Preview
Preview

Essay about Hope and Fear in Dr. Faustus and Paradise Lost

Missing Works Cited
Length: 680 words (1.9 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Hope and fear are two powerful emotions that affect the main characters in both Dr. Faustus and Paradise Lost. The characters in both stories all have their own hopes, but they are all tested, tempted, and eventually led into committing sin by the Devil, who uses his ability to spread fear to manipulate the characters’ actions. While Adam, Eve, and Dr. Faustus all eventually give in to their fear of Satan and lose grace with God, the fate of Adam and Eve differs than that of Dr. Faustus, because the hopes of Adam and Eve were different than that of Dr. Faustus.
In Dr. Faustus, the titular character is an extremely intelligent man who has worked his way up from a lower class family to become a highly respected scholar. However, it is revealed early on that Faustus has become bored with the conventional fields of study, and decides to learn necromancy in order to continue his quest for knowledge. After he summons the demon Mephastophilis, Faustus cannot bear the sight of the demon’s true form. “I charge thee to return and change thy shape; thou art too ugly to attend on me (Marlowe, p.508, lines 23-24). At the first sight of Mephastophilis, Faustus is afraid, and we see that he is actually a coward. Despite being a coward, Faustus is full of hubris, and assumes that he can exert his will over Mephastophilis. Faustus plans to use Mephastophilis’ powers for his own selfish gains, but must first sell his soul over to Satan. Once the pact between Faustus and Lucifer has been completed, the good and evil angels arrive to talk to Faustus. The good evil encourages him to repent and accept god back into his heart, while the evil angel tells him not to bother as he is already damned. Faustus believes himself to be unable to rep...


... middle of paper ...


