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Essay about HIV in South Africa

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A country once in denial now has it’s South African political leaders addressing the disease that is slowing killing their population The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which evolves into acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is affecting South Africa socially as well as economically. This disease is also leaving over a million and a half children orphaned. Most of these children are not only orphaned but living with the virus as well.
Brief History of HIV/AIDS and Government Involvement in South Africa
The Centers for disease control (CDC) has declared AIDS a global pandemic. No one person or group is safe from contracting this virus; knowledge, and safety is the only way you can protect yourself. However, the first black South African diagnosed with AIDS was in 1987, and currently South Africa is home to over 5.7 million people living with HIV/AIDS, making it the largest population on earth with people infected. (3)
Former South African president Thabo Mbeki did not believe that a virus caused AIDS. He, along with other nonbelievers of the scientific knowledge behind the virus felt that AIDS was caused by a weakened immune system. Poverty, he said was the root of AIDS, and in order to end this disease in South Africa, they needed to eradicate poverty. Although there is currently
no cure for HIV/AIDS there is and was medication that could have been distributed in South Africa.
Due to the decisions of president Mbeki many people died because they did not receive the antiviral drugs that could have prolonged their lives. Also, many HIV+ women transmitted this virus to their children during childbirth because they were not given the antiviral medication needed during their pregnancy. The rate at which an infected ...


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...ry medical treatment. Obtaining medical treatment, and counseling will give HIV positive employees the correct knowledge about their condition. This will also help HIV negative employees in receiving facts about the virus and ways to protect themselves.
The companies that cannot afford such expensive measures should look to organizations such as Redpeg in order find out what services they can provide for employees. All of this would
help the labor force. People would not miss as much work, be able to earn an income, and support their families. People would still have HIV, but they would also prolong their lives by taking medication. This issue needs to be made important not just to South Africa, but to the world. Drastic steps are being taken in South Africa, but without education, lack of funds and healthcare workers it will only get worse.










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