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Historical Transitioning Within Feminist Activism Essay

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No matter your affiliation regarding the origin of the species, be it evolutionary or intelligent design, historically women have long been viewed as little more than supporting cast members in the theatrical production known as humanity. In the evolutionary perspective we think of primitive man as the hunter-gatherer whom, club in hand, wanders out of the cave to claim a woman with a blow to the head then dragging her back to the cave to propagate. In the intelligent design camp, as it pertains to Christianity, the first woman was created to alleviate man's loneliness, and so from the rib of a man she was formed. Neither of these ideas immediately invoke a line of thought that engenders an inherit equality among the sexes; thus creating a canyon of separation that has emboldened segregation in all nearly all facets of life.
From this glaring void sprang a movement that was as much philosophical as was social, this 'feminist' movement would qualitatively change the role women played in the world henceforth . Though the argument could be made that the earliest attempts at what may be considered feminist activism be traced back to 17th century Europe, this paper aims to concentrate mainly on the movements that transpired in the United States. The topic is of great interest, as it has caused since its inception a global paradigm shift in the ways women are treated in comparison to men.
First-Wave Feminism
Life for a woman in the 1800's was rather bleak by today's standards. Education for women was very limited. By and large women were constrained to learning little more than reading, writing, and arithmetic. The rest of the education of a woman focused primarily on domestic responsibilities such as cleaning and needle work, and ...


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...wever, through this class I've come to understand and value the necessity of the first and second wave of feminism. Based on the incomplete scholarly information pertaining directly to the subject of third-wave feminism, I've decided to have an open mind towards whatever the third-wave may come to be defined as and make an assessment based on more complete information.
As the movement advances in any of its forms, current or future, I expect the world to become increasingly friendly towards the plight of women. Perhaps someday culminating in a communal equilibrium wherein misogynistic behavior is treated with the same level of societal hostility that is shown towards Klan members.



Works Cited

Dicker, R. C. (2008). A history of U.S. feminisms. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press
Weatherford, D. (1994). American women's history. New York: Prentice Hall General Reference.



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