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How Children Learn Language: Neurobiological Insights Into Language Acquisition During Childhood.

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Language is perceived as the way humans communicate through the use of spoken words or sign action, it involves particular system and styles in which we interact with one another (Oxford 2009). Possessing this ability to communicate through the use of language is thought to be a quintessential human trait (Pinker 2000). Learning a language, know as language acquisition, is something that every child does successfully within a few years. It is the development by which they acquire the ability to perceive, produce and use words to understand and communicate. This involves selecting diverse abilities including phonetics, syntax and an extensive vocabulary. Language acquisition usually refers to first language acquisition, which studies infants' acquisition of their native language.Steven Pinker, one of the leading neuro-linguist, believes that it is virtually impossible to show how children could learn a language unless one assumes that they have a considerable amount of non-linguistic cognitive machinery in place before they start. Therefore heredity must be involved in language. However, children raised in different parts of the world acquire different language skills; therefore environment must also be an essential factor. Thus the main concern is about how these factors interact during language acquisition (Pinker). What most scientists are concerned with is how exactly the infants are able to lucrative learn the human language along with all its complexities. Cognition is also thought to be associated with language. It is seen as a way of positioning our thoughts in a way that is ...


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...sci_arttext&tlng=en – for the table above.
Anon. FOXP Gene- NCBI Bookshelf, US National Library of Medicine. Date Viewed: 09/03/2011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7023/
Anon. The Student Room UK. Date Viewed: 09/03/11 http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Revision:Child_Language_Acquisition_-_Speaking
Anon. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_acquisition
MacAndrew, A. (2003) FOXP2 and The Evolution of Language. Molecular Biology. Date viewed: 12/03/2011. http://www.evolutionpages.com/FOXP2_language.htm
Mason, T. (1993-2002). Timothy Mason’s Site. Date Viewed: 10/03/2011. http://www.timothyjpmason.com/WebPages/LangTeach/Licence/CM/OldLectures/L3_ExtremeCircs.htm
McCune, L. (2008) How Children Learn to Learn Language. Oxford Scholarship online. Date Viewed: 08/03/2011. http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/oso/public/content/psychology/9780195177879/toc.html


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