’s Dune A genre is a grouping of works, in this context a grouping of films, that are somehow similar or related in content or style. Genres are not strictly uniform over a period of time and do allow for growth and adaptation of their definitive characteristics. As the film industry has developed through the past century, various genres of films have emerged and are still evolving. Aspects of genres have been redefined and intermingled through the history of film....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2915 words
(8.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Women in the Western Genre Essay examples - Ever since the early 20th century, there had been several attempts and experimentation in creating a new genre of cinema known as the Western. The first well-known Western movie The Great Train Robbery (1903), while not necessarily being the first ever Western, it is by both film historians and theorists definitely considered the pinnacle of the genre, that got it all started and that would be the first step in creating others similar to it, but also very different. Because it was still an unknown genre in film, there had not yet been established a set of rules as for how to construct films in this new experimental genre so change was to be expected....   [tags: Proper, Fallen, Role]
:: 2 Works Cited
1539 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Brokeback Mountain and the Western Genre - The film genre of the Western has long since proven to be more about the conflict and showdowns that occur in the storyline. Usually the western genre incorporates traditional western motifs and icons and adheres to those common plot structures of the genre, but Brokeback Mountain is different from what is to be normally expected because it does not seem like a traditional and conventional Western film at all. Brokeback Mountain has several different twists to it, like the more modern take on it – traditionally, characters in Western films were riding horses, but because Brokeback Mountain is a more modern movie, the two characters Jack and Ennis are seen traveling in cars and...   [tags: Brokeback Mountain Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1012 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]