...tion due to Satan, their ultimate fates differed significantly. Dr. Faustus was ultimately condemned to hell, while Adam and Eve were eventually forgiven. These different outcomes appear to be a result of the individuals’ faith in God and their willingness to repent. Faustus had several opportunities to repent and was constantly reminded that all he needed to do to be saved was to reject Satan. However, his faith in God and himself was lacking, and he paid the price as a result. Adam and Eve on the other hand felt a great deal of sadness when they sinned against God. When they were cast out of the Garden of Eden, they were truly repentant, and given the opportunity to create their own paradise, which is why God was willing to forgive them. In both cases it appears that it is the characters faith in God that ultimately determines whether they will be forgiven.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Overreachers, a Look at Doctor Faustus and Satan Essay - Free will creates in angels and humanity the capacity to becoming an overreacher (Bakeless, 34). The inherent over-reaching quality leads Faustus of Christopher Marlowe’s “The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus’’ and John Milton’s ‘‘Paradise Lost’s Satan’’ both to hell (Boas and Marlowe, 23). However, if the “hell” concept was eliminated from these texts, both Faustus and Satan might still be considered overreachers who are ambitious and exercise their free will in detrimental ways. This is due to, “Before man is death and life, evil and good, that which he shall choose shall be given to him” (Marlowe)....   [tags: free will, John Milton, Christopher Marlowe]
:: 11 Works Cited
910 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Shakespeare's The Tempest and Marlowe's Doctor Faustus Essay - Shakespeare's brilliant portrayal of Prospero's use of magic and power continues to draw both readers and audiences with The Tempest's many meanings and interpretations. As a main character, Prospero, is a person that many people can identify themselves with, with his want to achieve his desires and gain power over others through the use of magic. It is this identification that exceeds Shakespearean works, with The Tempest both emulating and presenting themes from other works in the Elizabethan period....   [tags: Power, Magic, Literary Analysis]
:: 11 Works Cited
1886 words
(5.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Milton's Satan in Paradise Lost Essay - Milton's Satan in Paradise Lost After researching Satan and his kingdom, Hell, through the Bible and Paradise Lost to compare and contrast the two characterizations, I realized that Milton must have been a true Bible scholar. Milton’s Satan is described so closely to the Biblical view of Satan that it is often times hard to distinguish the two. Milton changed and elaborated on a few characteristics of his Satan and his Hell in order to create Paradise Lost, but based his characterization and his descriptions on his interpretation of the Bible, using his imagination to form a more vivid picture of how horrible Satan and Hell are in reality....   [tags: John Milton Satan Paradise Lost]
:: 6 Works Cited
1787 words
(5.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Free Essay on Milton's Paradise Lost - Paradise Lost as an Epic - Paradise Lost as an Epic   The Oxford English Dictionary defines "cosmos" as "the world or universe as an ordered and harmonious system," from the Greek, "kosmos," referring to an ordered and/or ornamental thing. Though Pythagoras is credited with first using this term to describe the Universe, probably since he is also the one most commonly cited for ideas of harmony and the Musica Mundana, cosmos is generally a contrast to "chaos"-"the first state of the universe." In explaining the theology and cosmology of Paradise Lost, Milton writes, "the heavens and earth/ Rose out of Chaos," describing the move from the formless mass to the ordered whole....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays] 1720 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on the Downfall of Man in John Milton's Paradise Lost - The classic tragedy Paradise Lost, written by John Milton, demonstrates how the fallen angels lose the paradise they have been given, and how this fall directly effects the downfall of man as well. Before anything ever was, all matter was chaos; utter darkness and filth. A mighty being, God, rose up out of chaos and created the firmament called Heaven, and all the universe (4). The angels, and archangels that populated Heaven, danced in the realms of the magnificent light (8). Lucifer, the highest archangel, stepped fourth and accused God of his power, jealously tying to take it from him....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1390 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Satan: The True Hero of Paradise Lost by Milton - Satan: The True Hero of Paradise Lost by Milton The identity of the true protagonist in Paradise Lost is a mystery. One would gather that Milton, a Puritan, would have no problem casting God as the hero, and Satan as the antagonist. However, looking back in history, Milton saw that most epic heroes had conflicts that prevented them from accomplishing their goals. God and his Son have no conflict, and Adam’s story does not really begin until the Fall of Man. Therefore, Milton was forced to select Satan as the hero of Paradise Lost because he adheres to the guidelines of epic poetry set by Homer, Virgil and others....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1622 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Fallen Angels in John Milton's Paradise Lost - The Fallen Angels in Paradise Lost       The fallen angels are Satan's minions and the voices by which Milton may express a variety of opinions and views, showing the diversity and intricacies of Hell, and the immorality of their actions and proposals. Whilst we are often impressed by the skill with which the individual leaders perform their tasks and speeches, we are never left in any doubt as to the truth of G-d, and the futility of their debates.  By examining the angels as a group, Milton is able to leave the infernal dungeon, to take a flight throughout history, giving his own point of view.  It is thus that Books I and II of "Paradise Lost" are so unique, as the...   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2066 words
(5.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Importance of Debate in John Milton’s Paradise Lost Essay - Importance of Debate in John Milton’s Paradise Lost Paradise Lost Is an epic novel depicting the creation of the world and Man's fall from grace. It also shows the fall of Lucifer and his entrapment in Hell with other arch demons. Though Lucifer was one of the most beautiful angels, he became the most hideous of creatures in hell as Satan, the most powerful demigod-god. Satan resents God for the punishment that he has received and seeks revenge on Him. Satan knows, however, that he and his forces are no match for the might of Heaven, so he calls for a debate among his devilish council to work through their options....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays] 703 words
(2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Milton’s Paradise Lost Essay - Milton’s Paradise Lost Critics of the Romantic Period have claimed that John Milton was unconsciously allied with the forces of evil. In Paradise Lost Milton’s accounts of “Devils & Hell” are much more elaborate and awe inspiring than those of “Angels & God.” Hell and Satan are portrayed extensively whereas the reader is given brief and inconclusive glimpses of Heaven. The apparent dichotomy is explained by William Blake: “The reason Milton wrote in fetters when he wrote of Angels & Gods, and at liberty when of Devils & Hell, is because he was a true Poet and of the Devil’s Party without knowing it.” Milton’s adherence to orthodox views resulted in an uninspired portrait of Heaven....   [tags: Paradise Lost ] 410 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Milton’s Paradise Lost Essay - Milton’s Paradise Lost has been praised as being the greatest English epic of all time, most stunningly in its author's depiction of the parents of humanity, Adam and Eve. How Milton chose to portray the original mother and father has been a focus of much criticism with contemporary readers. One of the main subjects of these comments is in reference to Eve, who, according to many, is a trivial character that is most definitely inferior to her mate. Nonetheless, many do not recognize that, after the fateful Fall, she becomes a much more evolved character....   [tags: Milton’s Paradise Lost]
:: 31 Works Cited
4358 words
(12.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]